Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 17 Oct 2017 (Tuesday) 09:25
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

How would U choose a camera 4 your wife? (hsbnd)

 
OhLook
Spiderwoman
Avatar
16,958 posts
Gallery: 70 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 4029
Joined Dec 2012
Location: California: SF Bay Area
     
Oct 17, 2017 19:50 |  #16

mikeinctown wrote in post #18474887 (external link)
who the heck comes up with the nonsense of a DSLR is too much to learn at once?

That was I, as you must have noticed, given that your post followed right after mine. A little more tact would have been appropriate. Maybe even a little more readiness to empathize with people at different stages of practice from your own.

The OP said his wife doesn't like complexity and isn't the techno sort. (Me too. I like complexity in some areas but not in learning curves for operating unfamiliar devices.) She's old enough not to have grown up in a gadget-filled world. (Me too.) If she's rarely or never used a camera, a compact or prosumer model would offer her a gentler start than one that requires choosing lenses to fit the shooting situation, properly carrying and storing an arsenal of removable parts, cleaning a sensor, studying recommendations written by people who don't define for beginners the terms they use.

I started with a pocket-size camera, 8 mp, because that's what they showed me at the store. When I outgrew it, I got a G15. I won't go further until the next step up on the "fancy features" scale becomes much smaller and lighter. Guys with big muscles may not give portability such a high priority.

As Mrs. OP learns more about photography, she'll have a better idea of what kind of equipment suits her needs.


PRONOUN ADVISORY: OhLook is a she. | A FEW CORRECT SPELLINGS: lens, aperture, amateur, hobbyist, per se, raccoon, whoa, more so (2 wds.), shoo-in | IMAGE EDITING OK

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
TreeburnerCT
Senior Member
Avatar
416 posts
Gallery: 102 photos
Likes: 406
Joined Dec 2016
Location: Stratford, CT, USA
     
Oct 17, 2017 21:33 |  #17

I would look into some of Canon's point and shoot models, we have an SX530 HS at work with CDHK added for RAW functionality and that little camera can take great photos! It's what encouraged me to move up to a DSLR, but for someone looking for a small camera it's 24-1200mm 35mm equivalent focal length and the RAW files generated using CDHK are versatile up to ISO 1600 and sometimes even 3200! Remember you'll always get better photos from the small point and shoot you took with you for its portability than the big, heavy, expensive DSLR you left home because of its lack of portability.

-Joe


RapidPhotoCT.com (external link) | RapidPhotoCT Facebook (external link) | RapidPhotoCT Instagram (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
teekay
Goldmember
Avatar
2,904 posts
Likes: 513
Joined Apr 2001
Location: British Columbia, Canada
     
Oct 17, 2017 22:35 |  #18

Bassat wrote in post #18474929 (external link)
I tried processing some raws from the G15. Not worth the trouble.

Sorry, have to disagree. I use a G15 as my carry-around camera always with me in the car, always shoot RAW, and always find it worthwhile to convert and process the RAW files in LR.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ejenner
Goldmember
Avatar
3,629 posts
Gallery: 66 photos
Likes: 492
Joined Nov 2011
Location: Denver, CO
     
Oct 17, 2017 22:43 |  #19

I agree with shooting raw. Much better pics once I converted my wife to an S100 in P mode. Then I just go though an process them and transfer them to her laptop. Usually she in not shooting in the best light, so NR, highlight recovery and/or shadow recovery make the raw output so much better than the internal .jpeg engine.


Edward Jenner
5DIII, 7DII, M6, GX1 II,M11-22, Sig15mm FE,16-35 F4,TS-E 17,Sig 18-250 OS Macro,M18-150,24-105,T45 1.8VC,70-200 f4 IS,70-200 2.8 vII,Sig 85 1.4,100L,135L,400DOII.
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/48305795@N03/ (external link)
https://www.facebook.c​om/edward.jenner.372/p​hotos (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Owain ­ Shaw
Some of my best friends are people.
Avatar
2,012 posts
Gallery: 28 photos
Likes: 573
Joined Aug 2006
Location: Valencia, Spain.
     
Oct 18, 2017 03:00 |  #20

I think a few people have said that the important thing about a camera for your wife, husband or A.N. Other Person is that it is a camera they like and will want to use. If you get the wrong one for that person, it will go unused and it won't matter what its capabilities as a camera are. I liked OhLook's second post on the subject, far more succinct than what I'm about to say ...

We're all here on a photography forum and can think of nothing better than using, maintaining and charging our cameras; putting the card in the card reader, downloading the shots and processing the RAW files. There's a whole lot of people who don't have these inclinations.

SLRs are complicated things. Yes they have an automatic mode but they also have lenses, possibly multiple ones, that you need to know how to take off, put on and store - as well as which one to use. Among other complications which may seem trivial and basic to some but that's because we are interested parties who have taken the time to learn all about it. For people who aren't as interested, yet, those could be obstacles to them becoming interested.

In contrast, a well-equipped point and shoot is probably a good fit. Many of them can produce RAW files for when the person gets more interested in that aspect ... or just produce JPEGs if they decide not to. Many of them have the possibility of manual or semi-manual control should that become important to our new photographer. They generally have more zooming capacity available in a smaller, lighter and more complex way. For someone new to photography, again, the appeal of carrying around a lot of equipment and weight may not (yet) fill their heart with glee. They might find it daunting and a barrier to going out and shooting. A camera you can slip in a pocket or something is more likely to leave the house with them. It's important to keep in mind the person we are buying for, that person is a different person to each of us with different needs and desires.

Another thing that I think is important is encouraging, but not pressuring, them to shoot. Teach them how to use it, and not just at the beginning but offer advice or to show them what you're doing when you're shooting, and if you notice anything when looking at their images. Make them an active part of your photography excursions, trips or whatever. Ask if they're going to bring the camera that day ... and if not, then no worries. That said, it is important that they shoot what they see independently and develop their own vision. That's the point of them having a camera. I think it's also important to go through their images with them present - not take control of that but do it together if you're a wife/husband team, otherwise Photography remains something that is yours, and it's also unlikely they'll take an interest in it in future ... just because they don't now, doesn't meant they can't be interested in the digital processing side of things. There was probably a time when most of us weren't.


| Photographic for the People - New website coming soon. |
| Gear | Flickr (external link) |

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mikeinctown
Goldmember
2,030 posts
Likes: 211
Joined May 2012
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Post edited 10 months ago by mikeinctown.
     
Oct 18, 2017 07:18 |  #21

OhLook wrote in post #18475025 (external link)
That was I, as you must have noticed, given that your post followed right after mine. A little more tact would have been appropriate. Maybe even a little more readiness to empathize with people at different stages of practice from your own.

The OP said his wife doesn't like complexity and isn't the techno sort. (Me too. I like complexity in some areas but not in learning curves for operating unfamiliar devices.) She's old enough not to have grown up in a gadget-filled world. (Me too.) If she's rarely or never used a camera, a compact or prosumer model would offer her a gentler start than one that requires choosing lenses to fit the shooting situation, properly carrying and storing an arsenal of removable parts, cleaning a sensor, studying recommendations written by people who don't define for beginners the terms they use.

I started with a pocket-size camera, 8 mp, because that's what they showed me at the store. When I outgrew it, I got a G15. I won't go further until the next step up on the "fancy features" scale becomes much smaller and lighter. Guys with big muscles may not give portability such a high priority.

As Mrs. OP learns more about photography, she'll have a better idea of what kind of equipment suits her needs.

Different stages of practice mean nothing when there is an auto function and it can shoot in JPEG, eliminating the entire RAW to JPEG conversion and whatnot. I've been shooting for whatever time it has been since I joined the forum. My first camera was a DSLR, a T3i. I used it in auto for a week, then went to one of the somewhat manual modes, then a month later to full auto. To imply that a DSLR is too much to learn when you have a mode that requires the same amount of learning as a point and shoot is beyond absurd.

Now if you wanted to phrase it as a DSLR may be a lot heavier or bulkier than she may want then I would be all on board with that, but you didn't.

BTW, to this day I still have never cleaned a sensor, and the kit lens was all I had for the first year or two, which eliminated that pesky concern about choosing the proper lens for the subject. You have the same limitations with a point and shoot. zero differences.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wallstreetoneil
Goldmember
Avatar
2,085 posts
Gallery: 14 photos
Likes: 1199
Joined Nov 2014
Location: Toronto Canada
     
Oct 18, 2017 08:33 |  #22

I have taught, many a person, the basics of how to shoot in fully manual mode in 20 minutes that have never used a DSLR camera before - and they can do it - it doesn't mean they are fast, it doesn't mean they don't have to think, and it doesn't mean they will fully remember it the next day - however, it is all very doable (see picture below of me teaching my 6 year old in 30 minutes last summer how to fully use a 1DXii in manual with bounce flash).

This is what I do

- F2.8, F4, F8 (1 person, 2 persons, everything in focus)
- 1/100, 1/200, 1/1000 (people posing, people moving, sports)
- single point focus, use joystick to put focus point on what you what to be in the most focus

However, given what the original post was about, a person married to another person, who owns two cameras themselves, and sounds like potentially on walks or other, may want to start trying to learn as well while out on these adventures together. Candidate doesn't use cellphone to take pictures etc.

My original IPhone 8 or Samsung Note 8 is a real suggestion - learn to take pictures, find out about filters (easy processing) and post a few to FB to her close friends or family while following her partner around - sounds like a good idea to me.

My second choice is buy a very modern, lighter, less bulky mirrorless camera, that produces excellent jpegs sooc, such as a Fuji X-T2 or other - (Sony 6500?), with their fast standard zoom 18-55 F2.8-F4 (or similar). The advantage here is that this can also make a nice travel camera for both people. Make the experience about producing good jpegs sooc, but it can do raw if desired.

My 3rd choice is the $300 used Rebel and kit lens just to start learning and then resell it in 12 months if this is really something of interest.

For me personally, I have found that having participated in many different activities in my life, that the buy cheaper used to start and or buy the prosumer equivalent immediately, has always worked out better because it is either a fling that will pass (generally never happens for me) or I want to do it and want the proper tool for the trade - i.e in this case, for the candidate mentioned, the $1200-$2000 modern Fuji or equivalent that can be used happily for years to come.

The one issue I have with older / cheaper introductory consumer type cameras is that the control dials are general NOT easy to use - in contrast, put a 5D4 in a beginners hands, and it is just so much easier to teach and use - this is the feedback I have gotten over, and over again, when I teach people - if the dial layout is good, they can and do come up to speed so much easier (and it is enjoyable), with a well laid out camera (easy to find and operate, Shutter (finger) , Aperture (thumb), ISO (thumb and finger) and Focus point selection (thumb) - all while their eye is looking in the optical viewer.

IMAGE: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8110/28839411160_78b54a1110_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/KWrw​bU  (external link) learning the 1DX_ii and bounce flash (external link) by Paul O'Neil (external link), on Flickr

Hockey and wedding photographer. Favourite camera / lens combos: a 1DX II with a Tamron 45 1.8 VC, an A7Rii with a Canon 24-70F2.8L II, and a 5DSR with a Tamron 85 1.8 VC. Every lens I own I strongly recommend [Canon (35Lii, 100L Macro, 24-70F2.8ii, 70-200F2.8ii, 100-400Lii), Tamron (45 1.8, 85 1.8), Sigma 24-105]. If there are better lenses out there let me know because I haven't found them.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
kmilo
Senior Member
Avatar
265 posts
Likes: 275
Joined Nov 2009
Location: Albany, NY
Post edited 10 months ago by kmilo.
     
Oct 18, 2017 08:58 |  #23

Personal opinion alert:

All the joy of photography is lost when using a cell phone. It's simply not the same thing. I actually feel the same way regarding point n shoots, but a stronger argument can be made for that.

DSLR's are pretty cheap (Canon Refurb) and they all have auto mode. And as others have said, you can do the image editing for her.


Kris
Insulting critiques always welcomed. flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
gjl711
According to the lazy TF, My flatulence rates
Avatar
54,338 posts
Likes: 1745
Joined Aug 2006
Location: Deep in the heart of Texas
     
Oct 18, 2017 09:23 |  #24

kmilo wrote in post #18475286 (external link)
Personal opinion alert:

All the joy of photography is lost when using a cell phone. It's simply not the same thing. I actually feel the same way regarding point n shoots, but a stronger argument can be made for that.
....

That kind of depends on what your goal is. A camera is a tool. Some people fall in love with the tool, some with the process, others with the result. Think of it like carpentry, another activity that requires some level of skill. Some are enamored with the tools they use and can talk endlessly about why one hammer is better than another while others are interested in the build process and others about the final product.


Not sure why, but call me JJ.
I used to hate math but then I realised decimals have a point.
.
::Flickr:: (external link)
::Gear::

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
OhLook
Spiderwoman
Avatar
16,958 posts
Gallery: 70 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 4029
Joined Dec 2012
Location: California: SF Bay Area
     
Oct 18, 2017 10:43 |  #25

Owain Shaw wrote in post #18475179 (external link)
I liked OhLook's second post on the subject, far more succinct than what I'm about to say ...

We're all here on a photography forum and can think of nothing better than using, maintaining and charging our cameras; putting the card in the card reader, downloading the shots and processing the RAW files.

Thank you, and I hope you're exaggerating about what we can all think of nothing better than. Far from being an equipment freak, I do the mechanical tasks as means to an end.

mikeinctown wrote in post #18475244 (external link)
Different stages of practice mean nothing when there is an auto function and it can shoot in JPEG. . . . To imply that a DSLR is too much to learn when you have a mode that requires the same amount of learning as a point and shoot is beyond absurd.

Now if you wanted to phrase it as a DSLR may be a lot heavier or bulkier than she may want then I would be all on board with that, but you didn't.

I did make the point about weight and bulk. If you missed it, it's still there for your inspection. I haven't edited the post. Here's a related point: A smaller camera is easier to conceal. This may be a concern for women (and men) going out alone in urban areas.

If a user is going to shoot in Auto or P, what's the point of having a DSLR? You get a more unwieldy and more expensive camera in order to gain control over the way it records a scene. Why give that up by not using its flexibility?

You've called my opinions "nonsense" and then "beyond absurd." I'll have to speak more plainly: Don't do that. It's rude. Other posters in this thread illustrate civil ways of disagreeing.

wallstreetoneil wrote in post #18475270 (external link)
The one issue I have with older / cheaper introductory consumer type cameras is that the control dials are general NOT easy to use

I wholeheartedly agree. With my old compact, I had to interrupt shooting and go to a menu to change too many things. The G15 has the most-used settings on the outside.


PRONOUN ADVISORY: OhLook is a she. | A FEW CORRECT SPELLINGS: lens, aperture, amateur, hobbyist, per se, raccoon, whoa, more so (2 wds.), shoo-in | IMAGE EDITING OK

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Phoenixkh
a mere speck
6,731 posts
Gallery: 63 photos
Likes: 1313
Joined May 2011
Location: Gainesville, Florida
     
Oct 18, 2017 11:26 |  #26

I started taking my wife with me on my birding outings. She loved the nature part of it. One spring, we went to the bird rookery in St Augustine. She was using my little G12. She had fun but was disappointed she wasn't able to caught much of the action.

Our anniversary is in June. That same year, I got her a little SL1, a used 15-85 and a 55-250STM. She immediately fell in love with it.

She doesn't like the technical part of a DSLR, so I often set the camera up with her when we're out birding. That said, she's retained enough of my instructions to take very good photographs of the various kitchens where her kitchen cabinets are installed.

So, my comment: if the person in question had bumped up against the limitations of their cell phone camera, it's isn't that much of a jump to a simple DSLR. As has been mentioned, with a few minutes instruction, they can get started. What my wife has that I lack is vision. She "sees" things differently that I do.... much better for getting photographs that have lasting meaning. I'm learning from her, though I don't have her innate talents. She's learning the technical stuff from me. We are both improving, though, if I give it much thought, I'd rather struggle with the technical side than the artistic. ;)


Kim (the male variety) Canon 1DX2 | 1D IV | 16-35 f/4 IS | 24-105 f/4 IS | 100L IS macro | 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II | 100-400Lii | 50 f/1.8 STM | Canon 1.4X III
RRS tripod and monopod | 580EXII | Cinch 1 & Loop 3 Special Edition | Editing Encouraged

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mdvaden
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
2,250 posts
Gallery: 21 photos
Likes: 554
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Beaverton, Oregon
     
Oct 18, 2017 17:44 as a reply to  @ post 18474990 |  #27

After showing my wife some tinkering in Lightroom on JPGS from my old point and shoot years ago, plus RAW from current DSLR, she favored a camera with RAW

After showing her my DSLRs plus others at retail display, she said something like a Canon SX730 IS is too small to hold. And she wanted to ditch switching lenses. So that ruled-out something like T6i, T5i, etc., etc..

She migrated to the Canon SX60 HS and liked the size and how it felt to hold. So that's what she bought.

Thanks for the feedback.


vadenphotography.com (external link) . . . and . . . Coast Redwoods Main Page (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Owain ­ Shaw
Some of my best friends are people.
Avatar
2,012 posts
Gallery: 28 photos
Likes: 573
Joined Aug 2006
Location: Valencia, Spain.
     
Oct 19, 2017 03:09 |  #28

OhLook wrote in post #18475349 (external link)
Thank you, and I hope you're exaggerating about what we can all think of nothing better than. Far from being an equipment freak, I do the mechanical tasks as means to an end.

I was indeed exaggerating for effect. And likewise, I enjoy using my camera to take pictures ... I don't have any great enthusiasm for the rest of the tasks on the list, as I imagine would be the default position of most people new to photography.


| Photographic for the People - New website coming soon. |
| Gear | Flickr (external link) |

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
kf095
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,301 posts
Gallery: 7 photos
Likes: 224
Joined Dec 2009
Location: Canada, Ontario, Milton
Post edited 10 months ago by kf095.
     
Oct 19, 2017 08:57 |  #29

Get her new iPhone. This will works most likely. I like iPhone photography for FB, it is ideal tool for it.
Worst thing you could do is to get her camera without asking her. Lets be honest, all you want is third camera. ;-)a

Oops, too late. :-P


Old Site (external link). M-E and ME blog (external link). Film Flickr (external link). my DigitaL and AnaLog Gear.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
iAMB
Senior Member
Avatar
840 posts
Likes: 24
Joined Mar 2009
Location: St. Louis
     
Oct 19, 2017 09:50 |  #30

I pretty much just went through this process. My wife asked if I could start showing her how to use the camera, of course I got excited. I also wanted to start paring down my equipment. Best bet is to realize what you both want if you are sharing the same camera.

I wanted to retain Full Frame. Speed was not a huge concern..1DmkIII was a bit overkill without shooting sports. Better Dynamic Range over 5D.

My wife wanted video capability. A lighter lens than the 24-70. She liked the size of the Rebel Line.

And the 6D with 24-105 was the easy winner. It hit all the marks on the list. I am still getting use to the smaller size, but I may get the grip for myself. I still need to truly spend time with it, but first impressions are positive.


Canon 6D Mk I
24-70mm F/4L , 70-200mm F/4L , 50mm 1.8 I , Rokinon 14mm F/2.8 & 35mm F/1.4
"I'm so far behind, it looks like I'm winning"
-Adam

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

8,642 views & 15 likes for this thread
How would U choose a camera 4 your wife? (hsbnd)
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is My Travel Tripod
667 guests, 281 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.