Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Transportation 
Thread started 24 Sep 2016 (Saturday) 12:25
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

H is for Hawker!

 
BigAl007
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
7,974 posts
Gallery: 542 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 1602
Joined Dec 2010
Location: Repps cum Bastwick, Gt Yarmouth, Norfolk, UK.
Post edited over 2 years ago by BigAl007.
     
Sep 24, 2016 12:25 |  #1

Hawkers were formed in the aftermath of the first world war. The Sopwith Aviation Company went bust, and the assets were bought by the Sopwith test pilot Harry Hawker along with three others including T O M Sopwith. So was formed H.G. Hawker Engineering in 1920. Hawker would go on to provide the RAF with some of it's most significant fighter and ground attack aircraft for the next fifty years. In November 1923 Sidney Camm (later Sir Sidney) joined Hawker as a senior draughtsman, and his first design for the company was the 1924 Hawker Cygnet. Amazingly the last design that he worked on is still, in a later mark, in front line operational service with the USMC! But that will need to wait for part two.

IMAGE: https://c3.staticflickr.com/9/8343/29093790114_acb989a22a_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/LjVh​bW  (external link) Hawker Cygnet (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

The Cygnet was designed as an entrant for the 1924 Lympne trials, a competition for light aircraft run by the Royal Aero Club, with two aircraft being built, and they came 3rd and 4th. The two aircraft were entered in the competition in the two following years, were they finished 1st and 2nd each time. Only one of the original aircraft is left, and is on display at the RAF Museum Cosford. The aircraft pictured is one of two replicas that can be seen at the Shuttleworth Collection.

Now we have the first of the many types operated by the RAF, the Hawker Hart light bomber. First flown in 1928 it entered service with the RAF in 1930, where it turned out to be faster than the then newly introduced into service Bristol Bulldog front line fighter, not the last time that a bomber would prove to be faster than contemporary fighters.

IMAGE: https://c1.staticflickr.com/4/3790/9213060488_db782fe27c_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/f38k​Uu  (external link) Hawker Hart Mk II (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Next up we have the Tomtit, a basic trainer that served in only small numbers with the RAF, as the eventual winner of the contract for trainers was Avro, with their Tutor design. Even so 24 aircraft of the type served with the RAF, and were in service until 1939. The only surviving example of the type, and the last aircraft produced for the RAF, is also at the Shuttleworth collection, and is fully airworthy. Hawkers might have sold the Tomtit on the civilian market, but they were already fully committed to production of the Hart light bomber. The Tomtit is the upper of the two aircraft in the photo, along with the eventual winner of the contract, the Tutor.
IMAGE: https://c2.staticflickr.com/9/8057/29640157521_dbfc7e9704_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/Macy​bD  (external link) Hawker Tomtit, Avro Tutor (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Now we get to the 1930's and the first of Camm's fighter designs to feature in this post. At one point during the 1930's 84% of the aircraft types in service with the RAF were Camm designs. We start this 30's fighter section with the Nimrod a naval fighter aircraft. There were two main versions of the Nimrod, and fortunately the two surviving examples are one of each marque. The MK II is most easily distinguished by the slightly swept upper wings, while the MK I had straight wings.

IMAGE: https://c6.staticflickr.com/9/8529/8644242421_7e84a9eaea_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eaS1​7r  (external link) Hawker Nimrod Mk I, Hawker Nimrod Mk II (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr Hawker Siddley, a successor to Hawkers did also produce the Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft, but that was actually based on the DeHaviland Comet C4 airliner.

From just about the same time period as the Nimrod we now have the Fury, the most advanced of Hawkers famous stable of biplane fighters. You may well see a very strong familial appearance between both the fighters and two seater light bombers. This is probably because of the new construction techniques used by Camm, as well as the use of the Roll Royce series of inline V12 Kestrel engines, as much as Camm's preferences.

IMAGE: https://c3.staticflickr.com/2/1671/25801773242_ba383b30ca_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/Fj1Q​gm  (external link) Hawker Fury Mk I (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr Although by far the best fighter in RAF service at the time, it was bought in relativly small numbers, thanks to the difficuties of the economic depression of the period, so the much slower Bristol Bulldog remained in service with far more squadrons. This Fury was delivered in 1935 and served with 43 Sqn where it was flown by Flying Officer Frederick Rosier, later to be Air Chief Marshal Sir Frederick Rosier. It remained in service with the Sqn until 1939.

As mentioned when the Hawker Hart light bomber entered service it was considerably faster than the then in service Bristol Bulldog. The single seat fighter Fury was expensive, and so because of this a two seat fighter version of the Hart was developed. This became known as the Demon. It used a more powerful supercharged version of the RR Kestrel engine compared to the Hart. The Demon outnumbered the Fury by around two to one in RAF service.

IMAGE: https://c3.staticflickr.com/2/1652/25391749994_57bd3974d2_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/EFMm​D1  (external link) Hawker Demon (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Another variant of the Hart, and intended to replace the original in the light bomber role was the Hind. Basically a Hart incorporating many of the modifications included by other variants, such as the redesigned rear cockpit of the Demon, the Hind entered service in November 1935.

IMAGE: https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8528/8645663832_7d5faae923_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eaZh​Dw  (external link) Hawker Hind (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Since that concludes the biplanes here's a bonus of the Demon and Hind together.

IMAGE: https://c6.staticflickr.com/9/8260/8644479037_1e83eb7623_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eaTd​s2  (external link) Bomber and Escort (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Now a quick question for the mods, Part two in this thread, or start a new one, based on posting rules?

Alan

Previously in this series we had:

A is for..........
B is for .........
A is also for .......
So B is also for .......
Finally B is also for ..........
C is for .....
D is for ........
E is for ........
F is for ......
G is for:
H is for Hawker!

Just realised I left off When D is not for de Havilland

My Flickr (external link)
My new Aviation images blog site (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
PhotosGuy
Moderator
Avatar
75,776 posts
Gallery: 8 photos
Likes: 2457
Joined Feb 2004
Location: Middle of Michigan
     
Sep 24, 2016 13:22 |  #2

Good series of shots! Keep them coming!

Now a quick question for the mods, Part two in this thread, or start a new one, based on posting rules?

Technically, you should start a new thread. If someone (like me) said, "Let's see some more.", then technically you could put the images for part 2 here. So, Let's see some more! ; )
I suggest that you put links to your other threads at the end of your first post in each thread just to make it easier to find them.


FrankC - 20D, RAW, Manual everything...
Classic Carz, Racing, Air Show, Flowers.
Find the light... A few Car Lighting Tips, and MOVE YOUR FEET!
Have you thought about making your own book? // Need an exposure crutch?
New Image Size Limits: Image must not exceed 1600 pixels on any side.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Perfectly ­ Frank
I'm too sexy for my lens
4,194 posts
Gallery: 53 photos
Likes: 1530
Joined Oct 2010
     
Sep 24, 2016 14:52 |  #3

Very nice collection. 5 & 6 are super-sharp!

I don't see old planes like this at my air shows.


When you see my camera gear you'll think I'm a pro.
When you see my photos you'll know that I'm not.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
nardes
Goldmember
1,616 posts
Gallery: 327 photos
Best ofs: 5
Likes: 7790
Joined Jun 2009
Location: Australia
     
Sep 24, 2016 15:33 |  #4

Wow, stunning images. Love the processing and selective colouring in some of these. Thanks for the historical details too, they add another dimension to these shots.:-)

Cheers

Dennis




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
joeseph
"smells like turd"
Avatar
9,861 posts
Gallery: 105 photos
Likes: 1827
Joined Jan 2004
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
     
Sep 24, 2016 17:32 |  #5

Another fantastic set Alan. thanks for posting!


some fairly old canon camera stuff, canon lenses, Manfrotto "thingy", 1D MK II converted for IR, and now an M5
TF posting: here :-)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
BigAl007
THREAD ­ STARTER
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
7,974 posts
Gallery: 542 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 1602
Joined Dec 2010
Location: Repps cum Bastwick, Gt Yarmouth, Norfolk, UK.
     
Sep 24, 2016 18:05 |  #6

nardes wrote in post #18139102 (external link)
Wow, stunning images. Love the processing and selective colouring in some of these. Thanks for the historical details too, they add another dimension to these shots.:-)

Cheers

Dennis

no selective colouring here, just some not very nice typical UK grey skies, and plain silver doped finish. The last image is a straight up black and white conversion, the rest are full colour images.

Alan


My Flickr (external link)
My new Aviation images blog site (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
BigAl007
THREAD ­ STARTER
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
7,974 posts
Gallery: 542 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 1602
Joined Dec 2010
Location: Repps cum Bastwick, Gt Yarmouth, Norfolk, UK.
     
Sep 27, 2016 15:37 |  #7

Part 2!

So now we move to the aircraft that began life as the Fury Monoplane, and went on to become the most successful, and prolific fighter type used in both the Battle of France, and then the Battle of Britain. Designed to carry eight .303" Browning machineguns they carried at least twice the firepower of the oder biplanes. This is the only surviving Hurricane from the Battle of Britain period. It was shot down and spent some 60 odd years buried on a French beach, before being recovered and fully restored. The aircraft now lives at the Shuttleworth Collection.

IMAGE: https://c2.staticflickr.com/9/8177/28774448553_d0140b4550_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/KQGz​4X  (external link) Hawker Hurricane Mk I (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

It quickly became apparent that we needed to provide fighter support to our convoys coming from the US, and with the then lack of aircraft carriers an unorthodox solution was found, in the Sea Hurricane MK Ia, which operated from CAM ships, which were merchantmen converted with a steam catapult that could launch a Hurricane. Unless the launch was within range of friendly land the pilot had to either ditch or bail out into the sea, and hope to be picked up. Unsurprisingly there are no surviving MK 1A Sea Hurricanes. The CAM ships solved the immediate problem, and the development of MAC ships, Merchant hulls converted to have a full flight deck, and so capable of launching and landing aircraft, while also being able to still carry cargo in the holds were developed. The MAC ships and also new classes of "Escort" carriers called for the introduction of Naval fighters that were actually as capable as the land based contemporaries. So was born the Sea Hurricane MK Ib, which was essentially a production Hurricane MK I converted to maritime use by the addition of Catapult Spools on the undercarriage to handle the launching, and a tail hook for landing on.

IMAGE: https://c3.staticflickr.com/2/1529/25391767914_6284065326_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/EFMr​XY  (external link) Hawker Sea Hurricane Mk Ib (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Hawker then went on to develop a replacement of the Hurricane in the medium/high altitude fighter/interceptor role, even before the Hurricane was in full production, with the aircraft that became the Typhoon, making it's first flight in April 1940. It was not really very successful in this role though due to poor high altitude performance thanks to it having a very thick wing similar to the Hurricane before it. However with the introduction of the Fw190 by the Germans it was found that the Typhoon was the only aircraft that the RAF had that was superior to it at altitudes below 16500 feet, so it got a new lease of life as a low level fighter, being rushed into service in late 1941. The Typhoon was then developed as a ground attack aircraft carrying either bombs or RP3 rockets. This is the only surviving Hawker Typhoon left, at the RAF Museum Hendon, it is a MK Ib.

IMAGE: https://c6.staticflickr.com/6/5505/9529121949_a9cd83b7cc_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/fw4e​Y2  (external link) Hawker Typhoon Mk Ib (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr (with Tornado and Phantom tails in the background)

To overcome the deficiencies of the Typhoon Hawkers redesigned the wing with a much thinner laminar flow design, similar to that used on the Spitfire and Mustang. Also because of Engine development problems that had plagued earlier aircraft developments the Air Ministry asked for 6 prototypes with 5 engine variants. In the end the Tempest, as the aircraft was renamed, was to enter service with two of those engine variants. The first in service was the MK V fitted with the Napier Saber engine as also used in the Typhoon. The MK V was the most common of the Tempest marks and served mainly in England and western europe after the invasion. The later into service MK II was fitted with the Bristol Centaurus radial engine, in a manner very similar to the Fw190's installation. This aircraft was to have seen service as part of Tiger Force which would have seen them operating from Okinawa alongside the Avro Lincoln bomber. The development and use of the Atomic Bomb in August 1945 lead to the surrender of Japan, and so these types did not in the end see operational service during the war.

IMAGE: https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8070/29935418856_96b5e4392c_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/MBhR​6j  (external link) Hawker Tempest Mk II (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

The last of the line of Hawker piston engined fighters was the Sea Fury, which stared out as a lightened version of the Tempest MK II for the RAF for fighter rather than ground attack duties. Although with the end of the war firmly in site the RAF dropped the requirement, as existing types would be sufficient until the wide adoption of jet power. The design was though eminently suitable as a naval aircraft for carrier operation, and so the "Fury" became the Sea Fury entering service with the FAA in 1946. If you compare the Sea Fury to the original Fury fighter, which was only 15 years old at the time you have moved from an open cockpit biplane, to an enclosed cockpit monoplane that is over twice as fast, can climb to 20000 feet twice as quickly, and is also getting on for twice the weight and significantly improved range.

IMAGE: https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7349/13609088905_d5209117ae_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/mJA8​ZT  (external link) Hawker Sea Fury T20 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Hawker's first jet fighter was also destined for naval service, rather than the RAF. Although starting out the design based on the RR Griffon powered Fury prototype the resulting jet design would end up being completely different in almost every respect. As well as being the first jet it was also Hawkers first type to use a nose wheel tricycle undercarriage. Although the RAF were not interested the Hawker design was able to carry a very large internal fuel load compared to the other competing early jet designs, so it attracted the attention of an indifferent Admiralty. The Sea Hawk as the design would become known was the second Jet aircraft to enter service with the FAA. Operationally the Sea Hawk's major action with the FAA was the Suez Crisis, where it operated very successfully, and was used to provide all of the British ground attack operations. The Sea Hawk was also a reasonably good international seller, most notably with the Indian navy, where it remained in service until 1983 when it was replaced by the Sea Harrier.

IMAGE: https://c8.staticflickr.com/9/8108/8642739447_a107ffe535_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eaJi​k6  (external link) Hawker Sea Hawk FGA 6 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Hawker's first jet design that saw service with the RAF would go on to become one of the best known, and longest serving jet fighters ever, the Hawker Hunter, as well as it's service with the RAF it also served with many overseas air forces. Entering service with the RAF in July 1954 the last Hunters were retired from front line operations in the Lebanon in 2014! It would be very difficult to mention all of the Hunters achievements here, including at one point holding the World Air Speed Record. The Hunter that I have chosen to show you is one that was operated by both the RAF and the Swiss Air Force, but the owner has decided that he would rather have a non military paint scheme, so the aircraft gained her name: Miss Demeanour! Because to many that paint scheme is a crime :). The worlds fastest convertible, G-PSST (Personal Super Sonic Transport, as the Hunter is capable of breaking the sound barrier in a shallow dive).

IMAGE: https://c6.staticflickr.com/9/8257/8643455853_38b02d0fbf_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eaMY​hV  (external link) Hawker Hunter Mk 58A (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Now we come to the last design that Camm worked on at Hawkers, and actually although the prototype bore the Hawker name, by the time it was in full production it was Hawker Siddeley, although the group had actually borne that name since the 1930's. I am of course referring to the unique Harrier VSTOL ground attack fighter, still in front line service in its MD AV8B version. The world's first operational vertical takeoff and landing fixed wing aircraft. Unlike the other VTOL types of it's day the Harrier was able to do it with only a single engine. It's unique Vectored Thrust system also allows the aircraft to have incredible acceleration, and even more importantly deceleration. The Harrier can keep it's engine at full RPM's and simply change the direction of the thrust to change speed quickly, especially since the thrust can be deflected slightly forwards. This allows the Harrier to seemingly virtually stop dead in the air, while also quickly gaining some height, while a perusing aircraft simply passes underneath. The the thrust can be quickly swung back rewards to then accelerate the Harrier after the now pursued aircraft. Any normal aircraft would have to close the throttles, and usually then wait a bit while the engine winds down so slow up, and of course there is then the matter of waiting for the engine to wind back up to then pull away from the Harrier that is now behind you. Unfortunately as we no longer have any Harriers in service, and my photograph collection is limited to my Post 2005 digital collection I do not have any in flight shots of the Harrier. So here is a Harrier GR5 on display at IWM Duxford.

IMAGE: https://c4.staticflickr.com/9/8381/8644181995_f50febf1e6_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eaRG​9B  (external link) BAe Harrier GR3 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr.

So that closes our look at Hawkers.

Alan

My Flickr (external link)
My new Aviation images blog site (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
joeseph
"smells like turd"
Avatar
9,861 posts
Gallery: 105 photos
Likes: 1827
Joined Jan 2004
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
     
Sep 29, 2016 22:39 |  #8

Some excellent stuff! thanks Alan.


some fairly old canon camera stuff, canon lenses, Manfrotto "thingy", 1D MK II converted for IR, and now an M5
TF posting: here :-)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
cicopo
Goldmember
Avatar
3,448 posts
Gallery: 174 photos
Likes: 383
Joined Mar 2007
Location: Ottawa, Ont, Canada
     
Sep 30, 2016 09:50 |  #9

VERY NICE. I've posted the link to my Facebook page which is primarily for my R/C event coverage. They'll enjoy your research & the photos.

Larry


A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

5,156 views & 11 likes for this thread
H is for Hawker!
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Transportation 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is Gianpaolo
864 guests, 343 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.