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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 14 Sep 2017 (Thursday) 14:15
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4000 vs 8000 shutter speed

 
Scottboarding
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Sep 20, 2017 22:06 |  #106

Two Hot Shoes wrote in post #18456760 (external link)
My feelings are it's only one stop & I know some will go on about how they need [LIke] bokeh or DoF or something, that's fine and if you only want that, well f/1.2 or 0.95 on a full frame is where you'll probably end, needing 1/8000.

These days I think most new cameras have a good electronic shutter, I know my Fuji goes up to 1/32,000.
So for a lot of situations the 1/8000 mechanical shutter is a moot point as you can just move into the E shutter. And yes I know the rolling shutter effect on moving subjects.
Here's one at ISO200 [native base on the Fuji] shot at 1/20,000 at F/1.2. Could have shot this as 3.2 I guess if I only had 1/4000, wouldn't have made much difference but it's just an example

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It's extra helpful when it comes to smaller sensored cameras. I shoot with an M43 camera so my depth of field is always doubled from the aperture. If I want to shoot a photo with the depth of field of a f2 lens, I need to be shooting at f1. F2 is perfectly doable at 1/8000 from my experience, but shooting at f1 demands a much higher shutter speed. My E-M1 has a max (electronic) shutter speed of 1/16000 and there's been times where even that wasn't dark enough.


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GESWhoPhoto
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Sep 22, 2017 08:22 |  #107

This is something I wish my D750 had. I had an agonizing time deciding between the D810 and D750, and decided to go with the D750's convenience features (WiFi transfers, tilting screen, etc.) over the D810's faster shutter speed, better ISO performance, slightly higher dynamic range, etc. Pretty sure I've resolved to just hunt for a great deal on a D810 and dual-wield in situations where I think it will matter.


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CyberDyneSystems
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Post edited 8 months ago by CyberDyneSystems. (2 edits in all)
     
Sep 25, 2017 09:30 |  #108

If your body does not allow ISO 50, is it just as "crippled?"

If it does, isn't 1/4000 suddenly exactly the same thing?


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Scatterbrained
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Sep 25, 2017 13:23 |  #109

CyberDyneSystems wrote in post #18459977 (external link)
If your body does not allow ISO 50, is it just as "crippled?"

If it does, isn't 1/4000 suddenly exactly the same thing?

IIRC, iso 50 is just iso 100 that is pulled down a stop in camera.


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John ­ Sheehy
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Sep 26, 2017 07:00 |  #110

Scatterbrained wrote in post #18460208 (external link)
IIRC, iso 50 is just iso 100 that is pulled down a stop in camera.

Most of the time, but not always. The early 1D-series cameras had some extra headroom in the sensor that ISO 100 didn't have, but not a full stop.




  
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Sep 26, 2017 07:10 as a reply to  @ John Sheehy's post |  #111

The early 1D also had a shutter speed of 1/16000 of a second


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John ­ Sheehy
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Sep 26, 2017 09:33 |  #112

Two Hot Shoes wrote in post #18460666 (external link)
The early 1D also had a shutter speed of 1/16000 of a second

Yes, and very importantly, full normal flash sync at 1/500.

The difference between a jumping animal at 1/500 and 1/250 or 1/200 is tremendous.




  
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CyberDyneSystems
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Post edited 8 months ago by CyberDyneSystems.
     
Sep 26, 2017 09:42 |  #113

Scatterbrained wrote in post #18460208 (external link)
IIRC, iso 50 is just iso 100 that is pulled down a stop in camera.


In respect to the arguments being posted here supporting the need for 1/8000 shutter speed, I am unclear how a camera arrives at an ISO 50 setting matters.

For those that want to shoot wide open with an f/1.2 lens in broad daylight, being able to set 1/8000 @ ISO 100 vs. 1/4000 @ ISO 50 would have identical results. That's ll I am saying. Lots of ISO setting are fake, yet we use them all the time and they give us the result we desire, ie: the ability to use ISO to balance shutter speed and aperture.

ie: I notice for example that the 6D Mark II has an ISO 50 setting, just like its big brothers the 5D4 and 1Dx MarkII


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gjl711
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Sep 26, 2017 09:50 |  #114

John Sheehy wrote in post #18460736 (external link)
Yes, and very importantly, full normal flash sync at 1/500.

The difference between a jumping animal at 1/500 and 1/250 or 1/200 is tremendous.

The difference between 1/4000 and 1/8000 is trivial and controllable with software by the camera manufacturer. The ability to deliver 1/500 sync speed is something else entirely and may require a redesign of the shutter assemble.


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CyberDyneSystems
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Sep 26, 2017 11:46 |  #115

Indeed, at this time no mechanical shutter in a mainstream or pro DSLR is giving us 1/500 sync.


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kmilo
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Sep 26, 2017 12:23 |  #116

I think it's more "needed" for those of us with crop sensors. Achieving separation from the background isn't easy sometimes ... which, under certain special circumstances (like the sun reflecting off tons of white water), drives up the shutter speed. I fully admit that it took me a long time to find such a situation in my own photo library.

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John ­ Sheehy
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Sep 26, 2017 12:54 |  #117

CyberDyneSystems wrote in post #18460738 (external link)
In respect to the arguments being posted here supporting the need for 1/8000 shutter speed, I am unclear how a camera arrives at an ISO 50 setting matters.

For those that want to shoot wide open with an f/1.2 lens in broad daylight, being able to set 1/8000 @ ISO 100 vs. 1/4000 @ ISO 50 would have identical results.

For a high-contrast OOC JPEG, perhaps, but for the RAW files, the latter is going to get more highlights clipped. Most recent cameras with ISO 50 can not record any exposures higher than they can at ISO 100.




  
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Bassat
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Sep 26, 2017 15:32 |  #118

CyberDyneSystems wrote in post #18460738 (external link)
In respect to the arguments being posted here supporting the need for 1/8000 shutter speed, I am unclear how a camera arrives at an ISO 50 setting matters.

For those that want to shoot wide open with an f/1.2 lens in broad daylight, being able to set 1/8000 @ ISO 100 vs. 1/4000 @ ISO 50 would have identical results. That's ll I am saying. Lots of ISO setting are fake, yet we use them all the time and they give us the result we desire, ie: the ability to use ISO to balance shutter speed and aperture.

ie: I notice for example that the 6D Mark II has an ISO 50 setting, just like its big brothers the 5D4 and 1Dx MarkII

The original 6D has ISO 50. I don't care if it is a kludge or not; it works, and it allows me to shoot f/2 in broad daylight.


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MalVeauX
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Post edited 8 months ago by MalVeauX. (2 edits in all)
     
Sep 26, 2017 15:36 |  #119

kmilo wrote in post #18460822 (external link)
I think it's more "needed" for those of us with crop sensors.

Not sure what you're getting at. Maybe you can explain?

Maybe you felt the need to be at F2 because of depth of field? Looks to me like you were standing fairly far away from the kids and cropped this. But maybe I'm wrong!

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kmilo
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Sep 26, 2017 16:08 |  #120

MalVeauX wrote in post #18460943 (external link)
Not sure what you're getting at. Maybe you can explain?

Maybe you felt the need to be at F2 because of depth of field? Looks to me like you were standing fairly far away from the kids and cropped this. But maybe I'm wrong!

Very best,

I simply mean a full frame sensor is better at creating separation between the subject and the background.


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4000 vs 8000 shutter speed
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