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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 20 Nov 2016 (Sunday) 10:49
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How to achieve the type lighting?

 
KatManDEW
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Nov 20, 2016 10:49 |  #1

I want to get this type of lighting for a shoot. Do you think this was done with a octabox and honeycomb grid?

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SkipD
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Nov 20, 2016 10:56 |  #2

It appears to me that a large rectangular softbox (with the long side vertical) is used at least for a "main" light. Reflections of the light in the kerosene lamp in a few shots are what made this appear to be the case to me.


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KatManDEW
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Nov 20, 2016 11:11 |  #3

SkipD wrote in post #18189738 (external link)
It appears to me that a large rectangular softbox (with the long side vertical) is used at least for a "main" light. Reflections of the light in the kerosene lamp in a few shots are what made this appear to be the case to me.

Thank you for the reply. Do you think a grid was used in the softbox?




  
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Post edited over 1 year ago by jcolman.
     
Nov 20, 2016 11:28 |  #4

Looks like two lights were used. The key, or main light, was camera left. Another light was used on some of the shots camera right. Large soft boxes likely with grids and perhaps flags to keep the light off the background.


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KatManDEW
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Nov 20, 2016 14:40 |  #5

jcolman wrote in post #18189762 (external link)
Looks like two lights were used. The key, or main light, was camera left. Another light was used on some of the shots camera right. Large soft boxes likely with grids and perhaps flags to keep the light off the background.

Thank you! What kind of flags are used on softboxes?




  
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Nov 20, 2016 14:44 |  #6

KatManDEW wrote in post #18189959 (external link)
Thank you! What kind of flags are used on softboxes?

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Post edited over 1 year ago by -Duck-.
     
Nov 20, 2016 15:03 |  #7

Looking closely at the images I think you are closer in your assessment with the use of octoboxes. The reflections in the lantern, the milk bottle and the globe all indicate a round light source with no grid. But you must keep in mind that this particular look can be achieved in any number of ways. The key to these images are a controlled soft directional light coming in relatively low. It also appears that the background may be digital as they are exactly the same in all the photos.

Hope this helps.


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KatManDEW
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Nov 20, 2016 15:04 |  #8

Alveric wrote in post #18189966 (external link)
Plain, custom-cut pieces of black foamcore board.

Can't thank all of you enough for the replies!




  
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welshwizard1971
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Nov 20, 2016 15:12 |  #9

-Duck- wrote in post #18189979 (external link)
Looking closely at the images I think you are closer in your assessment with the use of octoboxes. The reflections in the lantern, the milk bottle and the globe all indicate a round light source with no grid. But you must keep in mind that this particular look can be achieved in any number of ways. The key to these images are a controlled soft directional light coming in relatively low. It also appears that the background may be digital as they are exactly the same in all the photos.

Hope this helps.

Looks like a backdrop to me...


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Nov 20, 2016 15:31 |  #10

Also, the lamp light effects are quite likely Photoshop additions.


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Nov 20, 2016 15:53 |  #11

looks like a setup like this


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Nov 21, 2016 20:37 |  #12

welshwizard1971 wrote in post #18189992 (external link)
Looks like a backdrop to me...

It could very well be but I didn't notice any light change from image to image. That's what led me to think it was digital. Definitely difficult to tell. Discussion aside, they are great images.


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KatManDEW
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Nov 22, 2016 07:52 |  #13

abbadon31 wrote in post #18190022 (external link)
looks like a setup like this

Thank you for the detailed reply! I will experiment with something like that.

Do you prefer octaboxes or rectangular soft boxes?




  
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KatManDEW
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Nov 22, 2016 07:55 |  #14

-Duck- wrote in post #18191119 (external link)
It could very well be but I didn't notice any light change from image to image. That's what led me to think it was digital. Definitely difficult to tell. Discussion aside, they are great images.

I think the images have a nice feel to them. I like the way the background isn't well lit. When I've done photos in situations like this the background gets too much light, and even worse I often end up with shadows on the background.




  
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dmward
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Nov 22, 2016 09:41 |  #15

The light for the linked images, like most "commercial portrait" photography hasn't changed much over the years.
A) large main light 15 to 30 degrees off lens axis.
B) large fill light close to lens axis.
C) background and/or hair (kicker) to taste.

The type of lights and modifiers used has evolved over the years. The classic setup has remained. Primarily because its faltering to the subject which sells prints.


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How to achieve the type lighting?
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