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Thread started 27 Nov 2016 (Sunday) 00:42
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Restoration of old images

 
theantiquetiger
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Nov 27, 2016 00:42 |  #1

My mother got some scans of old photographs from her dad's side of our family (including her senior photo that she doesn't have). I have never done this before, but she wanted me to re-work them. Now remember, I am working from a scan of a (poorly done) scan of the original

Mom's original senior portrait (she hated the shadow on her upper lip

IMAGE: https://c1.staticflickr.com/6/5555/31111237192_7e100be23a_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/Ppcd​Vf  (external link) mom2 (external link) by Chris Campbell (external link), on Flickr

I know her skin looks plastic, but thats all I could do to get rid of the massive dots from the poor scan that was done
IMAGE: https://c6.staticflickr.com/6/5600/31140498981_ef95637610_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/PrMc​qR  (external link) mom (external link) by Chris Campbell (external link), on Flickr

My great great grandmother (standing) and her sister (original)
IMAGE: https://c7.staticflickr.com/6/5472/31111236702_f1b2ef5901_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/Ppcd​LN  (external link) mom4 (external link) by Chris Campbell (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: https://c4.staticflickr.com/6/5796/31140498811_75ffbc7383_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/PrMc​nV  (external link) mom3 (external link) by Chris Campbell (external link), on Flickr

My Great Grandmother (daughter of the lady above) on my mother's dad side
IMAGE: https://c7.staticflickr.com/6/5801/31122877062_feed871484_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/PqdT​3E  (external link) mom6 (external link) by Chris Campbell (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: https://c3.staticflickr.com/6/5722/31122877402_cdc388275f_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/PqdT​9w  (external link) mom5 (external link) by Chris Campbell (external link), on Flickr

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Skinnifatkid
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Nov 28, 2016 11:37 |  #2

I don't mean any offense with my question, but did you use a filter to remove dust and scratches to fix the images or did you use individual tools? What program did you use to fix these?

There are a lot of good tutorials on line as well that will keep the integrity of the image/finish (matte) without changing it too much other than repair of it.

I do repair as a hobby. I have included an example of a fix I did a few years ago that was a scan of a scan.

The important thing would be that the person you do it for, your mom or yourself, are happy with the end result. I am very OCD when it comes to repair and I see flaws in my own work as well, with time and practice and the correct tools, it can be easier to manipulate the images.


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Michael ­ Ritter
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Nov 28, 2016 13:34 |  #3

You have done an awesome job in restoring those pics so well done!



  
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theantiquetiger
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Post edited over 3 years ago by theantiquetiger.
     
Nov 28, 2016 14:01 |  #4

Skinnifatkid wrote in post #18196965 (external link)
I don't mean any offense with my question, but did you use a filter to remove dust and scratches to fix the images or did you use individual tools? What program did you use to fix these?

There are a lot of good tutorials on line as well that will keep the integrity of the image/finish (matte) without changing it too much other than repair of it.

I do repair as a hobby. I have included an example of a fix I did a few years ago that was a scan of a scan.

The important thing would be that the person you do it for, your mom or yourself, are happy with the end result. I am very OCD when it comes to repair and I see flaws in my own work as well, with time and practice and the correct tools, it can be easier to manipulate the images.

thumbnail
Hosted photo: posted by Skinnifatkid in
./showthread.php?p=181​96965&i=i55458932
forum: People

thumbnail
Hosted photo: posted by Skinnifatkid in
./showthread.php?p=181​96965&i=i196278851
forum: People

I do it all in Lightroom, using the spot removal tool for the dust, scratches, etc.

You did a great job of the restoration above, but you probably have the original image and there is very little damage to the subjects in the image, making it a pretty easy restoration. I was working with a scan of a print out of a scan of the original, that looks to be printed on a Dot-Matrix printer.

The second image I posted above is damn near unrestorable, with all the lost detail in the faces and major scratches.


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Skinnifatkid
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Nov 30, 2016 12:49 as a reply to  @ theantiquetiger's post |  #5

No original, it was a scan of a scan. The thing I learned about doing the restorations is to scan the image as large as possible, zoom in as much as possible where it's needed and fix the area as best as possible. I've done quite a few and decided to spend the money on CS6 before Adobe went to the CC subscription plan.

As long as you can zoom in and work the area that needs to be replaced/fabricated/cl​eaned up etc... it can be done with some time. I've never used Lightroom to fix anything more than exposure issues. I have Elements on my work computer and works well for editing for my work stuff. It is cheaper than Adobe Photoshop of course.

For the Dot Matrix image, I'd scan it as large as possible and work the DOT's as much as possible to clean it up in order to keep it the same. For the other two, same, scan it as large as possible and work each portion of it that needs fixing. The clone tool can be helpful as well, just watch for patterns as you go.

The images here are from an original, but I don't believe it made a difference with the way I finished it.


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Intheswamp
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Nov 30, 2016 13:06 |  #6

<chuckle> Battle of the photo-restorers. :lol:


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Skinnifatkid
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Post edited over 3 years ago by Skinnifatkid.
     
Nov 30, 2016 13:11 as a reply to  @ Intheswamp's post |  #7

Nope. Just trying to help with the limited knowledge I have. The people I fixed the images for are the ones that matter. I added them to show that I'm not talking out of my butt.

No battle, I know I can do better too. (Me personally, not suggesting I can do better than OP)




  
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Intheswamp
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Nov 30, 2016 13:29 |  #8

I hope you took my post as being good-natured. I just got a chuckle out of ya'll comparing photos and edits. When I get home tonight I'll try to remember and post a couple of mine to the thread.

Patience is the key to restoring, a good job can take a good bit of time.

Ed


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lvph2
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Nov 30, 2016 13:34 |  #9

Excellent work here guys. Will have to bookmark this page in case I never need to do this!



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Skinnifatkid
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Nov 30, 2016 13:41 |  #10

Intheswamp wrote in post #18199311 (external link)
I hope you took my post as being good-natured. I just got a chuckle out of ya'll comparing photos and edits. When I get home tonight I'll try to remember and post a couple of mine to the thread.

Patience is the key to restoring, a good job can take a good bit of time.

Ed

I realised the way it seemed after you made the comment. By no means did I take it as other than "Good natured". I still have a lot to learn as well. Like how to not take so much time in doing the restorations.

Damn OCD!




  
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Intheswamp
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Nov 30, 2016 14:36 |  #11

Chris, do you mind if I post an edit of your great great grandma and her sister?

Ed


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saea501
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Post edited over 3 years ago by saea501.
     
Nov 30, 2016 15:15 |  #12

I'm sure some of you all have seen these, but they're relevant to this thread.....I did them a couple of months ago for my friend. His grandpa was a jockey in the early 1900s. Even I was surprised how they turned out.

IMAGE: https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8477/29614650441_fce7a6f273_b_d.jpg

IMAGE: https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8316/29660079736_a9ce254fa2_b_d.jpg

IMAGE: https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8195/29071003713_84cedf92ea_b_d.jpg

IMAGE: https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5443/31306095996_57e7a7f7a6_b_d.jpg

Remember what the DorMouse said.....feed your head.
Bob
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theantiquetiger
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Nov 30, 2016 16:07 as a reply to  @ Intheswamp's post |  #13

Please do, get the original size off Flickr, but it is not much bigger


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theantiquetiger
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Nov 30, 2016 16:14 |  #14

Here is the last one I did for my mom. It is of my grandfather (right) and his dad. It is actually two images cut and taped together for some reason (I don't know the story behind this). It is the original (if you want to call it that) and not a scan

IMAGE: https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5556/31277748825_727999e5a8_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/PDUD​2t  (external link) mom8 (external link) by Chris Campbell (external link), on Flickr

Granted, I couldn't do much with their shoulders and they look like Siamese Twins. I tried playing with the color but couldn't get it right, so I just went with BW

IMAGE: https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5650/30469997233_0cf0af330d_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/NqwG​BT  (external link) mom7 (external link) by Chris Campbell (external link), on Flickr

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theantiquetiger
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Nov 30, 2016 16:16 |  #15

saea501 wrote in post #18199421 (external link)
I'm sure some of you all have seen these, but they're relevant to this thread.....I did them a couple of months ago for my friend. His grandpa was a jockey in the early 1900s. Even I was surprised how they turned out.

QUOTED IMAGE

QUOTED IMAGE

QUOTED IMAGE

QUOTED IMAGE


That is simply AMAZING work!!!!


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Restoration of old images
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