Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 19 Dec 2016 (Monday) 04:18
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Getting bored of photography

 
urbanfreestyle
THREAD ­ STARTER
I am a squirrel who loves rubbing bottles and I have Nuts in my drawers, too!
Avatar
2,060 posts
Gallery: 9 photos
Likes: 226
Joined Dec 2013
Location: Exeter, Devon
     
Dec 25, 2016 06:01 |  #91

I would like to clarify, the free work at the event I do is because I have been friends with the organiser and been shooting since the event began. It has since grown a little but not massively. There are no other paid togs there and everyone does it for free. I do it free cause a lot of my friends drive there, ther are not in mega expensive cars, it's more like a community.

People snort at free togs, as do I because now I have the portfolio to backup my experience I want to start charging but the transition is very difficult.

Anyway I have made my move and got rid of some gear. Treated myself to a mint Olympus Trip 35 and a few rolls of Tri-X and Portra. I am looking forward to going out and veined in the moment.


Facebook (external link)
Canon 1D Mk IV | Canon 50mm 1.8 Mk1 | Sigma 'Bigma' 50-500 | Fuji XE1 | Helios 44/m | 50mm 1.4 | Manfrotto 055CX PRO3 | 3LT Mohawk ballhead | Lubitel 2 med format camera |

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
mcluckie
I play with fire, run with scissors and skate on thin ice all at once!
Avatar
2,065 posts
Gallery: 97 photos
Likes: 315
Joined Jul 2009
Location: Chicago, Hong Kong
Post edited over 2 years ago by mcluckie.
     
Dec 25, 2016 06:07 |  #92

urbanfreestyle wrote in post #18217391 (external link)
i was running as just a hobby for about 4 or 5 years. then started getting interest from people i had shot with so decided to try to make some money and get my name out there. Then as quickly as i had done so it all hit the fan.
I pulled back and tried to do it as hobby again but struggling to find the want to go out and shoot.

I never had that problem. I went right from another art media to photo, then photo school. It was never a hobby. But I can tell you that making money from art is a great way to get burned out, or at least lose the passion. I shot pro for maybe 6 years, but flipped to doing design. 15 years later I flipped back again.


multidisciplinary visual guy | traveler on the 8-fold path | seeker of the spark | walker of the dog
all dingus | dslr canon 5D4, 70-200LII zeiss distagon 15, 21, 25, 28, 50ƒ1.4 milvus; vario-sonnar N 24-85; makro planar 50, 100 mirrorless leica Q2 fujifilm XT-2, XT-20, 16, 18, 56, 16-55, 50-140; zeiss distagon 12, planar 32 film canon 1n hasselblad 501cm, 50, 80
<<all zooms for sale—zeiss, canon & fuji>>

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
OhLook
Spiderwoman
Avatar
18,836 posts
Gallery: 74 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 6528
Joined Dec 2012
Location: California: SF Bay Area
     
Dec 25, 2016 10:46 |  #93

mcluckie wrote in post #18223121 (external link)
I can tell you that making money from art is a great way to get burned out, or at least lose the passion.

Long ago, when I had an in-house job with a small publisher, illustration and some other artsy tasks were part of it. My work ever since has been freelance, not with art (except in a minimal way) but with text. In my experience, the motivation killer isn't art, it's self-employment. As an employee, you're in touch with other members of a group trying to get something done. That's a great help if being part of a team makes you feel that your work is more meaningful. People around you have some idea of what you're doing, even if they have other specialties. You also get to skip some of the businessy aspects that many people would like to avoid, such as negotiating and bookkeeping.


PRONOUN ADVISORY: OhLook is a she. | A FEW CORRECT SPELLINGS: lens, aperture, amateur, hobbyist, per se, raccoon, whoa, more so (2 wds.), shoo-in | IMAGE EDITING OK

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
airfrogusmc
I'm a chimper. There I said it...
36,274 posts
Gallery: 147 photos
Best ofs: 6
Likes: 5562
Joined May 2007
Location: Oak Park, Illinois
     
Dec 25, 2016 11:00 |  #94

mcluckie wrote in post #18223121 (external link)
I never had that problems I went right from another art media to photo, then photo school. It was never a hobby. But I can tell you that making money from art is a great way to get burned out, or at least lose the passion. I shot pro for maybe 6 years, but flipped to doing design. 15 years later I flipped back again.

I think you hit the nail on the head in the fact is you didn't have you personal creative outlet. If I didn't have it I would have been crisp a long time ago.

In my opinion, thats why you need to keep your art for you and separate that from what you do for clients.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
airfrogusmc
I'm a chimper. There I said it...
36,274 posts
Gallery: 147 photos
Best ofs: 6
Likes: 5562
Joined May 2007
Location: Oak Park, Illinois
Post edited over 2 years ago by airfrogusmc. (3 edits in all)
     
Dec 25, 2016 11:11 |  #95

OhLook wrote in post #18223237 (external link)
Long ago, when I had an in-house job with a small publisher, illustration and some other artsy tasks were part of it. My work ever since has been freelance, not with art (except in a minimal way) but with text. In my experience, the motivation killer isn't art, it's self-employment. As an employee, you're in touch with other members of a group trying to get something done. That's a great help if being part of a team makes you feel that your work is more meaningful. People around you have some idea of what you're doing, even if they have other specialties. You also get to skip some of the businessy aspects that many people would like to avoid, such as negotiating and bookkeeping.


And most really successful photographers i know do what they do well and have help in the areas they don't do well or really don't want to do like the left brained stuff. Most of the really successful photographers that i know with studios have studio managers that handle the business. If they do commercial work they get a rep to market them to the right clients, especially in the beginning. They all have great accountants. This leaves them to do what they got into it in the beginning for and what makes them the most $$$$. I learned these reasons from working for other really successful photographers.

Think of it like a great chef or a physician or many other professionals. Most know they can't be good at it all. No one is. So they are smart enough to ge help in those areas that others are really good at. Most chefs have either partnered with good business people that know how to run restaurants or hire good managers to run that part of the business. Dr's usually have office managers to take care of that. They all have good accountants. This leaves them to do the things that make them the most $$$$ and what they love to do. The odds of you top be able t od out all well are not good and if you spend 80% of the day doing things you hate to do you will probably not last long. I have seen them come and go over the years and many that think they can do it all fail because we are human and we probably will not be good at it all.

My advice is get help in those areas you know that you are not good at. That is SMART business.

Also I would advise if you are creative and in a creative field keep what you do for you separate from what you do for others.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bobbyz
Cream of the Crop
19,434 posts
Likes: 1614
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Bay Area, CA
     
Dec 25, 2016 11:45 |  #96

I just keep trying new hobbies. Cooking, photography, woodworking, and now gardening. You never get bored.


5dmk3, 35L, 85L II, 300mm f2.8 IS I, 400mm f5.6
Fuji XT-1, 14mm f2.8, 23mm f1.4, 35mm f1.4, 56mm f1.2, 90mm f2, 50-140mm f2.8

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Hogloff
Cream of the Crop
7,606 posts
Likes: 415
Joined Apr 2003
Location: British Columbia
     
Dec 25, 2016 13:39 |  #97
bannedPermanent ban

bobbyz wrote in post #18223274 (external link)
I just keep trying new hobbies. Cooking, photography, woodworking, and now gardening. You never get bored.

I do 3 of those hobbies ( gardening, cooking and photography ) intermingled throughout the year. Right now gardening is on hold while cooking and photography are in full gear. Once spring arrives, I focus more are gardening and less on photography. Having multiple interests keeps things fresh.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mcluckie
I play with fire, run with scissors and skate on thin ice all at once!
Avatar
2,065 posts
Gallery: 97 photos
Likes: 315
Joined Jul 2009
Location: Chicago, Hong Kong
     
Dec 27, 2016 10:41 as a reply to  @ airfrogusmc's post |  #98

Exactly. Once I flipped all my work to design, I enjoyed photo again— for myself.


multidisciplinary visual guy | traveler on the 8-fold path | seeker of the spark | walker of the dog
all dingus | dslr canon 5D4, 70-200LII zeiss distagon 15, 21, 25, 28, 50ƒ1.4 milvus; vario-sonnar N 24-85; makro planar 50, 100 mirrorless leica Q2 fujifilm XT-2, XT-20, 16, 18, 56, 16-55, 50-140; zeiss distagon 12, planar 32 film canon 1n hasselblad 501cm, 50, 80
<<all zooms for sale—zeiss, canon & fuji>>

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mcluckie
I play with fire, run with scissors and skate on thin ice all at once!
Avatar
2,065 posts
Gallery: 97 photos
Likes: 315
Joined Jul 2009
Location: Chicago, Hong Kong
     
Dec 27, 2016 10:51 as a reply to  @ bobbyz's post |  #99

But so expensive! My other activities and interests are computers, audio reproduction, travel, fly fishing, and whatever else is too expensive for my checkbook. Gardening may be the best.


multidisciplinary visual guy | traveler on the 8-fold path | seeker of the spark | walker of the dog
all dingus | dslr canon 5D4, 70-200LII zeiss distagon 15, 21, 25, 28, 50ƒ1.4 milvus; vario-sonnar N 24-85; makro planar 50, 100 mirrorless leica Q2 fujifilm XT-2, XT-20, 16, 18, 56, 16-55, 50-140; zeiss distagon 12, planar 32 film canon 1n hasselblad 501cm, 50, 80
<<all zooms for sale—zeiss, canon & fuji>>

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Nathan
So boring
Avatar
7,733 posts
Gallery: 16 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 296
Joined Aug 2007
Location: Boston
     
Dec 28, 2016 08:43 |  #100

Hobbies or work, boredom can be avoided by breaking up tasks throughout the day/week/month and try to introduce variety. If you're bored, do something different. You decide if it's totally unrelated or just a different approach or technique. That's where creativity comes in.


Taking photos with a fancy camera does not make me a photographer.
www.nathantpham.com (external link) | Boston POTN Flickr (external link) |
5D3 x2 | 16-35L II | 35 L | 50L | 85L II | 135L | 580 EX II x2

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
MatthewK
Goldmember
Avatar
4,197 posts
Gallery: 777 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 13468
Joined Apr 2009
Location: Maryland
     
Dec 28, 2016 09:03 |  #101

I concur with airfrogusmc above, in that offloading some of the non-photography tasks of the business can aid in not burning out. In my current business venture into photography, my wife handles almost all of the customer interaction/marketing/​business details side of the house (stuff she likes), and it lets me focus more on producing the product (aka the part I like). It definitely takes a load off of my shoulders, keeps my head clear to focus on photography.

Nathan wrote in post #18225534 (external link)
Hobbies or work, boredom can be avoided by breaking up tasks throughout the day/week/month and try to introduce variety. If you're bored, do something different. You decide if it's totally unrelated or just a different approach or technique. That's where creativity comes in.

For me it's tennis and photography... if I look out my backdoor and it's sunny, those are the two I need to decide between (tennis courts are in backyard, and behind them is wooded areas where I shoot photos). I'll be less-bored with one of them, so that's where I usually lean. If it's raining: video games or sleep :lol:


Canon/Nikon/Fuji

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
chauncey
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
9,696 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 462
Joined Jun 2007
Location: MI/CO
     
Dec 28, 2016 09:26 |  #102

Question for the hobbyists out there...How serious are you about capturing "The Image"?
What are your goals, do you plan the shoot ahead of time, do you work the shot, (time of day/perspectives/whatn​ot)?
Have you mastered your PP skills...how long do you spend working on "That Image"?

Again, how serious are you about photography?


The things you do for yourself die with you, the things you do for others live forever.
A man's worth should be judged, not when he basks in the sun, but how he faces the storm.

My stuff...http://1x.com/member/c​hauncey43 (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
airfrogusmc
I'm a chimper. There I said it...
36,274 posts
Gallery: 147 photos
Best ofs: 6
Likes: 5562
Joined May 2007
Location: Oak Park, Illinois
Post edited over 2 years ago by airfrogusmc. (3 edits in all)
     
Dec 28, 2016 09:53 |  #103

When shooting for myself I don't plan anything. I try to stay completely open to what may happen. A blank slate. I agree with and work like these guys.

"I start with no preconceived idea -" Edward Weston

"My pictures are never pre-visialized or planned. I feel strongly that pictures must come from contact with things ath the time and place of taking. At such times, I rely on intuitive, perceptual responses to guide me, using reason only after the final print is made to accept or rejetct the results of my work." - Wynn Bullock

"The state of mind of a photographer while creating is a blank...For those who would equate "blank" with a kind of static emptiness, I must explain that this is a special kind of blank. It is a very active state of mind really, a very receptive state of mind, ready at an instant to grasp an image, yet with no image pre-formed in it at any time. We should note that the lack of a pre-formed pattern or preconceived idea of how anything ought to look is essential to this blank condition."-Minor White

"My photographs are not planned or composed in advance and I do not anticipate that the onlooker will share my viewpoint. However, I feel that if my photograph leaves an image on his mind--something has been accomplished." - Robert Frank

Chauncey I doubt many here are as serious about photography as I am.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Hogloff
Cream of the Crop
7,606 posts
Likes: 415
Joined Apr 2003
Location: British Columbia
     
Dec 28, 2016 09:53 |  #104
bannedPermanent ban

chauncey wrote in post #18225556 (external link)
Question for the hobbyists out there...How serious are you about capturing "The Image"?
What are your goals, do you plan the shoot ahead of time, do you work the shot, (time of day/perspectives/whatn​ot)?
Have you mastered your PP skills...how long do you spend working on "That Image"?

Again, how serious are you about photography?

I can only speak for myself as I'm retired but still sell prints for some spare change.

I shoot for myself, scout out locations and setup the composition then wait for the right light. If I come back with 1 keeper image from my outing, I'm happy. I can spend days processing and printing the image until I get it just right, at times ending up with a paper that I did not originally start with.

I think serious amateurs spend more time and effort to get that right shot and spend more time and effort processing that image than the pro's as the amateur is his own customer and has his own standards whereas the pro just wants to meet the customers requirements and then onto the next job.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
OhLook
Spiderwoman
Avatar
18,836 posts
Gallery: 74 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 6528
Joined Dec 2012
Location: California: SF Bay Area
     
Dec 28, 2016 10:12 |  #105

chauncey wrote in post #18225556 (external link)
Question for the hobbyists out there...How serious are you about capturing "The Image"?

If "The Image" is supposed to be a goal of mine, this is the first I've heard about it.


PRONOUN ADVISORY: OhLook is a she. | A FEW CORRECT SPELLINGS: lens, aperture, amateur, hobbyist, per se, raccoon, whoa, more so (2 wds.), shoo-in | IMAGE EDITING OK

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

42,258 views & 285 likes for this thread
Getting bored of photography
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is wooricoin
846 guests, 224 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.