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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 27 Jul 2016 (Wednesday) 11:51
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troutfisher
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Jul 27, 2016 11:51 |  #1

I wonder if anyone can suggest a less circuitous route than the one I am using at the moment to achieve my desired effect

The photo below was taken with a Sigma 15mm fisheye f3.5 at a camera to subject distant of about 18-24"
the lens only goes to f2.8 so that would not have made a great deal of difference


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It does not show all that well on here but as would be expected from the lens the DoF is enormous and the back wall is in sharp focus.
I want to get the sculpture in focus and the back wall blurred ( I appreciate that using a faster lens ,f1.4 would have done the job but I would not have been able to get close enough-MFD etc and I did not have one with me)
What I am doing at the moment is to mask the sculpture and select, copy this to a new file.
Then apply gaussian blur to the whole image and then paste back the selected part of the image.
This gives me the desired effect but it seems very complicated.
I have tried putting the sculpture on a new layer and then blurring the background but this does not work, so am I doing something wrong ?

Thanks in advance

Chris

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chauncey
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Jul 27, 2016 12:01 |  #2

Your technique is sound...have you tried using "lens blur" rather than gaussian blur?


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Jul 27, 2016 12:08 |  #3

Try this technique: https://www.youtube.co​m …4P6jSEo&index=1​66&list=WL (external link)

It's definitely complicated but what you are asking for isn't very easy to do without looking cheesy.

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kirkt
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Jul 27, 2016 12:35 |  #4

You can use the Lens Blur filter in PS and make a "Depth Map" that will guide the application of the Lens Blur throughout the image. You typically do this just like you would create a mask - White in the depth map represents no added blur and black in the map represents fully blurred, according to the blur settings you choose. Then you select this map in the Lens Blur filter dialog and PS will apply the full blur settings according to the strength you prescribe in the map image.

Attached is an example of the filter - the inset image shows the depth map I made. I used the pen tool to trace the statue and plinth upon which it sits. I made a gradient to generally indicate depth and then loaded the pen tool path as a selection and filled it with white to make the entire statue "in focus". I did this operation on a layer and then copied that layer and pasted it into a new alpha channel. The Lens Blur tool permits you to select an alpha channel as a depth map.

You can also use the depth map image (or the path you made to produce the image) as a mask for further edits - I added some clarity and sharpness to the image but used the depth map as a mask on that layer to limit the adjustment to the statue.

Be reasonable with the blur - too much is too much.

Have fun!

Kirk


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troutfisher
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Jul 27, 2016 12:46 as a reply to  @ kirkt's post |  #5

Thank you that's what I was trying to do, it seems I have a bit of a learning curve


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kirkt
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Jul 27, 2016 15:07 |  #6

troutfisher wrote in post #18079152 (external link)
Thank you that's what I was trying to do, it seems I have a bit of a learning curve

Here is a Dropbox link to download the PSD file I created to produce the above image:

https://www.dropbox.co​m …2bi9oa8rm/statu​e.psd?dl=0 (external link)

You can take a look at the layers, etc.

kirk


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troutfisher
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Jul 27, 2016 15:58 as a reply to  @ kirkt's post |  #7

Thank you for that,much appreciated and it will be very helpful


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Damo77
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Jul 27, 2016 20:48 |  #8

troutfisher wrote in post #18079083 (external link)
What I am doing at the moment is to mask the sculpture and select, copy this to a new file.
Then apply gaussian blur to the whole image and then paste back the selected part of the image.
This gives me the desired effect but it seems very complicated.
I have tried putting the sculpture on a new layer and then blurring the background but this does not work, so am I doing something wrong ?

Thanks in advance

Chris

You're missing the clone step. The clone step is vital.
Method (external link)


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troutfisher
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Jul 30, 2016 09:25 |  #9

Just to say thank you to all those who contributed
I think I am well on the way with this

Before


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And after


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Once again thanks for everyone's help

Chris
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twists ­ n ­ turns
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Jul 30, 2016 14:09 as a reply to  @ kirkt's post |  #10

Ty! :)




  
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Post edited over 1 year ago by twists n turns. (2 edits in all)
     
Jul 30, 2016 14:10 as a reply to  @ troutfisher's post |  #11

Not quite there yet mate :( Trickier image too id think. You have more foreground too/less of a subject to work on to convince the viewer.
Just my 2p :/




  
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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Jul 30, 2016 14:20 |  #12

rather than allowing the lens to AF, just stick it at it's minimum focus distance and try it from there. You can shoot closer than the technical MFD with such a wide lens and still get close subject in focus.

that may or may not work, so keep practicing your masking and use a gradient to select the OOF areas as in post 4. You can even create multiple channels and then add each selection to the previous to build a more complex selection.


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mclaren777
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Jul 31, 2016 18:36 |  #13

Wouldn't it make more sense to just shoot with a non-UWA lens and let the focal length compression create the bokeh you're looking for?


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kirkt
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Aug 01, 2016 08:48 |  #14

One way to get a wide FOV with a shallow DOF is to use the "Brenizer Method":

https://en.wikipedia.o​rg/wiki/Brenizer_Metho​d (external link)

to stitch together a series of images shot with a longer focal length at wide open aperture. This method can be performed handheld with some practice and a good understanding of the requirements for your particular stitching solution.

There is an online calculator:

http://brettmaxwellpho​to.com/Brenizer-Method-Calculation/ (external link)

That will estimate the effective aperture and focal length of your stitched image, given the focal length, aperture, single image size and composite image size of your source shots.

Attached is a quick test of the method I made a while ago - it's an award-winning image for sure! I used a 135mm lens and shot at f/4 from a distance of about 15-20 feet to the car. There were cars parked on either side of the subject, a few parking spots away, so it was relatively easy to define the borders of the field of view during composition and shooting of the image sequence.

The use of a longer focal length permits you to stand further away from the subject, which can potentially help reduce parallax errors during stitching. As with any stitching solution, there are issues that may require some post work, like moving subjects in the field of view, or ghosting issues due to moving or changing elements in the background. Anticipating the post work required to remove or deal with these elements will aid in capturing enough data at shooting time to create a nice, seamless comp.

Kirk


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Aug 01, 2016 08:58 |  #15

kirkt wrote in post #18079131 (external link)
You can use the Lens Blur filter in PS and make a "Depth Map" that will guide the application of the Lens Blur throughout the image. You typically do this just like you would create a mask - White in the depth map represents no added blur and black in the map represents fully blurred, according to the blur settings you choose. Then you select this map in the Lens Blur filter dialog and PS will apply the full blur settings according to the strength you prescribe in the map image.

Thanks for this!
I've not used the Lens Blur filter with any success before. This is definitely helpful.


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