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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 11 Jun 2017 (Sunday) 16:36
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Battery Grips-Do you use one and why/why not?

 
Camofelix
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Jun 11, 2017 16:36 |  #1

I'm curious to see what different members think of using battery grips. Are they a daily essential for those of us shooting long days with long lens, something you add for the ability to shoot comfortably in portraits, or a large waste of cash and precious bag weight/space.

Thanks


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Wilt
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Post edited over 1 year ago by Wilt. (2 edits in all)
     
Jun 11, 2017 16:51 |  #2

No, because...


  1. Unlike film cameras, digital cameras already do fps 1<n<10 already, even without a battery grip
  2. I do not find a need to have supplemental buttons along the bottom edge so that they are available in Portrait orientation
  3. Having owned the Olympus OM-1 and OM-4, with detachable motor winder which I seldom use, I do not find an need to place my pinkie finger
  4. Being able to take 670 shots per battery (CIPA) I know I can manage the replacement of the battery (having learned to deal with changing out medium format film magazines every 15 shots)
  5. I do not want more bulk and weight for my already bulky and heavy camera...if I wanted more I would simply buy a 1Dn body and also get the other features/advantages of the big daddy.


Battery grips change the Center of Gravity position, but it does not move the position from beneath the lens to under the body.

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BigAl007
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Jun 11, 2017 17:33 |  #3

Yes I like them, I find the added weight a bit of a help, and the buttons for portrait orientation are great. Mind you my health condition makes using the top buttons harder. I started with a Praktica Nova, which was built like a East German tank. When I then got a new Pentax ME Super I felt it was a little small, until I then got hold of the Autowinder M II. So pretty much the opposite to Wilt. But really neither of us are right or wrong, since this is almost completely down to personal preference.

A 1 series camera would be OK, but the specification of the latest 1DXII really doesn't suite my favorite subject matter. What I really want is a 60 MP version of the 5DIV, without the maximum ISO reduction that Canon foisted on the 5DS/DSr. But of course with the grip, unless Canon want to integrate it in to a 1 series style body for me.

Alan.


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Luckless
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Jun 11, 2017 19:42 |  #4

Yes.

I find the extra mass is very helpful on panning shots, and makes the balance for telephoto lenses feel better.

The extra bit of space for my pinky on my 7D with the grip also makes it far more comfortable to handle.

The added weight is trivial to carry, I can't say I really notice the difference by the end of the day when I carry the gripped camera with any given lens vs the one without the grip. The spare battery already loaded is a nice bonus, as is the second set of control buttons for the rare time I use them.


If you find your DSLR heavy, your pinky already 'has a place' in your natural grip, and you don't think you'll use the portrait layout or extra battery space often, then I would say you would be hard pressed to justify the expense. Personally I bought one grip, and left the other without for times when I wanted the more compact setup. (It often gets the 40mm and slipped into a daily carry bag.)


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TreeburnerCT
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Jun 11, 2017 20:04 |  #5

I have a battery grip on my 7D2 and on my T6s, and as others have said I find the added weight helps to hold the camera steady with larger lenses attached. It's also nice to have battery access while having a tripod plate on the bottom of the camera, and knowing I pretty much will never run out of battery power with a spare set with me.

-Joe


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Dan ­ Marchant
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Jun 11, 2017 22:52 |  #6

Don't use one. All the same reasons as Wilt.
I spent the day yesterday photographing a Golf tourney and the battery was barely half depleted. I don't want to attach a bulky spare battery container to my camera and carry it around all day - I prefer to just leave the spare in my bag with my other kit.

One other possible reason for not using one is that I never shoot in portrait mode; Not even when shooting portraits. So the extra buttons would never get used.


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RhodyPhotos
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Jun 12, 2017 10:00 |  #7

Yes and no!

When covering road races, i easily shoot about 4000-5000 pics in portrait orientation. This is when I absolutely need the grip to save my wrist. When shooting everything else I prefer not having the grip. It bulks up the camera quite a bit and gives it the intimidating "professional" look making people think I'm a lot better photographer than what I actually am :-)


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Luckless
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Jun 12, 2017 10:05 |  #8

RhodyPhotos wrote in post #18376639 (external link)
It bulks up the camera quite a bit and gives it the intimidating "professional" look making people think I'm a lot better photographer than what I actually am :-)

Being mistaken for a 'professional' was one of the things I wanted to try to avoid when I got into photography, so the first camera I bought was this red T3, which looked rather toy like and couldn't possibly be confused for a professional...

People still assumed I was some highly experienced pro or something while I was sitting there trying to remember some basics of exposure settings and fiddling with the controls on the thing, so I've since given up worry about whether anyone things I'm a pro or not, and just buy gear that helps me get the photos I want out of it. :D People will think what they want to think regardless of what gear is in my hands apparently, so why worry?


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john ­ crossley
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Jun 12, 2017 10:17 |  #9

Camofelix wrote in post #18376138 (external link)
I'm curious to see what different members think of using battery grips. Are they a daily essential for those of us shooting long days with long lens, something you add for the ability to shoot comfortably in portraits, or a large waste of cash and precious bag weight/space.

Thanks

Like everything else in photography there is no right or wrong, do whatever you are comfortable with.


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RhodyPhotos
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Jun 12, 2017 10:20 as a reply to  @ Luckless's post |  #10

Yes, true. It is sometimes a bit uncomfortable trying to shoot with my 6d in a sea of parents with iPhones and samsung whatevers. I guess anything more than what fits in the front pocket of a shirt is a "professional" setup :-) The best is when I add a speedlite to it. Like from which century did I get a camera that does not have a built-in flash :-)


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RDKirk
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Jun 12, 2017 12:22 |  #11

I've been using cameras with "grips" since my Topcon Super DM in the early 70 and then a bite later Canon F-1 with the MF motor drive (with the handle stuffed with ten AA batteries).

I find modern DSLRs will cramp my hand pretty quickly, more so than the old film SLRs, and that's the primary reason I use them.




  
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jra
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Jun 12, 2017 12:54 |  #12

I shoot a lot of portrait orientation on a monopod and having a grip with the extra buttons is far more comfortable for me.




  
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D-Noc
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Jun 12, 2017 12:58 |  #13

RhodyPhotos wrote in post #18376652 (external link)
Yes, true. It is sometimes a bit uncomfortable trying to shoot with my 6d in a sea of parents with iPhones and samsung whatevers. I guess anything more than what fits in the front pocket of a shirt is a "professional" setup :-) The best is when I add a speedlite to it. Like from which century did I get a camera that does not have a built-in flash :-)

Ooh.. I know the feeling :-D

Other than that, I used grips on the previous cameras I owned, but on the 6D I seldom use it. I just don't feel the need anymore. I have been trying to trim down the weight of the gear I carry, and along the way i found out that the camera grip was expendable.
Another funny thing is that while there is so may people praising Micro 4/3 cameras like the Fuji X-T2 / X-Pro 2 for being small and much easier to lug around than a big ol' DSLR, they often add grips to these cameras.


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Lumens
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Jun 12, 2017 17:48 |  #14

I always thought I'd never want one because I do have small hands and can get a good grip without the extra size to hold on to. Then I went mirror-less and learned the battery life isn't as good as a DSLR. Turns out I really don't need the Battery Grip for Battery life, but now that I have been using it I can't let go.

I have found that with the shutter and other switches available for a vertical view I take many more vertical shots. It has improved my images 100%!


FUJI XT1 -> XF 10-24, XF 18-55, XF 55-200, XF 27mm pancake
6D -> Canon 28mm f2.8 IS, Canon 50mm f1.4, Canon 85mm f1.8, Canon 100mm f2.8 Macro IS
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7D -> Canon EF-S 15-85

  
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tdlavigne
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Jun 12, 2017 18:27 |  #15

I have them for both my cameras, but only use them when I plan on shooting the majority of the day in portrait orientation (ie. headshots, beauty, or some ecom stuff). They're ergonomically better for me (still not recovered torn rotator cuff in right arm) but at the expense of more weight. Most days I'll forgo them though and just deal with the rotation of the camera...not really worth the weight/price 99.9% of the time.




  
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Battery Grips-Do you use one and why/why not?
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