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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 27 Feb 2017 (Monday) 09:55
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Hiking with heavy lenses

 
craigat
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Feb 27, 2017 09:55 |  #1

I just bought the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary lens, which at 5.5 pounds is the heaviest lens I've ever had. Most of the time while using it, I'll be attaching the lens to the tripod as expected. My concern however is when hiking from one shooting spot to the next. In theory I could just leave the lens attached and let it hang from the camera body (5D4), but I'd worry about damaging the mount on either the lens or the camera. Does anyone have any suggestions for how I should deal with this? I should mention I use a sling strap, so if I did leave it hanging from the body, the camera would be next to my hip with the lens pointing straight down to the ground.




  
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Orogeny
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Feb 27, 2017 10:05 |  #2

craigat wrote in post #18286619 (external link)
In theory I could just leave the lens attached and let it hang from the camera body (5D4), but I'd worry about damaging the mount on either the lens or the camera. Does anyone have any suggestions for how I should deal with this? I should mention I use a sling strap, so if I did leave it hanging from the body, the camera would be next to my hip with the lens pointing straight down to the ground.

I have that lens and a 7D and that is exactly how I carry it. Before I had the 150-600, I had the 150-500 and carried it the same way. I have had one of those two combos since late 2009 and I have never had any issue with either the lens mount or the camera mount.

I should also mention that I very rarely use a tripod.

Tim


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craigat
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Feb 27, 2017 10:50 |  #3

So from your response, it sounds like its safe just to let it hang.

Incidentally, I asked Canon and Sigma support. Haven't heard back from Sigma yet, but the Canon rep said they personally wouldn't let it hang, but that there's no published spec on weight. That, combined with thinking the foot is there for a reason, are what led me to ask here.

I'd love it if I could just let the lens hang and not care though.




  
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Feb 27, 2017 11:04 |  #4

I also use a sling strap - when i mount a lens with a tripod foot I clip the sling to the lens, not the body.
I normally don't use a tripod - so that option works for me, but perhaps less well for you.

I can't imagine that the camera body lens mount would last indefinitely with a 5lb lens hanging off of it. and likely swinging around as you hike.


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Feb 27, 2017 11:22 |  #5

Old fashioned golf cart


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Feb 27, 2017 11:23 |  #6

Jethr0 wrote in post #18286676 (external link)
I can't imagine that the camera body lens mount would last indefinitely with a 5lb lens hanging off of it. and likely swinging around as you hike.

Perhaps not, but mine has lasted 7 years.

Tim


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Snydremark
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Feb 27, 2017 11:27 |  #7

Attach the strap to the lens foot so that the camera hangs parallel to the ground, at your hip and the weight is mostly borne by the strap. That way, you're not putting any real stress on the lens mount.


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Feb 27, 2017 11:58 |  #8

.

Snydremark wrote in post #18286696 (external link)
Attach the strap to the lens foot so that the camera hangs parallel to the ground, at your hip and the weight is mostly borne by the strap. That way, you're not putting any real stress on the lens mount.

.
Eric is exactly right.

Do not let the lens hang from the body. Rather, let the body hang from the lens. If you were using a tripod, you wouldn't attach the camera to the tripod - you would attach the lens foot to the tripod. So it should be done the same way when attaching a carry strap.

.


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Feb 27, 2017 12:02 |  #9

Not one to tempt fate I use a backpack and when it's necessary the Cotton Carrier. I also wear a tactical photo vest on rare occasions.


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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Feb 27, 2017 12:11 |  #10

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18286729 (external link)
.

.
Do not let the lens hang from the body. Rather, let the body hang from the lens.

.

This is exactly what I was thinking after reading the initial post.

I always carry by the heaviest of the two, whether I'm hiking or just walking around a venue.


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Luckless
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Feb 27, 2017 13:09 |  #11

I tend to carry my Sigma 150-500 attached to a 7D with battery grip either stowed safely away in a backpack, or I'll either attach a monopod to the lens foot and carry the camera balanced on my shoulder, or it is cradled in front of me. I've found that doing so feels to put less strain on back/shoulders than trying to carry it from straps, avoid having it "Flop around", and skips having excess webbing and such to get hung up with.

A hip/sling bag for the whole thing might make its way into my collection if I start hiking in conditions where I want my hands free more often without having to stow the camera in a backpack, so it really depends on how exactly you are hiking/using the camera. Are you hiking, going from point A to B and are merely lugging the lens along to a different location, or are you using the camera along the way? A key distinction in my mind that should be made when deciding how to carry such a piece of gear.


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craigat
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Feb 27, 2017 13:19 as a reply to  @ Luckless's post |  #12

I'd say I'm sort of hiking, looking for shots along the way, with no particular destination in mind (normally). I considered moving the strap to the foot, but the concern is that I normally have more than one lens, so if I attach to the foot, I'm left holding the camera anytime a different lens is attached.




  
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Luckless
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Feb 27, 2017 13:25 as a reply to  @ craigat's post |  #13

Maybe move to a safety quick release setup of some kind? Have straps on the camera and spares on the heavy lens - When you swap to the heavy lens, quick change over to the straps going to the lens rather than the camera?

I like to use opposing buckles on either side. That way when you take the lens/camera off the main strap you can still clip them together for a smaller 'carry handle' strap, and they don't flop around as much when stuffing them into a gear bag.


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craigat
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Feb 27, 2017 15:40 as a reply to  @ Luckless's post |  #14

not a bad idea, I use the peak design strap with the quick releases, so I guess I could put the ends on the camera and the lens and switch as seems appropriate. Incidentally, I just heard back from Sigma, they recommend not leaving the lens hanging and say to use the foot.




  
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DaviSto
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Feb 27, 2017 15:44 |  #15

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18286729 (external link)
.

.
Eric is exactly right.

Do not let the lens hang from the body. Rather, let the body hang from the lens. If you were using a tripod, you wouldn't attach the camera to the tripod - you would attach the lens foot to the tripod. So it should be done the same way when attaching a carry strap.

.

Common sense when you think about it. Hold the heavier part on the strap. Hang the lighter part by the lens mount.


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Hiking with heavy lenses
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