Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS General Gear Talk Camera Bags, Backpacks & Cases 
Thread started 25 Jul 2016 (Monday) 13:28
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Hiking/backpacking camera bags?

 
Scrumhalf
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,427 posts
Gallery: 61 photos
Likes: 3910
Joined Jul 2012
Location: Portland OR USA
     
Aug 03, 2016 00:31 |  #16

I'm going to order this insert to go with the pack.

http://www.ebay.com …geName=STRK%3AM​EBIDX%3AIT (external link)

I think it should work - it is just a bit smaller than the medium F-Stop ICU. I sent a note to one of the reviewers of the Gregory Tarhee pack and they gave me the interior dimensions of the pack that seemed to indicate that it would fit fine.

The backpack was $125 on sale at Campsaver. I thought that was a decent deal. The F-Stop Loka UL which was another that I was eyeing was $200 and was backordered for several weeks.


Sam
5D4 | 6D | 7D2 (2 bodies) | Reasonably good glass
Gear List

If I don't get the shots I want with the gear I have, the only optics I need to examine is the mirror on the bathroom wall. The root cause will be there.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
jbrackjr
Senior Member
481 posts
Likes: 35
Joined Dec 2011
Location: Georgia, USA
     
Aug 07, 2016 22:51 |  #17

Aressem wrote in post #18077238 (external link)
I do a lot of hiking and backpacking. Is there a bag out there designed for both backpacking/hiking as well as carrying camera equipment? I usually carry a gripped 7D II, 70-200 2.8, 18-35 1.8, 50 1.4 art, 8mm fisheye and 10-18 IS STM

B&H has the Clik Venture 35 on sale for $99 (I just bought one) which was mentioned above by gremlin75. The Venture series has been discontinued. However, it really is a nice pack. Fits my 60D with 100-400 mounted + 10-22, 17-55, 15-85 + flash. Will mount a small or large tripod on the back. Room above the camera equipment for sweater, windbreaker and some snacks.

A very nice pack and well worth the money.


Jim
Gear List

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Fiddlesticks
Hatchling
2 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Jun 2013
Post edited over 3 years ago by Fiddlesticks.
     
Aug 08, 2016 00:03 |  #18

Realizing this is a bit too late, but for those who may read this thread in the future, here's my 2 cents...

I do a lot of solo backpacking with photography as the catalyst/priority, so my entire setup is geared toward it. When backpacking several days with lots of elevation change, really a backpack built for multi-day trips is imperative. I also try to be as lightweight as possible, knowing my camera gear will tack on almost 10 pounds. I've concluded that a comfortable pack is far and away the key ingredient. So here's what I've landed on:

For day trips: the MindShift Rotation 180 pro. Is it expensive? YES. However, it's already paid off when I've been on sand dunes where I don't want to put my pack down (blowing sand in a thunderstorm), and in creeks where the water is wall-to-wall (in the San Juan Mountains). The rotation really does work amazingly well, and it is as comfortable as a backpacking backpack. The suspension is rock solid and it has a legitimate hip belt that carries the load (unlike LowePro "waist straps" that are only meant to help balance the load). I've had 30 pounds in it and it's felt absolutely fine hiking some pretty rugged terrain. I've never experienced a pack quite like it, and I'm absolutely sold on it.

For overnights and multi-day: the Granite Gear Blaze AC 60, with my main camera strapped to the front shoulder straps in a LowePro Toploader 50 AW. I use a 6D with the 16-35 f/4 IS (brilliant lens), which fits snuggly but it's solid. The IS really does work, I've actually taken bracketed shots hand-held using the IS successfully. With the weight of backpacking gear on the back, the camera in front helps balance it all a bit, so that works nicely, and it's readily-accessible since it's right in front.

The Blaze AC 60 is so light it can double as a peak bag, but comfortable and sturdy enough to handle up to 40 pounds (I stay around 33-35 pounds max for 5-6 day trips, which includes the 10 pounds of camera gear). And then whatever you decide for extra lenses and accessories (an ICU, individual lens cases, whatever), it all fits quite nicely in the pack wherever you need it (above food, below food, etc.).

But whatever you do (Blaze AC 60, Osprey, REI, etc.), get a backpack that can handle the weight COMFORTABLY, then improvise on how to get the gear inside. DON'T get a heavy photography backpack with all sorts of pockets and zippers and such, which just adds up the weight.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Ming-Tzu
Senior Member
917 posts
Gallery: 4 photos
Likes: 13
Joined Apr 2012
     
Aug 14, 2016 19:30 as a reply to  @ Fiddlesticks's post |  #19

Great advice here. Which Mindshift did you get? And did you feel it was sufficient for your camera and hiking needs?


<insert gear here>

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Scrumhalf
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,427 posts
Gallery: 61 photos
Likes: 3910
Joined Jul 2012
Location: Portland OR USA
     
Aug 25, 2016 11:59 |  #20

@Aressem, I think we have a winner! I spent 3 days hiking around Rainier with the Gregory Targhee 45 and the eBay insert I mentioned above and the combo was excellent. The pack is super comfortable, and knowing you, I think you'll like the fact that the Targhee is a backcountry ski/mountain backpack with doodads to secure picks, ice shovels, skis, snowboards, etc. There's plenty of room above the insert for layering clothes, etc.

I'll post photos by tomorrow.


Sam
5D4 | 6D | 7D2 (2 bodies) | Reasonably good glass
Gear List

If I don't get the shots I want with the gear I have, the only optics I need to examine is the mirror on the bathroom wall. The root cause will be there.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Aressem
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
4,364 posts
Gallery: 39 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 511
Joined Dec 2009
Location: Vancouver, BC
     
Aug 25, 2016 12:00 |  #21

Scrumhalf wrote in post #18105895 (external link)
@Aressem, I think we have a winner! I spent 3 days hiking around Rainier with the Gregory Targhee 45 and the eBay insert I mentioned above and the combo was excellent. The pack is super comfortable, and knowing you, I think you'll like the fact that the Targhee is a backcountry ski/mountain backpack with doodads to secure picks, ice shovels, skis, snowboards, etc. There's plenty of room above the insert for layering clothes, etc.

I'll post photos by tomorrow.

Amazing! Thank you so much for remembering my post and sharing your experience with me. I really appreciate it! :D Glad to hear your trip went well :)


Ryan Mackay WEBSITE (external link) | FACEBOOK (external link) | GEAR LIST | Buy & Sell Feedback: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SailingAway
Senior Member
386 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 90
Joined Sep 2013
Post edited over 3 years ago by SailingAway.
     
Sep 01, 2016 16:05 |  #22

There's a lot I would do to avoid a backpack for dayhiking or day xc skiing. Never liked backpacks for strenuous exercise, though they're unavoidable for overnights.


One thing I *really* like about waistpacks is that you don't need to take them off to get to all the storage. Loosen the waist belt and spin them around if needed.

Another is that my back doesn't get so sweaty.

Perhaps the best is that it puts the weight on my hips and legs, not my back.

My regular, non-photo is a Mountainsmith Lumbar Pack. (external link) I think my older pack is equivalent to the current "Day".

My first photo waistpack was a Lowe Inverse 200 (external link), which I hauled on daytrips all over SE Alaska. Not bad, and certainly a good value at $60. Some details not so good; waterbottle pockets are hard to access with a good-sized bottle, no place for a sandwich unless you like them flat, not enough small pockets.

I'm pretty happy with my second waistpack, a ThinkTank Speed Freak. (external link) It's in the middle of their range of sizes, there is one larger and one smaller. It's part of their modular system, you can hang stuff on the belt, I usually have a large front pocket and a waterbottle holder on the front.

Whatever suits you, your mileage may vary, but for some people a waistpack is the best. Especially if you really want to kick and glide for XC, a backpack seems to move counter to the way you'd want it to go. They can also be rigged as a chest pack with some backpacking systems, which also makes them available for daytrips on layover days.


From the upper left corner of the U.S.
Photos, Video & Pano r us.
College and workshop instructor in video and audio.
70D, Sigma 8mm, Tokina f2.8 11-16, Canon EF-S f2.8 17-55, Sigma f2.8 50-150 EX OS, Tamron 150-600VC. Gigapan Epic Pro, Nodal Ninja 5 & R10.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Hogloff
Cream of the Crop
7,606 posts
Likes: 415
Joined Apr 2003
Location: British Columbia
     
Sep 06, 2016 19:14 |  #23
bannedPermanent ban

sawsedge wrote in post #18083611 (external link)
I am comfortable with my F-stop Loka all day, fully loaded with 3-4 lenses and water for 5 people. I have no problems with my back or shoulders.

Is there room in the pack for rain gear, food, emergency medical equipment etc...

I find any pack made specifically for photography has very little extra room left for things that are essential on day treks...not even talking about overnight trips.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
J ­ Lee
Member
32 posts
Likes: 3
Joined Apr 2016
     
Sep 06, 2016 19:15 as a reply to  @ post 18077262 |  #24

Looks interesting. But I didn't see what the insert looks like.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Scrumhalf
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,427 posts
Gallery: 61 photos
Likes: 3910
Joined Jul 2012
Location: Portland OR USA
     
Sep 06, 2016 19:15 |  #25

I am in the process of writing up my review for the Gregory Tarhee. Will try to post by tonight.


Sam
5D4 | 6D | 7D2 (2 bodies) | Reasonably good glass
Gear List

If I don't get the shots I want with the gear I have, the only optics I need to examine is the mirror on the bathroom wall. The root cause will be there.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sawsedge
Senior Member
Avatar
800 posts
Gallery: 7 photos
Likes: 76
Joined Dec 2011
Location: United States
Post edited over 3 years ago by sawsedge.
     
Sep 06, 2016 20:52 |  #26

Hogloff wrote in post #18119359 (external link)
Is there room in the pack for rain gear, food, emergency medical equipment etc...

I find any pack made specifically for photography has very little extra room left for things that are essential on day treks...not even talking about overnight trips.

Yes, there is room for that, but how much depends on the size of the ICU of course. This weekend I went for a hike in the mountains and carried a rain jacket in the front pocket, a thicker layer above the ICU, food, first aid (small custom kit), and 2 water bottles (edit: and sunscreen and bug repellent). I didn't need the layer but you never know.

I'm always surprised at the number of people I see on the trail carrying nothing at all.


- John

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Scrumhalf
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,427 posts
Gallery: 61 photos
Likes: 3910
Joined Jul 2012
Location: Portland OR USA
     
Sep 07, 2016 01:38 |  #27

@aressem, check my Gregory Tarhee 45 review at:

https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1466869


Sam
5D4 | 6D | 7D2 (2 bodies) | Reasonably good glass
Gear List

If I don't get the shots I want with the gear I have, the only optics I need to examine is the mirror on the bathroom wall. The root cause will be there.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Hogloff
Cream of the Crop
7,606 posts
Likes: 415
Joined Apr 2003
Location: British Columbia
     
Sep 07, 2016 08:15 |  #28
bannedPermanent ban

sawsedge wrote in post #18119450 (external link)
Yes, there is room for that, but how much depends on the size of the ICU of course. This weekend I went for a hike in the mountains and carried a rain jacket in the front pocket, a thicker layer above the ICU, food, first aid (small custom kit), and 2 water bottles (edit: and sunscreen and bug repellent). I didn't need the layer but you never know.

I'm always surprised at the number of people I see on the trail carrying nothing at all.

I have an f-stop bag and it has some extra room...but I find once it's loaded up with everything I need for the day, the weight makes it very cumbersome. I find the waist support on the f-stop bags lacking and the weight excessive.

I travelled for 3 weeks in Vietnam in May and my pack was a Osprey which was light as a feather and had a great support system. The weight was nicely distributed to my hips, off my shoulders whereas with my f-stop bag most of the weight was square on my shoulders.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Scrumhalf
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,427 posts
Gallery: 61 photos
Likes: 3910
Joined Jul 2012
Location: Portland OR USA
     
Sep 07, 2016 08:20 |  #29

I am convinced that for serious hiking/backpacking and photography, you cannot make a photography backpack work for hiking, but rather need to make a hiking backpack work for photography. It seems, based on everything I have seen, that even ostensibly hiking-oriented photo packs like f-stop are deficient in the harness/padding/ department and eventually prove to be uncomfortable for anything but short trips.


Sam
5D4 | 6D | 7D2 (2 bodies) | Reasonably good glass
Gear List

If I don't get the shots I want with the gear I have, the only optics I need to examine is the mirror on the bathroom wall. The root cause will be there.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Hogloff
Cream of the Crop
7,606 posts
Likes: 415
Joined Apr 2003
Location: British Columbia
     
Sep 07, 2016 10:46 |  #30
bannedPermanent ban

Scrumhalf wrote in post #18119828 (external link)
I am convinced that for serious hiking/backpacking and photography, you cannot make a photography backpack work for hiking, but rather need to make a hiking backpack work for photography. It seems, based on everything I have seen, that even ostensibly hiking-oriented photo packs like f-stop are deficient in the harness/padding/ department and eventually prove to be uncomfortable for anything but short trips.

Having used photo packs from F-Stop and Lowepro as well as trekking backpacks, I've come to this same conclusion. Hiking with a loaded F-Stop...you can feel the pain part way through, especially if you have any serious elevation gain.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

15,922 views & 42 likes for this thread
Hiking/backpacking camera bags?
FORUMS General Gear Talk Camera Bags, Backpacks & Cases 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is smarshall1
2201 guests, 349 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.