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FORUMS General Gear Talk Camera Bags, Backpacks & Cases 
Thread started 25 Jul 2016 (Monday) 13:28
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Hiking/backpacking camera bags?

 
sawsedge
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Nov 08, 2016 22:16 |  #46

NWPhil wrote in post #18179373 (external link)
I guess they did not have the Targhee 45?
far from perfect, but for me rear access IS the most adequate solution while hiking, as it will keep the straps clean. Actually, almost like the lowepro, you can swing it to the front an reach for the zipper and grab a lens without having to put it down - requires a bit of practice to say the least.
There are no dedicated straps for a tripod, but I solved that issue with ammo grab bags - they are set with straps for mole attaching , so they can go on the side and or the waist belt.
Like most camera bags, F-Stop are overpriced - to me their main issue is the one-size-fits all; so some bags will be too long in shorter torsos, and vice-versa. No sizing is allowed or provided. The belt itself, does not follow the body/hips contour - it's simply attached from the edge of side-back vertical seam.
at current price and weigh, the top and side panels should be waterproof
So, for some they will fit properly, and if you have a short tripod and don't need to carry more than one liter of water, they can be ok.
One has to try a bag and take it out - there are no perfect solutions, and everyone has different needs.

ps: I find the icu a PITA after all - zip for access and then zip again to reach gear - lens wraps or/and pouches are way more versatile, furthermore allowing for a better weight distribution.


I didn't get a chance to look at the Targhee, was short on time. It might be in the store; I just didn't see it. I spotted the Osprey and Deuter bags right away. I only got to try on the Osprey Kamber 42. I plan to go back and look at more models later.

The wrap idea is interesting, because the shapes of some of these bags will never allow anything cubic like an ICU to fit. That got me thinking. What size wraps do you use for what size lenses? What do you do for the camera itself? Filters? Batteries?

My one disappointment with the snowpacks is that none seem to have side stretch pockets. But I'm not carrying skis as intended.

Regarding the ICU, I pulled out the top pads and wrapped them under the ICU, so I only open the main panel like any other pack. Any small items I carry in the main compartment have to go into other bags that can't fall down the sides or into the ICU.


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Hogloff
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Nov 09, 2016 07:36 |  #47

Charlie wrote in post #18179730 (external link)
I have no issues climbing with my belt kit, backpacks are cumbersome and slow. Sometimes I will use a backpack on top of my belt system if I need food, but mostly not.

What type of gear do people hike with?

For a day outing I have the following on top of camera equipment:

- rain jacket
- food
- liter of water
- emergency 1st aid kit
- sun screen / bug repellent
- wool sweater
- phone
- hiking poles
- gloves
- water purifier
- matches / candles


Obviously if you just go out for a couple hours on a heavily used trail, you don't need much extra gear, but if you go into the back country you better be prepared for an emergency.




  
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Charlie
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Nov 09, 2016 08:18 |  #48

Hogloff wrote in post #18179968 (external link)
For a day outing I have the following on top of camera equipment:

- rain jacket
- food
- liter of water
- emergency 1st aid kit
- sun screen / bug repellent
- wool sweater
- phone
- hiking poles
- gloves
- water purifier
- matches / candles

Obviously if you just go out for a couple hours on a heavily used trail, you don't need much extra gear, but if you go into the back country you better be prepared for an emergency.

yep, should be more clear about the types of hike. Around my area, all I have are cliffs, and many consider Los angeles area as the greatest place to hike due to it's diverse trails and areas. From exploring sea caves to city skylines, there's quite a bit of option all within a 30 minute drive.


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SailingAway
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Nov 09, 2016 11:08 |  #49

Charlie wrote in post #18179730 (external link)
I have no issues climbing with my belt kit, backpacks are cumbersome and slow. Sometimes I will use a backpack on top of my belt system if I need food, but mostly not.

What type of gear do people hike with?

Somewhere early in this thread I posted about my experience with belt packs. I hike with them. I XC ski with them. I travel with them. When backpacking, I tie off a belt pack to the backpack.

Really *dislike* carrying a back pack, too warm, too awkward, sometimes enough to throw you off balance when rock-hopping or such. Especially since with all that room it's easy to throw too much, way too much into it.

The primary current belt pack is a TT Speed Racer. It integrates with their belt pouches, so, I have some expandability. Clothing gets tied to it. Lunch and water are in accessory pouches. Tripod is in a cloth case across my back. If the camera gear doesn't fit inside the belt pack, it doesn't come.

That's a compromise of course. The super-telephoto doesn't make it unless it's a purposeful trip, but, I don't much find random wildlife that I'd want it for *unless* I'm going to where the critters live. But the belt pack is going to easily cover the range from ultra-wide to telephoto (11-250mm on crop) plus all the accessories.

The compromises are:
I have to choose between the fisheye 8mm (spherical panos) and the 60mm macro. I can't easily take both. Usually the macro wins.
No super-telephoto unless its case is on a shoulder strap. Tying it to the belt is really only good for city, not for serious walking.
Really only have room for one meal, but plenty of snacks. Fine for dayhiking - I'm not doing 17 mile days!
It's the lightweight slow telephoto, not the premium f2.8 telephoto that fits. But hey, it's daylight!
I'm thinking about a lighter weight and slower ultra wide. I could save a pound there, and a pound is a lot to me.

Having posted to this thread previously though, it seems that others want to have everything, including their best & heaviest gear. Whatever works is good. For me, I'd rather go light and far. I'll save the backpack fulla' goodies for walks in exceptional locations that are close to parking!


From the upper left corner of the U.S.
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College and workshop instructor in video and audio.
70D, Sigma 8mm, Tokina f2.8 11-16, Canon EF-S f2.8 17-55, Sigma f2.8 50-150 EX OS, Tamron 150-600VC. Gigapan Epic Pro, Nodal Ninja 5 & R10.

  
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Hogloff
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Nov 09, 2016 11:43 |  #50

SailingAway wrote in post #18180078 (external link)
Somewhere early in this thread I posted about my experience with belt packs. I hike with them. I XC ski with them. I travel with them. When backpacking, I tie off a belt pack to the backpack.

Really *dislike* carrying a back pack, too warm, too awkward, sometimes enough to throw you off balance when rock-hopping or such. Especially since with all that room it's easy to throw too much, way too much into it.

The primary current belt pack is a TT Speed Racer. It integrates with their belt pouches, so, I have some expandability. Clothing gets tied to it. Lunch and water are in accessory pouches. Tripod is in a cloth case across my back. If the camera gear doesn't fit inside the belt pack, it doesn't come.

That's a compromise of course. The super-telephoto doesn't make it unless it's a purposeful trip, but, I don't much find random wildlife that I'd want it for *unless* I'm going to where the critters live. But the belt pack is going to easily cover the range from ultra-wide to telephoto (11-250mm on crop) plus all the accessories.

The compromises are:
I have to choose between the fisheye 8mm (spherical panos) and the 60mm macro. I can't easily take both. Usually the macro wins.
No super-telephoto unless its case is on a shoulder strap. Tying it to the belt is really only good for city, not for serious walking.
Really only have room for one meal, but plenty of snacks. Fine for dayhiking - I'm not doing 17 mile days!
It's the lightweight slow telephoto, not the premium f2.8 telephoto that fits. But hey, it's daylight!
I'm thinking about a lighter weight and slower ultra wide. I could save a pound there, and a pound is a lot to me.

Having posted to this thread previously though, it seems that others want to have everything, including their best & heaviest gear. Whatever works is good. For me, I'd rather go light and far. I'll save the backpack fulla' goodies for walks in exceptional locations that are close to parking!

You say one drawback of a backpack is the tendency to throw to much into it...well look at the compromises you have when using a belt pack.

You say you would rather go light and far with the belt pack and save the backpack for easy walks near the parking lot. I see this totally opposite to you. When you venture out far and away...that is when you need the emergency kit, the water, the extra clothes etc... When I'm close to my vehicle is when I go very light...sometimes just carrying my camera attached to a tripod over my shoulder.

I also find properly fitted back packs ( trekking packs not the heavy photo packs ) which are cinched up properly to your body, you have no sway or extra pull from the pack making it much more stable to be crossing streams and such than having something front hanging from your belt.




  
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AnnieMacD
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Nov 09, 2016 12:12 |  #51

Hogloff wrote in post #18180098 (external link)
You say one drawback of a backpack is the tendency to throw to much into it...well look at the compromises you have when using a belt pack.

You say you would rather go light and far with the belt pack and save the backpack for easy walks near the parking lot. I see this totally opposite to you. When you venture out far and away...that is when you need the emergency kit, the water, the extra clothes etc... When I'm close to my vehicle is when I go very light...sometimes just carrying my camera attached to a tripod over my shoulder.

I also find properly fitted back packs ( trekking packs not the heavy photo packs ) which are cinched up properly to your body, you have no sway or extra pull from the pack making it much more stable to be crossing streams and such than having something front hanging from your belt.

+1


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Charlie
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Nov 09, 2016 12:22 |  #52

SailingAway wrote in post #18180078 (external link)
Somewhere early in this thread I posted about my experience with belt packs. I hike with them. I XC ski with them. I travel with them. When backpacking, I tie off a belt pack to the backpack.

Really *dislike* carrying a back pack, too warm, too awkward, sometimes enough to throw you off balance when rock-hopping or such. Especially since with all that room it's easy to throw too much, way too much into it.

The primary current belt pack is a TT Speed Racer. It integrates with their belt pouches, so, I have some expandability. Clothing gets tied to it. Lunch and water are in accessory pouches. Tripod is in a cloth case across my back. If the camera gear doesn't fit inside the belt pack, it doesn't come.

That's a compromise of course. The super-telephoto doesn't make it unless it's a purposeful trip, but, I don't much find random wildlife that I'd want it for *unless* I'm going to where the critters live. But the belt pack is going to easily cover the range from ultra-wide to telephoto (11-250mm on crop) plus all the accessories.

The compromises are:
I have to choose between the fisheye 8mm (spherical panos) and the 60mm macro. I can't easily take both. Usually the macro wins.
No super-telephoto unless its case is on a shoulder strap. Tying it to the belt is really only good for city, not for serious walking.
Really only have room for one meal, but plenty of snacks. Fine for dayhiking - I'm not doing 17 mile days!
It's the lightweight slow telephoto, not the premium f2.8 telephoto that fits. But hey, it's daylight!
I'm thinking about a lighter weight and slower ultra wide. I could save a pound there, and a pound is a lot to me.

Having posted to this thread previously though, it seems that others want to have everything, including their best & heaviest gear. Whatever works is good. For me, I'd rather go light and far. I'll save the backpack fulla' goodies for walks in exceptional locations that are close to parking!

I had the speed racer at one time, now I have the full belt system instead, and its spectacular. Most the time it's a single setup, left side with the skin bag to house lenses, right side, small holster. Lens changes are super quick, camera is always available.... been shooting belt system for 3+ years now, love it as much as the day I switched over. It took me some time to find the right belt system, have lowepro, which is super duty and comfy, but too big. Had a few other beltpacks including speed racer, generally not big enough or too much on one side. Tried the think tank belt, and it was game set match, so good.


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NWPhil
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Nov 09, 2016 12:34 |  #53

Charlie wrote in post #18179730 (external link)
I have no issues climbing with my belt kit, backpacks are cumbersome and slow. Sometimes I will use a backpack on top of my belt system if I need food, but mostly not.

What type of gear do people hike with?

climbing only, it's a whole new issue - assuming you are talking about vertical climbing.
sometimes people refer to climbing a mountain as a walking the whole way to the top with or without technical gear.

as far as hiking, outside city parks, and similar managed locations, anything that it's consider remote and/or wilderness I carry the "10 essentials" adjusted to season, location, mileage and excursion time/length
I am sure you are familiar with the concept of reaching the summit being just half-time :) - so, the destination is as important as the journey while hiking, and you just have to be prepared as best as one can IMO

while hiking only for a day, I might carry a 1Dx with a 24-105 or 16-35 attached, and maybe an extra lens or two inside the pack. Sometimes just a P&S if I know the views are not that great and/or expect low visibility.
Backpacking is more complicated - survival gear comes first, and then it's a toss between a comfort/luxury item vs an extra lens (LOL), not to mention asking myself how much I am willing to 'suffer' in order to carry a piece of (photo) gear


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SailingAway
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Nov 09, 2016 13:53 |  #54

Hogloff wrote in post #18180098 (external link)
You say one drawback of a backpack is the tendency to throw to much into it...well look at the compromises you have when using a belt pack.

You say you would rather go light and far with the belt pack and save the backpack for easy walks near the parking lot. I see this totally opposite to you. When you venture out far and away...that is when you need the emergency kit, the water, the extra clothes etc... When I'm close to my vehicle is when I go very light...sometimes just carrying my camera attached to a tripod over my shoulder.

I also find properly fitted back packs ( trekking packs not the heavy photo packs ) which are cinched up properly to your body, you have no sway or extra pull from the pack making it much more stable to be crossing streams and such than having something front hanging from your belt.

Good points, to be sure. How much is enough is going to be an individual call. Much of the point of my post was to examine what photo gear I need and will carry.

I'm not shorting the safety gear, going out with excellent nav skills, map, compass, altimeter, and a trail plan. A cell phone with GPS, too, though I learned land and sea nav long before GPS. I'm an experienced bushwhacker, and comfortable with off-trail adventures. I'm taking clothing suitable for an unexpected overnight, and, here in the PNW, good rain gear. I've been snowed out on a backpack on the 4th of July. In my relative youth I got an exciting helicopter rescue ride. Not looking for any repeats!

At the same time, different regions of the US and world are different. Here in the upper left corner of the US it's difficult to really get away from people and rescue on a day hike.

The 10 essential are important, and I carry them. But, I don't need a backpack with a 70-200 f2.8 lens for a day hike on clear trails, I prefer the belt pack. I'm not saying you should, but, there *is* a tendency to carry all the stuff we *might* need and then a bit more. I started out backpacking with a 55+ lb. pack. Over decades I learned more about what I would actually use every time, plus some gear for contingencies. I never got to the sub-25 lb. range that many ultralight backpackers achieve, but I did get under 35 lbs. That thinking carries over to my camera gear for walking.


From the upper left corner of the U.S.
Photos, Video & Pano r us.
College and workshop instructor in video and audio.
70D, Sigma 8mm, Tokina f2.8 11-16, Canon EF-S f2.8 17-55, Sigma f2.8 50-150 EX OS, Tamron 150-600VC. Gigapan Epic Pro, Nodal Ninja 5 & R10.

  
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Nethawked
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Nov 09, 2016 14:57 |  #55

Hogloff wrote in post #18119359 (external link)
Is there room in the pack for rain gear, food, emergency medical equipment etc...

I find any pack made specifically for photography has very little extra room left for things that are essential on day treks...not even talking about overnight trips.

The only one I've used (and still do) that carries everything I'm comfortable with is the Clik Elite Contrejour. I've gone out loaded with equipment & gear for a couple of overnight trips.




  
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Hogloff
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Nov 09, 2016 15:05 |  #56

SailingAway wrote in post #18180170 (external link)
Good points, to be sure. How much is enough is going to be an individual call. Much of the point of my post was to examine what photo gear I need and will carry.

I'm not shorting the safety gear, going out with excellent nav skills, map, compass, altimeter, and a trail plan. A cell phone with GPS, too, though I learned land and sea nav long before GPS. I'm an experienced bushwhacker, and comfortable with off-trail adventures. I'm taking clothing suitable for an unexpected overnight, and, here in the PNW, good rain gear. I've been snowed out on a backpack on the 4th of July. In my relative youth I got an exciting helicopter rescue ride. Not looking for any repeats!

At the same time, different regions of the US and world are different. Here in the upper left corner of the US it's difficult to really get away from people and rescue on a day hike.

The 10 essential are important, and I carry them. But, I don't need a backpack with a 70-200 f2.8 lens for a day hike on clear trails, I prefer the belt pack. I'm not saying you should, but, there *is* a tendency to carry all the stuff we *might* need and then a bit more. I started out backpacking with a 55+ lb. pack. Over decades I learned more about what I would actually use every time, plus some gear for contingencies. I never got to the sub-25 lb. range that many ultralight backpackers achieve, but I did get under 35 lbs. That thinking carries over to my camera gear for walking.

I was just noting that if you are out far enough from civilization on your trek...you should be bringing more than just your photo gear. There is no way I could fit all my extra clothes and safety equipment I to a belt pack...so I choose to carry a trekking pack with my gear in wraps.

I Cross country ski a lot. One time I got off work early and decided to go for a quick 1 hour ski before it got dark. 8 km out I had a bad fall and severely ripped my hamstring to the point I could only shuffle sideways. There were no other people around. No cell coverage. It took me 5 hours to shuffle to my car where there was a care taker of a cabin. If I did not have extra dry clothes to put on, I could have easily got hyperthermia.

This was a quick 1 hour ski...but experience told me to take extra clothes with me and that experience could have saved my life...so even simple 1 hour treks could lead to problems.

With a back pack, you can always be prepared for problems...sort of like buckling the seat belt even for a 1 minute trip to the corner store.:-)




  
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NWPhil
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Nov 09, 2016 15:20 |  #57

sawsedge wrote in post #18179769 (external link)
I didn't get a chance to look at the Targhee, was short on time. It might be in the store; I just didn't see it. I spotted the Osprey and Deuter bags right away. I only got to try on the Osprey Kamber 42. I plan to go back and look at more models later.

The wrap idea is interesting, because the shapes of some of these bags will never allow anything cubic like an ICU to fit. That got me thinking. What size wraps do you use for what size lenses? What do you do for the camera itself? Filters? Batteries?

My one disappointment with the snowpacks is that none seem to have side stretch pockets. But I'm not carrying skis as intended.

Regarding the ICU, I pulled out the top pads and wrapped them under the ICU, so I only open the main panel like any other pack. Any small items I carry in the main compartment have to go into other bags that can't fall down the sides or into the ICU.

There are some neoprene bags/pouches that do a better job actually - even have a velcro latch.
regarding the wraps, I bought some similar material at a local craft store and made them to size as needed ( yes, I had a "real' one to compare)
- for small items, I prefer small gear bags, aka as stuff sacks, dry sacks, ditty sacks...
https://www.rei.com …ff-sacks&ir=q%3Agear+bags (external link)
in some instances they can be used with a wrap/pouch for lenses when wet conditions are expected
- For the camera itself, either seized neoprene case, or a large stuff sack

the reason snowpacks don't have side pockets is because the area used for skis carrying loops and bottles easily would fall off when riding on them - hence the ammo/gear grab bags solution.
The one's I got, have two mounting options - never had a problem with a 1l nalgene, or using it to support my tripod (attached to side).
I like to have one at the waist belt, as it allows me to grab some small items very easily - it has a drawstring too
similar to these below:
http://www.ebay.com …82715?hash=item​43f1b3845b (external link)


NWPhil
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SailingAway
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Nov 10, 2016 11:23 |  #58

Hogloff wrote in post #18180232 (external link)
...I Cross country ski a lot. One time I got off work early and decided to go for a quick 1 hour ski before it got dark. 8 km out I had a bad fall and severely ripped my hamstring to the point I could only shuffle sideways. There were no other people around. No cell coverage. It took me 5 hours to shuffle to my car where there was a care taker of a cabin. If I did not have extra dry clothes to put on, I could have easily got hyperthermia.

This was a quick 1 hour ski...but experience told me to take extra clothes with me and that experience could have saved my life...so even simple 1 hour treks could lead to problems...

We could trade stories, ah, the places we've been... and survived. So far.

My brother-in-law is there with you on solo wilderness adventures, and that's fine. Me, I've become quite a bit more conservative in my journey to becoming an official olde fardt. I do still solo XC once or twice a season, but only on or very near well-traveled trails. Said B in Law would rather not see tracks in front of him, ever. In fact, he won't ski the PNW. Too many people! Too much Cascades Cement! Rockies wilderness only, for him.

To each their own. We do take some interesting and sometimes life-changing lessons from venturing close to the edge in the woods. It's kind of a raggedy line between "we're having fun!", and "I *think* we'll survive this!" It sounds like we've both learned to respect that line.

For me, "we're having fun" is making do with less weighty camera gear when I have to carry it for miles. I'm also OK with looking like a yard sale on legs, with clothing tied onto my belt pack, and tied onto me.

We haven't yet talked about hats. When you come right down to it, it's all about the hat! I think most people don't know that the secret to fun *and* survival IS the hat! Or several hats. :-)


From the upper left corner of the U.S.
Photos, Video & Pano r us.
College and workshop instructor in video and audio.
70D, Sigma 8mm, Tokina f2.8 11-16, Canon EF-S f2.8 17-55, Sigma f2.8 50-150 EX OS, Tamron 150-600VC. Gigapan Epic Pro, Nodal Ninja 5 & R10.

  
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