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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 20 Oct 2011 (Thursday) 11:46
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Milkyway nightscapes

 
Jelloneck
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Jul 10, 2016 12:08 |  #3181

I'm anxious to get out to the Outer Banks to get some good shots but that probably wont happen until September. Has anyone shot there?

Been scouting locations within a 1.5 hour drive to keep practicing, this was just over an hour north of Raleigh. Sky was plenty dark but shooting south I have the Raleigh light pollution.
I am also interested in capturing the arch of the milkyway as I see in many pictures...however whenever I go out I can get the "core" but no luck getting the rest.

I'll probably rework these but would appreciate any feedback/suggestions. Thanks


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xpfloyd
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Jul 10, 2016 12:15 |  #3182

Forgot to mention, the best time to shoot is when it's a new moon.


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danialsturge
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Jul 10, 2016 12:19 |  #3183

Jelloneck wrote in post #18063046 (external link)
I am also interested in capturing the arch of the milkyway as I see in many pictures...however whenever I go out I can get the "core" but no luck getting the rest.

Southern Hemisphere is better for that I believe!


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xpfloyd
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Jul 10, 2016 13:17 |  #3184

I could be wrong but I think the photos where you see the arch are usually multi image panos


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danialsturge
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Jul 10, 2016 13:35 |  #3185

xpfloyd wrote in post #18063092 (external link)
I could be wrong but I think the photos where you see the arch are usually multi image panos

I'm talking about when the core is in the middle of the sky rather than near the horizon. Pretty sure for that the Southern Hemisphere is the place to be. Multi image panos are definitely required, but a fish eye lens works very well indeed.


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junglialoh
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Jul 10, 2016 18:45 as a reply to  @ post 18048101 |  #3186

Wow awesome shot!




  
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Inspeqtor
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Jul 10, 2016 18:59 |  #3187

Canonuser123 wrote in post #18062759 (external link)
I suck at Photoshop but from what I tried you really need to crank up the ISO, and open that lens up to bring out the Milkyway. Before my first not so great attempt I read up on what to do here.
http://www.lonelyspeck​.com …-of-the-milky-way-galaxy/ (external link)

And here. http://www.lonelyspeck​.com …-way-exposure-calculator/ (external link)

Thank you for the links!! When I was working with my set-up I was trying to hold a flashlight, and move my camera around.... I was thinking I need some kind of light to wear on my head.... your links provided a better product than I was thinking about as one of the links mentioned a red light night vision.... I have one ordered now!

xpfloyd wrote in post #18062767 (external link)
Yep, shoot at f/2.8 with that lens and at least double your ISO. You are also shooting too long an exposure for 70mm on a crop. Try shooting at 17mm instead or you will get star trailing at 30seconds. Use the 400/focal length as a guide (that's full frame so you need to multiply by crop factor). So for your lens at 17mm it's 400/17x1.5=15 seconds max. As a comparison if you shoot at 70mm again it would be 400/70x1.5=3.8 seconds max before star trails

You both mentioned cranking up my ISO which I will do on my next attempt. I was hoping and thinking I could do that tonight, but sadly the clouds moved in yet again....

As for leaving a star trail.... I did not think about mentioning ( I should have thought of this!) that I am using my iOptron star tracker! It was not a perfect alignment as I do see some trails....

Eddie, I am not following your math.... where does the 400 from? Also when I take 400, divide by 17 then multiply by 1.5 I get 35.294... how do you get 15 seconds?

If I shoot at 17MM this is what I get... I am right under trees at a fence line, with a highway right beyond that...


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Canonuser123
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Post edited over 2 years ago by Canonuser123.
     
Jul 10, 2016 20:25 as a reply to  @ Inspeqtor's post |  #3188

I set my exposure so it is right in the middle on the Histogram, straight out of the camera the sky looks a little washed out but the Milkyway shows up, I just am not very good at the PP end.
If your not getting star trails I guess you can keep the shutter open longer without having to go crazy with the ISO.




  
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Inspeqtor
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Jul 10, 2016 21:49 |  #3189

Canonuser123 wrote in post #18063437 (external link)
I set my exposure so it is right in the middle on the Histogram, straight out of camera, the sky looks a little washed out but the Milkyway shows up, I just am not very good at the PP end.
If your not getting star trails I guess you can keep the shutter open longer without having to go crazy with the ISO.

My problem with trying to get shots of the MW is in that spot under the trees, I cannot see Polaris at all. You ask how in the world do I get the tracker lined up? I got this idea from Roy.... it is not perfect, but it gets me kinda close. I set the tracker so it is as close to vertical as possible, then using the compass on the tracker, I set it as close to North as possible.... how do I set the angle? This was Roy's idea..... since I work in a precision machine shop I cut a piece of oak to the precise angle needed, then use that with a line level on the angle.
Roy says he has had good luck using his in a 'blind area'.... my first time to use mine was just last night (Saturday night the 9th) I may need more practice.

Then my 2nd problem is not having a really clear wide sight of the MW without the highway and trees as shown above in another post.


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kukulkan
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Jul 11, 2016 00:33 |  #3190

Hey fellow photographers , at last my first attempts of the MW many mistakes here I should mention , first I forgot to shoot Raw in combination of JPEG , second not so great gear as lenses comes but oh well. I can't figure how to use deepsky tracker software at all. so I'm using single shots to pp in lightroom an this are the results.
Any help, advise and suggestions that will help my rookie attempts are very welcome!!
These where shot in Joshua tree Natl park, Ca

IMAGE: https://c7.staticflickr.com/8/7455/28198918206_e9832d2487_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/JXQP​WW  (external link) 8083T (external link) by alan marquez (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: https://c5.staticflickr.com/8/7314/27952103300_4981fa2d1c_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/JA2Q​tw  (external link) 8058tc (1 of 1) (external link) by alan marquez (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: https://c5.staticflickr.com/9/8800/27617324124_f631570b96_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/J5s1​hL  (external link) 8028t (1 of 1) (external link) by alan marquez (external link), on Flickr



  
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xpfloyd
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Jul 11, 2016 02:34 |  #3191

Inspeqtor wrote in post #18063376 (external link)
Thank you for the links!! When I was working with my set-up I was trying to hold a flashlight, and move my camera around.... I was thinking I need some kind of light to wear on my head.... your links provided a better product than I was thinking about as one of the links mentioned a red light night vision.... I have one ordered now!

You both mentioned cranking up my ISO which I will do on my next attempt. I was hoping and thinking I could do that tonight, but sadly the clouds moved in yet again....

As for leaving a star trail.... I did not think about mentioning ( I should have thought of this!) that I am using my iOptron star tracker! It was not a perfect alignment as I do see some trails....

Eddie, I am not following your math.... where does the 400 from? Also when I take 400, divide by 17 then multiply by 1.5 I get 35.294... how do you get 15 seconds?

If I shoot at 17MM this is what I get... I am right under trees at a fence line, with a highway right beyond that...

If you are using a tracker then you will be able to keep your ISO lower and shoot for longer to get an equivalent exposure with less noise. You will probably have to switch the tracker off and take a second shot of the foreground and merge in post as you will get foreground trailing depending on your exposure time.

You can ignore the 400 rule if using a tracker however to answer your questions it's just a rule of thumb people use (some use the 500 rule). The maths for your 17mm lens is 400/(17x1.5) I.e 400/25.5

PS that's assuming canon crop is 1.5 like Sony. If it's not then adjust that number to whatever canon is


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mikepj
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Jul 11, 2016 09:42 |  #3192

Inspeqtor wrote in post #18063376 (external link)
As for leaving a star trail.... I did not think about mentioning ( I should have thought of this!) that I am using my iOptron star tracker! It was not a perfect alignment as I do see some trails....

Assuming you are able to get it aligned well, you should definitely try longer exposures using the iOptron. I've heard of people using exposures near 60 seconds with it. It's not worth owning a tracker if you don't take advantage of the longer exposures it allows.

If I had your setup, I would try to shoot 17mm at f2.8 (f3.2 if you find your lens to be too soft at f2.8), ISO 3200, for about 45-60 seconds. Get the exposure to be in the middle of the histogram, and then drop the levels down when post-processing the image.

I would also try one at a much longer exposure (and lower ISO), to see how well the tracker is doing. Maybe the same 17mm f2.8, ISO 800 (or even 400) for 120 seconds.

Judge the star trails by how long they are when viewing the image fitting to your screen. When pixel peeking at 100% crop, you might still see trails, but if you don't see trails when viewing at regular screen size, you're doing just fine.


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Canonuser123
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Jul 11, 2016 10:59 as a reply to  @ Inspeqtor's post |  #3193

It looks like your tracking is pretty good, I don't see any star trails in that shot.




  
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Inspeqtor
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Jul 11, 2016 11:38 |  #3194

mikepj wrote in post #18063861 (external link)
Assuming you are able to get it aligned well, you should definitely try longer exposures using the iOptron. I've heard of people using exposures near 60 seconds with it. It's not worth owning a tracker if you don't take advantage of the longer exposures it allows.

If I had your setup, I would try to shoot 17mm at f2.8 (f3.2 if you find your lens to be too soft at f2.8), ISO 3200, for about 45-60 seconds. Get the exposure to be in the middle of the histogram, and then drop the levels down when post-processing the image.

I would also try one at a much longer exposure (and lower ISO), to see how well the tracker is doing. Maybe the same 17mm f2.8, ISO 800 (or even 400) for 120 seconds.

Judge the star trails by how long they are when viewing the image fitting to your screen. When pixel peeking at 100% crop, you might still see trails, but if you don't see trails when viewing at regular screen size, you're doing just fine.

As I believe I mentioned before, when shooting to the south to try to get the Milky Way I am under pine trees at a fence line. I have no vision of Polaris here, so I tried doing my blind alignment I also mentioned earlier. Thus not a perfect alignment, but it was not horrible either.

Canonuser123 wrote in post #18063927 (external link)
It looks like your tracking is pretty good, I don't see any star trails in that shot.

Here is a 100% crop which does show 'some' trailing. Not horrible, but it is there....


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mikepj
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Jul 11, 2016 12:16 |  #3195

Inspeqtor wrote in post #18063959 (external link)
As I believe I mentioned before, when shooting to the south to try to get the Milky Way I am under pine trees at a fence line. I have no vision of Polaris here, so I tried doing my blind alignment I also mentioned earlier. Thus not a perfect alignment, but it was not horrible either.

Are you just eyeballing the placement, or are you using a compass (on your phone or otherwise)? Make sure you correct for declination between magnetic north and true north (which is what it should be aligned to).

http://www.ngdc.noaa.g​ov/geomag/declination.​shtml (external link)


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Milkyway nightscapes
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