Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Macro Talk 
Thread started 09 Sep 2017 (Saturday) 05:43
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

New conical diffuser

 
TeamSpeed
01010100 01010011
Avatar
33,277 posts
Gallery: 72 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 3539
Joined May 2002
Location: Northern Indiana
Post edited 9 months ago by TeamSpeed.
     
Sep 13, 2017 12:45 as a reply to  @ post 18451327 |  #46

Cool, glad I am kinda on the same track!

The idea of the hinge is to control where you send the reflected light. Depending on the subject matter's dimensions and protrusions, you might want to send more fill to the more of the front of the object vs leaving that foreground area darker and sending more of the light back.

Creating a hinged section could be interesting, I assume it would be 3 pieces, the mount plate, the reflector/barndoor plate, and a hinge pin. The hinge pin wouldn't have to be printed though, there are probably much less expensive items that could serve as the hinge pin in bulk.


Past Equipment | My Gallery (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
JasonC007
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
427 posts
Gallery: 55 photos
Likes: 190
Joined Oct 2012
Location: Derbyshire
     
Sep 13, 2017 12:54 as a reply to  @ TeamSpeed's post |  #47

Oh I see what you mean. Well it would be possible to print a hinge that worked without having to use something else for the pin. The problem I can see with the hinge is that it would need some sort of friction so it stayed in place, which is doable but that friction could deteriorate.

I do have another idea on that though, which is coming from another idea I had for adjustable/flexible mounts, and that is to use flexi material but with a bendable metal insert. As long as I could find something that could be bent repeatedly, I think this would be a more robust and easier to use option. I will have a think!

Thanks for all the ideas :)


Canon 80D | 24-105L | 100mm f/2.8L IS Macro | MP-E65 f/2.8 1-5x Macro | Tamron 150-600 | Sigma 10mm Fisheye | EF 24mm f/2.8 Pancake | MT-24EX | 600EX-RT |
Flickr (external link) | Google+ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
TeamSpeed
01010100 01010011
Avatar
33,277 posts
Gallery: 72 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 3539
Joined May 2002
Location: Northern Indiana
     
Sep 13, 2017 13:17 |  #48

Engineering minds never sleep! :D


Past Equipment | My Gallery (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SteB
Member
Avatar
189 posts
Gallery: 10 photos
Likes: 67
Joined Oct 2008
Location: Whitchurch, Shropshire, United Kingdom
Post edited 9 months ago by Lester Wareham with reason 'cleaned up a bit'.
     
Sep 13, 2017 15:22 as a reply to  @ post 18451327 |  #49

Nice design Jason. With my end of lens concave diffusers I attack them with self-adhesive velcro. This is because they do get in the way both on the ground and with taller vegetation. For macro photography I've mainly used them for fill-in under beetles which often have black underneaths and lighter uppers like Ladybirds for example.

The reason I am responding is that I can help you with this type of approach as I have a lot of experience of it. If you are using it for macro you need quite a reflective under part as not as much light is reflected back up as you suspect. What I mean is that you can struggle to see the fill-in. What I've found is that these under reflectors need to be curved to be most effective. Also it is best if they are covered with a reflective material. You might suspect that it would cause reflections, but this reflected up light is much weaker than the top down light direct from the flash. A very useful reflective material I have used is embossed mylar reflective sheet. This is created to avoid hotspots and is used for hydroponic growing. You can find it on eBay etc. Another approach I have found effect is to but small curved reflectors higher up the sides.

As I was trying to explain earlier, the inverse square law is important in macro lighting. Doubling the distance the light travels reduces the light intensity by approximately 2 f-stops, which hugely reduces the intensity of that light. With a macro subject, if you calculate the distance the light travels you will see that light travelling from the flash heads to the reflector plate, and back up to the subject is travelling much further than from the flash head to the subject. Then there is the reduction in light intensity because the light is being reflected from a white surface, and even with a silvered surface there is lot of light loss. Plus only a small amount of often indirect light is being reflected down.

I'm genuinely trying to help here, and in this instance my only mention that I have used this extensively, is to say I've got a lot of experience of what effect it has.

This is one of the reasons I created a concave diffuser for ring lites. I used the bottom tube for fill-in. If you look at the photos of the set-up, you will see a small lower diffuser part. This gives far more fill-in than any lower reflector even on low power.
http://orionmystery.bl​ogspot.co.uk …lite-flashes-or-ring.html (external link)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
JasonC007
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
427 posts
Gallery: 55 photos
Likes: 190
Joined Oct 2012
Location: Derbyshire
     
Sep 14, 2017 05:16 as a reply to  @ SteB's post |  #50

Thanks for the info SteB.

I have considered using a more reflective material, and in fact on my home made version of diffusers, this is what I have used to keep the light to a maximum. However, I am trying as much as possible to avoid having to use any type of 3rd party material and keep everything 3D printed.

It's worth noting that my general idea for diffusion is not to over diffuse images. My aim is to diffuse enough to eliminate hotspots and allow more creative light images such as the one below. This image is a focus stack at 5x magnification and you can clearly see the light sources from either side, which imo looks much better than a fully diffused image. The diffuser I posted at the start of this thread will most likely not work that well with 2 tiny flash heads so it will most likely be turned into a tubular diffuser with LED light strips wrapped around it, I would then make this available to those you do want 100% because imo this it the only way to do it. However! I do need to do a lot of testing so who knows :)


IMAGE: https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4197/35113067816_51e67c57fe_b.jpg

Canon 80D | 24-105L | 100mm f/2.8L IS Macro | MP-E65 f/2.8 1-5x Macro | Tamron 150-600 | Sigma 10mm Fisheye | EF 24mm f/2.8 Pancake | MT-24EX | 600EX-RT |
Flickr (external link) | Google+ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SteB
Member
Avatar
189 posts
Gallery: 10 photos
Likes: 67
Joined Oct 2008
Location: Whitchurch, Shropshire, United Kingdom
     
Sep 14, 2017 06:32 as a reply to  @ JasonC007's post |  #51

I fully understand the wish for more interesting lighting than just the super-diffused look. In fact this was the very reason for creating the inverted dome concave diffusers. The diffuser actually reshapes and concentrates the light because it acts like a lens. But best of all it re-distributes the light so there is no central hotspot. You can test it for yourself. Get some type of plastic dome, it doesn't even need to be a neutral colour for testing. A top off a roll on deodorant can be used. If you put it in a roll of reflective material like aluminium foil you can then with the lights low shine a powerful LED light through it on to a light coloured wall. What you will notice is that with the concave bit facing the wall, is that you get a circular or oval (depending on the shape of the dome) patten on the wall. You will notice it's a bit like a spotlight and only spreads slightly with distance. Also you will see how even the light distribution is, and changing the LED light only has a slight effect. You can use it very much like a spotlight in a film/movie or theatre lighting set. The best thing is that although the light is very concentrated, so you can get creative direct light, there is no bright hotspot in the middle. Therefore you get a very nice directional light that doesn't cause bright specular reflections (bright specular reflections on curved shiny surfaces on insects are basically a reflection of the very bright central spot you get with many diffusers or a bare flash head.

Also if you put the dome in the position where the convex part of the dome is face the wall, you will see an amazing difference. The light is spread right out, but the light distribution is poor with a very bright hotspot in the middle and light drop off as you get to the edges. Yet this is with the same dome. In one orientation it gives a circle of light with even light distribution, and in the other direction it creates a very bright hotspot in the centre with increasing light drop off from the centre. This is why convex domes are generally not a good idea for macro diffusers.

This diffuser design from John Hallmen might be of great interest to you. Firstly it is a design ripe for 3D printing. John made it by cutting it out of a lampshade. However, when I tried to get one in the UK I couldn't find this design anywhere. All the ones in UK stores of this design were either glass or hard plastic, therefore impossible to cut like this. I corresponded with John and it appears to be that the soft plastic design is common in Sweden, but not elsewhere. I guess it is just to do with fashion and lots of light fittings were created in Sweden with this design so they had to keep making them for the Swedish market. It is ripe for 3D printing because if you cut it out of a lampshade you are throwing most of the material away. You could also get it to perfectly fit the MP-E 65mm, or even better get it to fit your magnetic attachment for your modular diffuser.
https://flic.kr/p/pZhx​VP (external link)

I'm sure John would be interested and quite happy for a 3D printed version because when he described it, it was for people to make their own, and he didn't realise that these lampshades wouldn't be easy to get elsewhere.

John made this diffuser for the same reason you want it, for more creative lighting. John has said he isn't a fan of the super-diffused look.

I created the super-diffused look for field macro photography when consistency is important. In other words no matter what angle, type of subject, you need reliable consistent light. So whilst the super-diffused look is a bit boring, you nevertheless do know what you are going to get. That's because when you see a macro subject in the field you often don't have time to photograph it and no time to adjust more creative lighting. Whereas for studio stacking you can experiment with more creative lighting.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
TeamSpeed
01010100 01010011
Avatar
33,277 posts
Gallery: 72 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 3539
Joined May 2002
Location: Northern Indiana
Post edited 9 months ago by TeamSpeed. (4 edits in all)
     
Sep 14, 2017 07:38 |  #52

Okay Jason, something else to consider. It won't be long before we have these light panels being readily available. I could see a design where something mounts to the flash shoe, instead of a flash system, where it is a holder for these panels, where you could shape them in a ring, at angles on a barn door setup, etc so you have continuous lighting instead of flash. This won't work for all macro subjects, but think in the field of product shots for Amazon, etc... :) There is high demand for that kind of commercial need, and could be superior in many cases to setting up a light box with multiple lights on the outside, etc.

https://www.oled-info.com …ls-mass-produce-them-2015 (external link)

I would think that a 360 angled panel just behind the lens with this kind of flexible paneling and a battery source mounted to the flash shoe could be interesting for macro photography. Just a thought into the future? Cool stuff, and one can see how this will progress over the next several years.

Strange how LEDs came out in the 70s, mainstream enough to have LED wristwatches, but then died down for many decades, and now they are finally revolutionizing how we live. Amazing how redesigning them and new manufacturing techniques and battery tech have finally caught up to make them more viable 40+ years later.


Past Equipment | My Gallery (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
JasonC007
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
427 posts
Gallery: 55 photos
Likes: 190
Joined Oct 2012
Location: Derbyshire
     
Sep 14, 2017 07:52 |  #53

SteB wrote in post #18451915 (external link)
I fully understand the wish for more interesting lighting than just the super-diffused look. In fact this was the very reason for creating the inverted dome concave diffusers. The diffuser actually reshapes and concentrates the light because it acts like a lens. But best of all it re-distributes the light so there is no central hotspot. You can test it for yourself. Get some type of plastic dome, it doesn't even need to be a neutral colour for testing. A top off a roll on deodorant can be used. If you put it in a roll of reflective material like aluminium foil you can then with the lights low shine a powerful LED light through it on to a light coloured wall. What you will notice is that with the concave bit facing the wall, is that you get a circular or oval (depending on the shape of the dome) patten on the wall. You will notice it's a bit like a spotlight and only spreads slightly with distance. Also you will see how even the light distribution is, and changing the LED light only has a slight effect. You can use it very much like a spotlight in a film/movie or theatre lighting set. The best thing is that although the light is very concentrated, so you can get creative direct light, there is no bright hotspot in the middle. Therefore you get a very nice directional light that doesn't cause bright specular reflections (bright specular reflections on curved shiny surfaces on insects are basically a reflection of the very bright central spot you get with many diffusers or a bare flash head.

Also if you put the dome in the position where the convex part of the dome is face the wall, you will see an amazing difference. The light is spread right out, but the light distribution is poor with a very bright hotspot in the middle and light drop off as you get to the edges. Yet this is with the same dome. In one orientation it gives a circle of light with even light distribution, and in the other direction it creates a very bright hotspot in the centre with increasing light drop off from the centre. This is why convex domes are generally not a good idea for macro diffusers.

This diffuser design from John Hallmen might be of great interest to you. Firstly it is a design ripe for 3D printing. John made it by cutting it out of a lampshade. However, when I tried to get one in the UK I couldn't find this design anywhere. All the ones in UK stores of this design were either glass or hard plastic, therefore impossible to cut like this. I corresponded with John and it appears to be that the soft plastic design is common in Sweden, but not elsewhere. I guess it is just to do with fashion and lots of light fittings were created in Sweden with this design so they had to keep making them for the Swedish market. It is ripe for 3D printing because if you cut it out of a lampshade you are throwing most of the material away. You could also get it to perfectly fit the MP-E 65mm, or even better get it to fit your magnetic attachment for your modular diffuser.
https://flic.kr/p/pZhx​VP (external link)

I'm sure John would be interested and quite happy for a 3D printed version because when he described it, it was for people to make their own, and he didn't realise that these lampshades wouldn't be easy to get elsewhere.

John made this diffuser for the same reason you want it, for more creative lighting. John has said he isn't a fan of the super-diffused look.

I created the super-diffused look for field macro photography when consistency is important. In other words no matter what angle, type of subject, you need reliable consistent light. So whilst the super-diffused look is a bit boring, you nevertheless do know what you are going to get. That's because when you see a macro subject in the field you often don't have time to photograph it and no time to adjust more creative lighting. Whereas for studio stacking you can experiment with more creative lighting.


I did a quick test as I have some Fongs. I may not have this setup how it should be but I'm not convinced it eliminates hotspots completely. The square diffusers below are the tests on mine and they seem to smooth out the light better, not perfect due to 3d printing limitations but at least the hotspot is virtually gone and the whole face is lit up. Each side is different because I was comparing a new face to an old face, the one on the left is much thinner so is brighter.

That diffuser by John looks interesting, very easily printed in 3D. I would enclose it more though as a lot of the light is just bouncing off the top surface.

IMAGE: https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4378/37222945905_501a5a0c53_b.jpg

IMAGE: https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4367/37050522472_10c980a1e1_b.jpg

IMAGE: https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4421/37050522602_7441aaef7e_b.jpg

IMAGE: https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4442/37050522552_438c17b880_b.jpg

Canon 80D | 24-105L | 100mm f/2.8L IS Macro | MP-E65 f/2.8 1-5x Macro | Tamron 150-600 | Sigma 10mm Fisheye | EF 24mm f/2.8 Pancake | MT-24EX | 600EX-RT |
Flickr (external link) | Google+ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
JasonC007
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
427 posts
Gallery: 55 photos
Likes: 190
Joined Oct 2012
Location: Derbyshire
     
Sep 14, 2017 07:55 |  #54

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18451951 (external link)
Okay Jason, something else to consider. It won't be long before we have these light panels being readily available. I could see a design where something mounts to the flash shoe, instead of a flash system, where it is a holder for these panels, where you could shape them in a ring, at angles on a barn door setup, etc so you have continuous lighting instead of flash. This won't work for all macro subjects, but think in the field of product shots for Amazon, etc... :) There is high demand for that kind of commercial need, and could be superior in many cases to setting up a light box with multiple lights on the outside, etc.

https://www.oled-info.com …ls-mass-produce-them-2015 (external link)

I would think that a 360 angled panel just behind the lens with this kind of flexible paneling and a battery source mounted to the flash shoe could be interesting for macro photography. Just a thought into the future? Cool stuff, and one can see how this will progress over the next several years.

Strange how LEDs came out in the 70s, mainstream enough to have LED wristwatches, but then died down for many decades, and now they are finally revolutionizing how we live. Amazing how redesigning them and new manufacturing techniques and battery tech have finally caught up to make them more viable 40+ years later.

Yes that is exactly what you need! This would eliminate any diffusion problems in one go, you just need someone to manufacture along with the control box etc, otherwise you back to home made stuff again and I'm not very good with electronics!

I do actually use LED panels for some of my focus stacking because continuous lighting is much better to work with than flash, but flash is needed for live subjects to freeze the motion. So you need super flat, bendy LED panels that can flash at high speed!


Canon 80D | 24-105L | 100mm f/2.8L IS Macro | MP-E65 f/2.8 1-5x Macro | Tamron 150-600 | Sigma 10mm Fisheye | EF 24mm f/2.8 Pancake | MT-24EX | 600EX-RT |
Flickr (external link) | Google+ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SteB
Member
Avatar
189 posts
Gallery: 10 photos
Likes: 67
Joined Oct 2008
Location: Whitchurch, Shropshire, United Kingdom
     
Sep 14, 2017 09:23 as a reply to  @ JasonC007's post |  #55

I'd just explained in a PM to @TeamSpeed that I'd never actually tried converting a GF Lightsphere or one of the cheap knock-offs into a concave diffuser, because their concave domes didn't look ideal to me. They looked too shallow, and the plastic too thin and not opaque enough. As I also said, to be perfectly frank I think the GF Lightspheres work as diffusers at normal distances in spite of and not because of their design. That you could probably get a similar effect firing your flash into a tupperware container. In other word the apparently technical design of some of these diffusers is probably more marketing than anything.

I've never tried John's diffusers because as I say I couldn't find any. So I don't know how dense the plastic is etc. From photos it looks quite a bit more dense and opaque than the GF Lightsphere domes.

Also I fully agree that if being designed from scratch then with the lamp shade diffuser some sort of lip or sides would help. A lot of light must bounce off them.

Here is someone else's test of my inverted dome concave diffusers. If you click on the link marked "Concave Flash Diffuser" it brings you to an archived thread of my original testing of the prototypes. There are side by side comparisons shots with other diffusers including the end of lens concave cup diffuser type which give softer lighting.
http://www.davidkennar​dphotography.com …iffusers-comparison.xhtml (external link)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
JasonC007
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
427 posts
Gallery: 55 photos
Likes: 190
Joined Oct 2012
Location: Derbyshire
     
Sep 14, 2017 10:17 |  #56

I only used the gary fong because you said try any dome and I would see the effects, the fong is all I had. It is actually very thick plastic which is why I never ended up using it in the first place, you lose too much light. I imagine with a better/different tunnel to the quick one I made may help.

To be fair I am pretty happy with the graduated diffusion faces that I have made as they do a good job. This is the design I started using not long after I started macro photography a few years back and it has always worked for me, well I think some of my macro shots show that anyway.

I've taken a look at those test shots, but to me they don't look much different to the results I'm getting from my images, unless I'm missing something? I don't deny that the concave diffuser works well but they don't think they are revolutionary. I think the next step is what TeamSpeed mentioned above where LED light panels will be used and no diffusion will be needed. You'll get smooth light without anything in front of it reducing the light, perfect! In fact I'm looking into those more as we speak to see if I can integrate some with my 3d models.


Canon 80D | 24-105L | 100mm f/2.8L IS Macro | MP-E65 f/2.8 1-5x Macro | Tamron 150-600 | Sigma 10mm Fisheye | EF 24mm f/2.8 Pancake | MT-24EX | 600EX-RT |
Flickr (external link) | Google+ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
TeamSpeed
01010100 01010011
Avatar
33,277 posts
Gallery: 72 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 3539
Joined May 2002
Location: Northern Indiana
Post edited 9 months ago by TeamSpeed. (18 edits in all)
     
Sep 14, 2017 10:32 |  #57

Please see my PM, you don't want to use the words "inverted dome" in any of your designs or discussions of your designs. It will cause you grief later. ;) Either stay with concave diffuser or come up with some other unique techno term to distance yourself terminology-wise. Both designs involve flash diffusion (albeit different designs for different purposes), and involving plastic in the design, and the last thing you want to use are terms that were already in use in the mid 2000s and exist even today in the commercial world.

The Fong design is a simplistic diffuser for portraiture, yours is a completely different type of product for more exclusive types of photography with a better, more technically sound design for macro photography, so I would make sure to not use the same descriptive terms. Note the similarity of terms between what you just typed up and what Fong has on his website. It is crucial to not have anyone draw any correlation through terms.

Gary Fong wrote:
The Lightsphere® Universal flash diffuser delivers incredibly flattering, studio-quality light while eliminating the need for bulky flash brackets and umbrellas. If you've used the original Lightsphere® or Lightsphere®-II, you'll find the Lightsphere® Universal™ creates the same great
soft portrait light that you love with the addition of an innovative, patent-pending mount that is guaranteed to stay on! Simple and compact, yet incredibly effective, the Lightsphere® Universal™ is sure to be one of the "must have" flash accessories in your gear bag.

It will transform the way you use your on-camera flash. The Lightsphere® Universal comes with one WhiteDome™ (Inverted Dome), designed to maximize the efficiency and spread of light from your Lightsphere® Universal™, but can also be used for custom white balance. The Lightsphere® Universal™ accepts existing Lightsphere® accessory domes, including the AmberDome™ and the ChromeDome™- for even greater functionality. The Lightsphere® Universal™ is available in two models - Cloud™ and Half-Cloud™. Both deliver incredibly flattering light.

SteB wrote in post #18452043 (external link)
Here is someone else's test of my inverted dome concave diffusers. If you click on the link marked "Concave Flash Diffuser" it brings you to an archived thread of my original testing of the prototypes. There are side by side comparisons shots with other diffusers including the end of lens concave cup diffuser type which give softer lighting.

Good advice for Jason too, it is prudent to make sure you don't use terms that mirror products on the market now. It will save you some headaches later if you decide to move forward with these inventions/designs. Just my experience having engineered a few unique concepts/products over the past 2 decades, and I would own alot more camera gear and be on quite a few more vacations had I heeded these tidbits of wisdom back then. :)

I hope you don't take this as an insult and don't want to start another round of heated debate, I truly want you to know the pitfalls in this area, and I hope you don't make the same mistakes I have in the past, and make you more successful where I have failed.


Past Equipment | My Gallery (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SteB
Member
Avatar
189 posts
Gallery: 10 photos
Likes: 67
Joined Oct 2008
Location: Whitchurch, Shropshire, United Kingdom
     
Sep 14, 2017 11:36 as a reply to  @ JasonC007's post |  #58

If you test my concave diffusers on an MT24EX or other twin flash you will find that uncovered you will find that they're about as efficient as the bare flash heads. What I means by this is if you set the flash on manual, and set a given power ratio, say 1:32, the exposure will be about the same. All other diffusers loose at least several stops of light. The reason for this is that the light is being focused and concentrated into a smaller area. With softbox diffusers that block the bright central part where the light hits the diffuser face, the light loss is even greater. What this meant was that with my Canon 40D I can put the camera in continuous drive of if I remember rightly 6.5fps, is that you could fire a burst and the flash could keep up with the continuous drive for about 7 frames.

There is an actual slight difference in light quality itself even though it is subtle and not easy to see. Any softbox diffusers light i.e. scatters it. But the plastic dome focuses it like a lens. This means the light rays are more parallel than diffused. Strictly speaking is that the concave diffuser is more like light reshaper with some diffusion properties.

The whole set-up was designed to be used in a modular way initially. First would be the bare concave diffuser. Then you could push a white foam plug into the end of the diffuser - this would give an extra step up in diffusion, and then the light tent for even more diffusion. All could be quickly swapped in the field and the idea was that you could switch to super diffusion for shiny beetles and to more direct light from the bare concave diffusers for feeding hoverflies etc, where maximum diffusion was not so necessary or even desirable, but fast recycling was more desirable.

In fact it's become even more modular because my light tent now takes up to 3 thicknesses, and I have extra reflectors like I mentioned to fill in from underneath. I use a plastic former for the sheets of diffuser gel and they are attached with small tabs of self-adhesive velcro. This allows me to transport the diffuser gel stored flat in a camera bag. The problem with the whole light tent bit being preformed is that not only can you not adjust the amount of layers, but they are very fragile and easily squashed.

This isn't just theoretical. Sometimes I've tried to photograph a shiny beetle and still found reflections on it, so you want to photograph it again rapidly when it's still there with another level of diffusion. But then suddenly you will find an active insect where you need fast recycling, and you don't want the light tent but getting in the way.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
TeamSpeed
01010100 01010011
Avatar
33,277 posts
Gallery: 72 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 3539
Joined May 2002
Location: Northern Indiana
Post edited 9 months ago by TeamSpeed. (4 edits in all)
     
Sep 14, 2017 11:36 as a reply to  @ JasonC007's post |  #59

You can make your own led light-strip macro flexible sheet lighting. I would love to have some time to make these types of things for my personal use.

http://lifehacker.com …ur-photography-1762020520 (external link)

This at least describes the correct CRI LEDs to use, and building the vinyl/metal edged panel could be pretty easy. Instead of a large rectangular panel, a narrower but longer panel could be made. :)

If nothing else, what this guy does to make his own is very interesting and sounds like fun to try. Like Stephen points out though, perhaps getting a light panel to project the same amount of light as a flash would introduce a much larger footprint, causing issues in getting that shot off without disturbing the subject matter or environment they are in due to the LED light strip. However LEDs are much better and brighter now, so it is conceivable that a curved 360 LED angled panel that was only 20cm wide could be engineered and would put enough light onto the subject without dual flashes and specialized diffusion. If it was created so that there were 8 panels that made up the entire 360 octagonal light, and you could turn on all 6 or 2 opposing panels, etc for different effects, that would be a very useful tool, I would think. I call it the Brighter Bug Beamer. :D


Past Equipment | My Gallery (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SteB
Member
Avatar
189 posts
Gallery: 10 photos
Likes: 67
Joined Oct 2008
Location: Whitchurch, Shropshire, United Kingdom
     
Sep 14, 2017 11:47 as a reply to  @ TeamSpeed's post |  #60

As I explained in my PM inverted dome is not an integral part of the description. It's just to make it clear that I am talking about the end of flash diffuser with the plastic domes rather than the light tent type which fits on the end of the lens. In addition there is no real problem because the inverted bit with Fong Lightspheres is not a technical description of how it works, it's just a fancy term that tells you can put it in upside down - not that it makes any real difference to how the Lightsphere works. They just want some fancy marketing speak to give the false impression that you can magically make big changes to your lighting by slightly altering the end of the over-priced plastic widget on the end of the flash. As I said in the PM, the layout of the room, who is standing where etc, probably has much more effect on the light quality than changing the configuration of the widget. There's only so much you can do with light being emitted from a small reflector size. You can re-direct it, focus it, diffuse it, scatter it, alter it's colour temperature, but that's about it. You can't programme it to give it the effect of a multiple light set up, although the marketers of these devices would like people to think so.

That's also why I've never got too bogged down in particular diffusion types. You can use different types of light modifiers to create roughly the same effect.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

19,029 views & 13 likes for this thread
New conical diffuser
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Macro Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is norm281049
821 guests, 410 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.