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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Kids & Family Talk 
Thread started 29 Aug 2016 (Monday) 15:43
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Shutter speed for children?

 
asr10user
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Aug 29, 2016 15:43 |  #1

I just came back from a trip to the park with my 1 year old who started walking. I used my Canon 85mm 1.8 along with my 6D. Sad to say, a good amount of my images were blurry or out of focus, the ones that hit really hit. I am trying to figure out if its my technique or my lens needs AFMA.

-I was shooing Av mode, Aperture of 5.6-8. Auto iso. max of 6400. Shutter speed for lots of images was 1/125 (my minimum shutter speed for Av), and AI servo mode while holding back button focus close to his eye.

-My sharpest image is the first image. Posted, settings of F5.6, 1/160, Iso 125

-Second image is similar to most of my softer images, Image settings are F8.0, 1/160, Iso 320

So in regards to the second image, Is the difference due to Iso 125 vs 320? Is everything fine but my subject keeps moving so I should try 1/250-1/500? Is AI servo causing an issue using non center focus point (6D is notorious for its great center point but not so great other focus points), or is my lens just front or rear focusing?

Thanks!

IMAGE: https://c8.staticflickr.com/9/8192/29244128831_7ca2acb236_h.jpg


IMAGE: https://c2.staticflickr.com/9/8253/29244124681_e011cc4b70_h.jpg

6D, 50mm Art
G7, 14-42mm, 25mm 1.7, 42.5mm 1.7

  
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MalVeauX
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Aug 29, 2016 15:50 |  #2

Heya,

You can get a sharp image of a kid at 1/50s, if they're not moving. A sitting still child, even just slightly moving their head or talking even, will be sharp at 1/60s~1/100s. It looks to me like what's causing your issue is that you move a lot, more so than the child in these photos, and you're moving forward/backwards sway and side to side sway are introducing motion blur as it's in the entire photo, not just the child.

AI servo can be a great tool to get focus on something moving, and can be used on something static, but if you take an image as it transitions from in focus to out of focus in an attempt to "track" with errors, you'll get out of focus shots.

To eliminate some issues and boil it down to what is really causing all this, here's some suggestions to simplify:

1. Return to the shutter botton for AF & exposure (assuming you're using back button focus, if you aren't, just leave it and ignore this).
2. Use one-shot for focus instead of AI servo (this way it will focus, lock, and expose in one press to avoid your movements; ignore this if you already do this).
3. Increase shutter speed. Your camera can handle ISO 1600 and less with no apparent noise pretty much, so use that to keep a shutter over 1/400s and you shouldn't have any motion issues.

Again the above is just to rule out other issues to find out if it's you, your lens, your technique, your settings, etc.

Very best,


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asr10user
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Post edited over 1 year ago by asr10user.
     
Aug 29, 2016 16:03 as a reply to  @ MalVeauX's post |  #3

Great post. Thank you, I will try that when I get some time. I have been using Back button focus for so long that it actually might be causing me to move. Also, when using AI servo, I typically use one focus point, I am wondering if people typically use the auto focus point selector when in AI servo.


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mike_d
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Post edited over 1 year ago by mike_d.
     
Aug 30, 2016 18:39 |  #4

asr10user wrote in post #18110528 (external link)
Great post. Thank you, I will try that when I get some time. I have been using Back button focus for so long that it actually might be causing me to move. Also, when using AI servo, I typically use one focus point, I am wondering if people typically use the auto focus point selector when in AI servo.

Your 6D has one GOOD AF point: The center one. Stick with that, especially when using servo mode on a moving subject. You can always shoot wide and crop. This is what I did a lot on my original 5D which had a similar AF system as your 6D. Avoid focusing and recomposing when the shooting distance is short and the apertures large as this will throw your focus plane off the eyes.

Yes, you can get sharp shots of kids at 1/60', but awake stationary kids are a bit like unicorns. At least in my house. Keep the shutter speed up and your keeper rate will increase.




  
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Talley
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Sep 05, 2016 14:22 |  #5

You have to be really still on the 85 to shoot at 1/125. I have 4 kids and will regularly shoot them down to 1/15 if need be. It's all about timing. Take this shot for example she was moving around a ton and just at the right moment she was still and I captured this at 1/30. Typically I'm shooting at 1/160 though or higher but I also watch my ISO and try to keep it as low as possible in most situations.

The 85 1.8 really needs 1/160 just for handholding abilities. Even my Sigma 85 1.4 I always shot at 1/160... 1/125 was OK for the most part but at 1/100 I was never steady enough to get consistent results. This shot was taken at 70mm on my Tamron so the VC helped out here.


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Sep 05, 2016 14:41 |  #6

so I should try 1/250-1/500

In a nutshell, go straight to 1/1000!

6Ds' noise handling at high ISO settings, in fact, any modern DSLRs' noise handling at high ISO settings, is such that the need to shoot at slow shutter speeds to keep ISO setting down is almost irrelevant. I notice many of your settings are low shutter speeds, with also very low ISO speeds. (sub ISO 200) There is simply no reason or logic to losing shots due to low shutter speeds by setting the ISO so low. Bump ISO and get your shutter speeds up!

I walk out the door on a bright sunny day with ISO 400 set as a starting point, and have no problem at all bumping up exponentially to keep shutter speeds in a range that will work for my subject. Since the 1D3, we have not really been able to see a difference in IQ/Noise between ISO 100 - 400. On a 6D, I would imagine anyone would be hard pressed to see the noise difference between ISO 100 and 800.

ie: Get your shutters speeds up! If you want to stop action, 1/1000 is a good place to start.
You've essentially via experiment already learned this lesson, so we can only offer our agreement of what you learned.

Do not confuse what you need to shoot a focal length and tame hand held camera shake , for what is required to stop a subjects action. They are not remotely the same. Yes I can shoot 1/60 @ 400mm and get good results, of a statue! A moving subject requires shutter speed. Camera shake, IS, tripods, do not help. Only shutter speed will suffice to stop motion.

One can of course time shots for the pauses to get good results @ 1/160-1/250, but if you want to get more keepers, shoot faster.

Lastly, noise is no big deal. It can either be handled/reduced, or in fact ignored. A blurry photo due to low shutter speed on the other hand is not easily fixed.


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Talley
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Sep 05, 2016 14:51 |  #7

This is true. I can tolerate noise... I can't tolerate motion blur that was unwanted. You can fix the noise to a degree... motion blur is forever motion blur.


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Shutter speed for children?
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Kids & Family Talk 
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