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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 04 Dec 2017 (Monday) 13:27
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Canon 6D not producing sharp pictures!

 
Oksana ­ Gereaue
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Dec 04, 2017 13:27 |  #1

Soembody please help! I switched from rebelt5 to a Canon 6d (fullframe) in hopes of getting sharper, crisper pictures. I've seen amazing photos of other people's 6d results, however mine is not producing those results. What is the problem? Is it the settings? Why am I not achieving sharp photos? I'm overwhelmed with frustration. Here are some pictures of my dogs with those 'horrible results'. First one their noses are blurry/out of focus, 2nd one one dog is in focus the other is out. They were taken with 50mm prime f/1.8


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gjl711
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Post edited over 1 year ago by gjl711.
     
Dec 04, 2017 13:32 |  #2

Your not seeing out of focus but narrow depth of field. Though you will get better sharpness from a full frame camera in part due to the larger image sensor one negative is when framing an image the same way between a crop and FF camera, the DOF is significantly less.

So why shoot at f/1.8? For those two images you could have shot at f/8 and significantly increased your DOF.


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MalVeauX
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Dec 04, 2017 13:44 |  #3

Nothing wrong with your equipment.

You just need to take a step back and learn more about the exposure triangle, depth of field, and what all those attributes effect.

Everything you see here is user error I'm afraid. The first image you're at F1.8 at what is likely 2 feet or less from the subject's, so the depth of field is less than an inch probably. In the 2nd, your focus point was on the wall/branch behind the dogs, not on the dogs, and again at F1.8 depth of field wasn't sufficient to include them in the area in focus.

So rest assured, your equipment is fine.
Just brush yourself up some and you'll be good to go.

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Dec 04, 2017 13:51 |  #4

Also, make sure that you use a single focus point chosen manually so the camera will focus on what you want rather than what it thinks you want.


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Bassat
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Dec 04, 2017 13:54 |  #5

Research the topic "depth of field".
Play with the numbers here: http://www.dofmaster.c​om/dofjs.html (external link)

Your 6D is working fine. So is your 50mm f/1.8 lens. This effect is something a lot of shooters strive for. Some folks actually like it. I am not one of them. To my tastes, lots of folks way overdo this kind of stuff, end up with photos like the two you posted, and brag about how good they (the shooter and the photo) are.

To get both dogs in focus in a shot like #1, you'll need the smallest aperture you can get. Even f/22 may not be enough. The answer is wider (small focal length number) lens such as a 24mm, or possibly even wider.

To get both dogs in focus in a shot like #2, you'll need f/5.6 to f/8, I'm guessing.

Managing depth of field is the photographer's job. You will love this aspect of photography once you master it. Happy shooting.




  
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saea501
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Dec 04, 2017 14:06 |  #6

Oksana Gereaue wrote in post #18510401 (external link)
Soembody please help! I switched from rebelt5 to a Canon 6d (fullframe) in hopes of getting sharper, crisper pictures.

This statement indicates to me that you were getting unsatisfactory results with your T5 as well.

The pictures posted above show exactly what has been stated previously. Your troubles seem to be with your technique. All of the suggestions above are the steps you need to take and will almost certainly lead to much better pictures.

Learn more about the exposure triangle and learn more about your 6D. The one thing I can tell you is that the 6D takes some time to get used to.

By the way......full frame is not necessarily going to give you 'sharper, crisper' pictures. ;-)a

Good luck.


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Bongcruz
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Dec 10, 2017 11:18 |  #7

i hope you don't feel like your getting "attacked". these are all tips from these guys. Besides, everyone should strive for feedback in order to know what they can improve.




  
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Tom ­ Reichner
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Post edited over 1 year ago by Tom Reichner.
     
Dec 10, 2017 11:49 |  #8

In the two photos you posted, what was it that you focused on?

With a DSLR (especially full frame), you don't just aim your camera at the thing you want to take a picture of and click the shutter. . You have to specifically focus on the part of the photo that you want to be in focus. You can either do this manually, or use the 6D's auto focus function to do this. . But, either way, focus is something that is done intentionally, and you have to be the one to decide what part of the photo you want to be in focus.

In the first photo, it looks like you focused on the eyes of the dog to the left. . So that is what is in focus. . You probably didn't even realize that you were focusing on the left dog's eyes, but you were. . You need to be conscious of what you are focusing on.

In the second photo, it looks like you focused on the green leaf that is to the right of the rear dog's butt. . Is that green leaf really the thing that you wanted to be in focus? . Well, if not, then you shouldn't have focused on it.

.


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Mathmans
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Dec 11, 2017 08:41 as a reply to  @ Tom Reichner's post |  #9

I would say you have a back focus problem. At least I can see it on the second photo.
The dog in front and everything in front of that dog is blurry. The dog behind is somehow sharp and everything behind is also sharp.
This is not narrow depth of field.


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Post edited over 1 year ago by TeamSpeed. (4 edits in all)
     
Dec 11, 2017 08:51 |  #10

Mathmans wrote in post #18515286 (external link)
I would say you have a back focus problem. At least I can see it on the second photo.
The dog in front and everything in front of that dog is blurry. The dog behind is somehow sharp and everything behind is also sharp.
This is not narrow depth of field.

Depends on what the AF mode was. If this was all points, and control was given to the camera to decide, then the areas of greater contrast took over. 3 shades of black/brown in the shade just isn't going to capture Auto AF points, but sunlit leaves will. Neither dog is in focus, the foliage behind the dogs are.

I suspect center point AF wasn't selected here (or any AF point really), but that is the first question before assuming issues with AF. Was the camera deciding which points to use, or did the owner select a specific one?

As to the first situation, 50mm at f1.8 on the 6D at those distances only gives you about a thumb's length of focus, and that is what happened here. With a rebel, you would have been farther back, and that would have created a greater DOF than what it did with the 6D.


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fordmondeo
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Dec 11, 2017 08:54 |  #11

As has been said, without knowing what the camera focused on it's hard to say in the second picture.

I'll go out on a limb here and say the problem in picture #1 is not DOF but you are outside the minimum focus distance of the lens regarding the dogs nose.


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Dec 11, 2017 08:56 |  #12

fordmondeo wrote in post #18515296 (external link)
As has been said, without knowing what the camera focused on it's hard to say in the second picture.

I'll go out on a limb here and say the problem in picture #1 is not DOF but you are outside the minimum focus distance of the lens regarding the dogs nose.

They don't say they focused on the noise, they simply stated they expected the noses to also be in focus. One would never really focus on a dog's nose, but rather their eyes, correct? This appears to be very much an issue of real DOF vs expectation. In this case, f11 would have probably been enough to have their entire eyes to nose in focus.


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Dec 11, 2017 09:02 |  #13

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18515297 (external link)
They don't say they focused on the noise, they simply stated they expected the noses to also be in focus. One would never really focus on a dog's nose, but rather their eyes, correct? This is very much an issue of real DOF vs expectation. In this case, f11 would have probably been enough to have their entire eyes to nose in focus.

They don't say they focused on anything.
The fact is, regardless of aperture, if part of your subject is too close it will not be in focus.
I doubt a 50mm lens at f22 could capture a dogs nose pushed up against it, you just can't get the hyperfocal range.


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Post edited over 1 year ago by TeamSpeed. (14 edits in all)
     
Dec 11, 2017 09:04 as a reply to  @ fordmondeo's post |  #14

Sure, that may be the next issue to deal with, but the eyes are in focus inside what appears to be about 4-5", so increasing DOF has to be resolved first. There is a 14" MFD on that lens, just over 1 foot.

Given the DOF being about 4-5", that puts the dogs out at about 5' from the subject at 50mm at f1.8. If the dogs were really right up on the lens, the DOF at 14"MFD would be less than 1". CLEARLY not the case here...

Questions to be answered:
1) Are the photos all the full frame, or are either/both cropped? (Assuming photo is cropped a bit to show the issue)
2) What AF mode is used? (Assuming all points)
3) What was the distance to the dogs on the first shot? (not all that pertinent, other to determine DOF values) (Assuming about 4-5 feet out)


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Dec 11, 2017 09:17 |  #15

f1.8 is your problem. Like many have said above you need to study up on the exposure triangle and learn how the settings on your camera work with, and against, each other.


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Canon 6D not producing sharp pictures!
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