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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 20 Oct 2011 (Thursday) 11:46
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Milkyway nightscapes

 
davidfarina
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Jul 08, 2016 17:35 |  #3166

gaabnz wrote in post #18061554 (external link)
Flashllights on mobiles are just great for lighting the foreground :)

Jup, but only if you got something to diffuse the light. I found with the lights on my iphone too hard to expose the foreground nicely


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Jul 09, 2016 00:45 |  #3167

davidfarina wrote in post #18061565 (external link)
Jup, but only if you got something to diffuse the light. I found with the lights on my iphone too hard to expose the foreground nicely

Strange, I didn't run into that issue. My foreground was relatively far away though (50'?) and the light was dim over a long period of time (30s).


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danialsturge
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Jul 09, 2016 05:41 |  #3168

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davidfarina
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Jul 09, 2016 05:45 |  #3169

mikepj wrote in post #18061821 (external link)
Strange, I didn't run into that issue. My foreground was relatively far away though (50'?) and the light was dim over a long period of time (30s).

I tried it during 30s exposures and every single time i pointed the light too long, speaking about 2 or 3 seconds, made it look ridiculous. I can imagine its possible but you definitely got to know how to do it :)


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TheInfamousGreedo
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Jul 09, 2016 12:19 |  #3170

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IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/J2go​qo  (external link) Milky McClure (external link) by TJ Simon (external link), on Flickr

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mikepj
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Jul 09, 2016 13:54 |  #3171

davidfarina wrote in post #18061925 (external link)
I tried it during 30s exposures and every single time i pointed the light too long, speaking about 2 or 3 seconds, made it look ridiculous. I can imagine its possible but you definitely got to know how to do it :)

Whoa, really, it overexposed in just a few seconds? It must be a distance issue, because I kept my iPhone flashlight on for the full 30 second exposure. In real life the light didn't seem to illuminate much because I was so far away from the grassy area.

The other thing I've tried for lighting the foreground is using a Speedlite. I enable the option so pushing the ready light button will do a quick flash, and will just flicker that a couple of times manually to "splash" some light in the foreground.


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Jul 10, 2016 02:06 |  #3172

Please feel free to give me some C&C on this shot... I am new to the MW shots, and where I live I am lucky to get what I get, but is there anything I could do to bring anything out better? I used Photoshop Elements 13, using only the Levels controls.... I am not very good with PSE, need to learn more..

Before and After - Thank you


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Jul 10, 2016 02:24 as a reply to  @ Inspeqtor's post |  #3173

I suck at Photoshop but from what I tried you really need to crank up the ISO, and open that lens up to bring out the Milkyway. Before my first not so great attempt I read up on what to do here.
http://www.lonelyspeck​.com …-of-the-milky-way-galaxy/ (external link)

And here. http://www.lonelyspeck​.com …-way-exposure-calculator/ (external link)




  
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xpfloyd
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Post edited over 2 years ago by xpfloyd. (5 edits in all)
     
Jul 10, 2016 03:03 |  #3174

Yep, shoot at f/2.8 with that lens and at least double your ISO. You are also shooting too long an exposure for 70mm on a crop. Try shooting at 17mm instead or you will get star trailing at 30seconds. Use the 400/focal length as a guide (that's full frame so you need to multiply by crop factor). So for your lens at 17mm it's 400/17x1.5=15 seconds max. As a comparison if you shoot at 70mm again it would be 400/70x1.5=3.8 seconds max before star trails


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Jul 10, 2016 04:05 |  #3175

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tnick771
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Jul 10, 2016 10:38 |  #3176

Every tutorial I've read still yields me bad pictures... can someone post a tutorial they swear by?


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ptcanon3ti
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Jul 10, 2016 10:46 |  #3177

tnick771 wrote in post #18062973 (external link)
Every tutorial I've read still yields me bad pictures... can someone post a tutorial they swear by?


There are so many variables involved. Anything from light pollution to the camera you're using has an effect on the outcome of MW shots. Post processing is one of the most important factors in MW shots, in my opinion. Most of the great shots you see here are a result of fantastic location and equally fantastic post processing. You really have to experiment until you find a combination that works for you.


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Post edited over 2 years ago by danialsturge.
     
Jul 10, 2016 10:53 |  #3178

ptcanon3ti wrote in post #18062985 (external link)
There are so many variables involved. Anything from light pollution to the camera you're using has an effect on the outcome of MW shots. Post processing is one of the most important factors in MW shots, in my opinion. Most of the great shots you see here are a result of fantastic location and equally fantastic post processing. You really have to experiment until you find a combination that works for you.

I'd add that if you take a solid photo to begin with, then the post processing comes quite easily and little is required to really make that Milky Way pop. I've taken images and tried to eek out detail that just wasn't there and then I've taken photos where the conditions were perfect and all it required was a few shifts of the sliders in Lightroom and I have a final image. The photo above that I just posted was the latter for me.

But for sure, trial and error is the way to go (like all aspects of photography), and location is key - dark skies will help way more than the type of camera, your PP skills etc. Keep at it and you'll get there eventually.


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ptcanon3ti
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Jul 10, 2016 11:03 |  #3179

danialsturge wrote in post #18062993 (external link)
I'd add that if you take a solid photo to begin with, then the post processing comes quite easily and little is required to really make that Milky Way pop. I've taken images and tried to eek out detail that just wasn't there and then I've taken photos where the conditions were perfect and all it required was a few shifts of the sliders in Lightroom and I have a final image. The photo above that I just posted was the latter for me.

But for sure, trial and error is the way to go (like all aspects of photography), and location is key - dark skies will help way more than the type of camera, your PP skills etc. Keep at it and you'll get there eventually.


Granted that a well done photo will be easier to PP, than one that is not as well done. But getting a well done photo LARGELY depends on location and the camera used. Example...I'm in NJ in the USA, this is one of the most heavily light polluted areas in the country that is not a "big city". My skies are simply not as dark as skies in Utah or other parts of the world. Also - my former camera, a Canon 7D, could NEVER produce a night sky shot as well as my current camera, Nikon D750, no matter what I did.

Like I said the are MANY variables involved in getting a good MW shot.


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FEChariot
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Jul 10, 2016 11:11 |  #3180

tnick771 wrote in post #18062973 (external link)
Every tutorial I've read still yields me bad pictures... can someone post a tutorial they swear by?

lonelyspeck.com was a good resource. In dark skies I find an exposure of ISO 6400, 2.8 for 30 seconds works best for me. I try not to shoot I light polluted areas and living in Colorado means I am not too far away from dark skies. Not sure what I would do if I was still living on the east coast.


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Milkyway nightscapes
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