Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Bird Talk 
Thread started 04 Jan 2017 (Wednesday) 19:20
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Show off your 'Yard Studio'

 
MedicineMan4040
The Magic Johnson of Cameras
Avatar
14,551 posts
Gallery: 1369 photos
Best ofs: 7
Likes: 37057
Joined Jul 2013
     
Jan 09, 2017 23:28 |  #16

OK, this tree didn't not grow here in the backyard.
It died about a mile from here in another neighbor's yard.
I asked if I could buy it, he said I could have it.
The yard workers cut it down, hauled it to my place.
Dug a big hole with a big steel pole and poured concrete; then
used a backhoe to lift up this tree (which is hollow) than sat it
down on the pole.
So a pic of the tree and a smaller pic of it's rewards.
We call the tree Levina's tree :)
Oh, the tree cost $100 to have move and installed, I'd call that
a deal.

IMAGE: https://c7.staticflickr.com/1/682/31265632654_c9c31a9011_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/PCQx​iY  (external link) The Tree (external link) by MedicineMan4040 (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: https://c3.staticflickr.com/1/615/31841373090_92c23ba6c8_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/QvHm​Td  (external link) Minolta 400mm APO MFA +7 (external link) by MedicineMan4040 (external link), on Flickr

flickr (external link)
Vid Collection: https://www.youtube.co​m/user/medicineman4040 (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
chrisa
Senior Member
973 posts
Gallery: 65 photos
Likes: 358
Joined May 2005
Location: Effingham, IL
     
Jan 20, 2017 08:47 |  #17

Nothing fancy


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
cbay1
Member
Avatar
121 posts
Gallery: 16 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 602
Joined Dec 2014
Location: Southwest Missouri
     
May 01, 2017 19:29 |  #18

Glad i visited this thread. I was under the impression most of the bird photographers on here were traveling long distances on walkabouts to get their bird shots. Up hill both ways in remote national parks. LOL Now i feel much better knowing i'm not alone on using perches and the ole trusty sunflower seed!


Chris
My flickr https://www.flickr.com​/photos/130798075@N03/ (external link)flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bones519
Senior Member
Avatar
267 posts
Gallery: 83 photos
Likes: 520
Joined Dec 2011
Location: Ontario, CAN
     
May 03, 2017 06:36 |  #19

cbay1 wrote in post #18343920 (external link)
Glad i visited this thread. I was under the impression most of the bird photographers on here were traveling long distances on walkabouts to get their bird shots. Up hill both ways in remote national parks. LOL Now i feel much better knowing i'm not alone on using perches and the ole trusty sunflower seed!

I was of the same mind Chris...lol! I had just picked up the Sigma 150-600 and I'm about to setup a feeder station in our backyard. Birding is new to me and I'm really looking forward to it. Trekking and travelling will come once I develop a few skills.

Thanks to all for your tips and ideas.

-Bryan




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
GeoffSFAs10
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
1,145 posts
Gallery: 25 photos
Likes: 1848
Joined Jul 2007
Location: St.Louis, MO
     
May 03, 2017 08:54 |  #20

Im actually going to post mine this weekend when the rain stops. Everything is filling back in with greenery and flowers. I do travel around and take bird photos on the side, but most of my stuff is in my yard


5Dc | 7D | 17-40 | 85 F1.8 | 40 STM | 28-135 | 100-400 | 550EX
"When you do things right, people wont be sure you've done anything at all"
Flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
BlakeC
"Dad was a meat cutter"
Avatar
2,673 posts
Gallery: 372 photos
Likes: 668
Joined Jul 2014
Location: West Michigan, USA
     
May 03, 2017 09:01 |  #21

MalVeauX wrote in post #18233556 (external link)
Hrm,

I'm still pumping away with my old feeder project. It has evolved over time, and is no longer an outhouse style pop-up tent blind near a feeder. The feeder itself hasn't changed. I have changed it's location a bit, to get it more out of the sun, and I've done some brush clearing work to get some branches and weeds and foliage in general from right behind the station to give me a little more subject isolation. I've replaced my outhouse tent with a standing blind, because it got really hot in the tent. I used some re-bar that I hammered into the ground to act as stabilizing posts and dropped small bore PVC on there and made a frame big enough to sit behind. I zip-tied some weather resistant camo blind material across the frame. I just stick the lens hood through and I'm set. Things I've added is that sometimes I will use lighting. Straight studio lighting, big octas on stands. Silly maybe, but I've enjoyed the results and the birds don't mind it as much as I thought they would. I like lighting when possible because it helps bring out micro-contrast on feather detail. And if the light is really awful but the feeder is super active, I can always get enough light (just not as attractive ambient blends maybe...).

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/LK12​4J  (external link) IMG_0063 (external link) by Martin Wise (external link), on Flickr

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/MbFG​cv  (external link) IMG_0066 (external link) by Martin Wise (external link), on Flickr

I started adding speedlights. I like the Yongnuo 560 III manual lights because I can control their output remotely so once I button them up in a modifier, I can still adjust them, and they're inexpensive (I buy them used around $50 when I see them go up). Realistically I could use a basic strobe, of which I have many, and I have wireless strobes too on the order of 600ws, but I like how light and simple speedlites are and I don't have to fiddle with it, I can get behind the blind and do everything remotely. Granted, now that I have an ETTL & HSS capable speedlite with the Yongnuo 685, I would probably consider having two of those instead (though they're $100 a pop), since HSS & ETTL make for a very handy lighting session, and I can also command those remotely too all the same, but HSS & ETTL gives options for controlling ambient and subject lighting a lot more than a pure manual light does. Only reason I haven't done it yet is because I rarely need to. When I set up, I control flash output remotely with my controller (560-TX) and if I want ambient exposure to increase, I adjust ISO. Simple. I do an initial metering with a light meter with an incident light reading at the feeder station to get an idea of where my flash output should be. After that I don't have to meter anymore, as I can adjust around that value with my camera settings to get my desired exposures.

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/M458​sG  (external link) IMG_4124 (external link) by Martin Wise (external link), on Flickr

To do lighting, I use the camera in manual and meter with it first with my sync settings. In this case, I set my camera to manual, 1/200s sync speed, F5.6 (depth of field and sharpness) and metered, then adjusted my ISO until it was about -1 stop, so a gentle under-exposure of the foliage with ambient light. Then I plug these values into my light meter to get flash exposure correct, so I plug 1/200s and ISO 320 (which is what I ended up metering on the camera for ambient) and adjust flash power until it reads F5.6 on the output where my subject will be located (I metered center and slightly in front of the perches).

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/M6GL​DF  (external link) IMG_4141 (external link) by Martin Wise (external link), on Flickr

Here's the 560-TX on my camear setup. I've really been using the 7D & 300 F4L IS combination a lot more than my 600mm. I can get really close. The F4 is nice. The IS is nice. And it's light and simple. It rides a humble Opteka Gimbal on a Benro tripod.

https://flic.kr/p/LgGe​zX (external link)IMG_4128 (external link) by Martin Wise (external link), on Flickr

And here we are with a 47" Brolly Octa (cheap, $30!) with those speedlites inside doing the lighting. I went big with the modifier for the same reason you do in a studio, softer light.

https://flic.kr/p/LgFT​PV (external link)img_a1326_stitch (external link) by Martin Wise (external link), on Flickr

And here's one of my visitors:

https://flic.kr/p/M47z​rG (external link)IMG_3537 (external link) by Martin Wise (external link), on Flickr

Very best,

These are cool! Do you ever move to get a different shot while the birds are there or do you readjust and wait for them to settle again?

One thought though, if any of you have a camera with wifi or bluetooth, you can just set it up on a tripod and sit inside and take photos using your phone or tablet as a remote viewer!
I've done it with my 70D and works great! Once it stops raining here, I will try to set it up again and get some shots. We have some bright Blue Jays and Cardinals coming around now!


Blake C
BlakeC-Photography.com (external link)
Follow Me on Facebook (external link) , Instagram (external link), or Google+ (external link)
80D |70D | SL1 - Σ 18-35 1.8 ART, Σ 50-100 1.8 ART, Σ 17-50 2.8, Canon 24 2.8 Pancake, Canon 50 1.8 STM, Canon 10-18 STM, Canon 18-135 STM

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Tom ­ Reichner
"I am a little creepy"
Avatar
12,065 posts
Gallery: 140 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 2840
Joined Dec 2008
Location: Omak, in north-central Washington state, USA
     
Dec 21, 2017 23:06 |  #22

cbay1 wrote in post #18343920 (external link)
I was under the impression most of the bird photographers on here were traveling long distances on walkabouts to get their bird shots. Up hill both ways in remote national parks. LOL Now i feel much better knowing i'm not alone on using perches and the ole trusty sunflower seed!

.
Oh, my goodness - no, that is not at all how most of the accomplished bird photographers get their shots.

Typically, the more wild and remote an area is, the less used to humans the birds and wildlife are. . Birds and animals in remote areas tend to hide or flee from people. . So it is usually not a good idea to go into real wilderness for wildlife photography. . I spend a lot of time in remote wilderness areas, but I hardly ever get good pictures there.

The places that most wildlife photographers want to target are the areas where the animals and birds are exposed to a lot of people. . When the critters are used to seeing people all the time, they become "habituated", which is a term that means they become used to close human proximity. . These are the critters that we can get good pictures of, because they tolerate us being with them at close range for long periods of time.

Parks, refuges, nature centers, backyards, and areas around boat launches and campgrounds are the types of areas where one is most likely to get world-class bird and wildlife imagery.

.
.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Grizz1
Goldmember
Avatar
1,586 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Likes: 388
Joined Apr 2011
Location: Northeast Missouri
     
Feb 08, 2018 22:25 |  #23

IMAGE: https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4708/39262487195_a9d39c3383_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/22Pu​vyp  (external link) IMG_7815 (external link) by steve findling (external link), on Flickr
This may belong in Larry's thread on what we have learned about birds but it is my yard where I hope to shoot Woodpeckers when spare time and weather cooperate.
I picked up this old tree limb while cutting firewood, drilled a series of 1/2 inch diameter holes 1 1/2 inch deep, randomly spaced on a 4 foot section of the log. I fill the holes with suet then just lean it against another live tree in my yard. I had been using the wire type feeders that hold a block of suet and hang from a branch that seem to be constantly moving. Many birds are using this log now and they are consuming many more of the suet cakes now. I've seen as many as 4 Woodpeckers at once on it, usually the same species although Downy's, Hairy's and Nuthatches get along and will share. At my place the occasional Flicker rules, Red Bellies next, Red Headed, Hairy's, Downy and last Nuthatches. If I place it at a steeper angle it seems to be used less by Blue Jays , shallow angle and the Jays will clean it out in no time. The birds seem to like some of the more natural feeders I use, they do not use the wire suet feeders now preferring this old log. It takes more time to fill the holes but more enjoyable to watch them climbing up and down this old limb.

Steve
2 Canon 60D's, 70D 18-135,-55-250, Sigma 150-500 OS,Sigma 50mm 1.4 ,Sigma 120-300 Sport,Sigma 10-20. 580EXII

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
KT29
Goldmember
2,561 posts
Gallery: 58 photos
Likes: 1990
Joined Sep 2010
Location: N.Idaho
     
Feb 10, 2018 20:28 |  #24

Grizz1 wrote in post #18559723 (external link)
QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/22Pu​vyp  (external link) IMG_7815 (external link) by steve findling (external link), on Flickr
This may belong in Larry's thread on what we have learned about birds but it is my yard where I hope to shoot Woodpeckers when spare time and weather cooperate.
I picked up this old tree limb while cutting firewood, drilled a series of 1/2 inch diameter holes 1 1/2 inch deep, randomly spaced on a 4 foot section of the log. I fill the holes with suet then just lean it against another live tree in my yard. I had been using the wire type feeders that hold a block of suet and hang from a branch that seem to be constantly moving. Many birds are using this log now and they are consuming many more of the suet cakes now. I've seen as many as 4 Woodpeckers at once on it, usually the same species although Downy's, Hairy's and Nuthatches get along and will share. At my place the occasional Flicker rules, Red Bellies next, Red Headed, Hairy's, Downy and last Nuthatches. If I place it at a steeper angle it seems to be used less by Blue Jays , shallow angle and the Jays will clean it out in no time. The birds seem to like some of the more natural feeders I use, they do not use the wire suet feeders now preferring this old log. It takes more time to fill the holes but more enjoyable to watch them climbing up and down this old limb.

Nice setup Steve and a great idea. Hope to see more pics of the birds using this setup.ߘ


Terry

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Grizz1
Goldmember
Avatar
1,586 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Likes: 388
Joined Apr 2011
Location: Northeast Missouri
     
Feb 10, 2018 21:44 |  #25

Terry, I sure hope to get some time in shooting birds and Wildlife before winter is over and I'll be sure to share.
Today I was working outside not far from this suet feeder log and kept hearing Woodpeckers making a fuss like there was a hawk or cat near them. They were Downy's, Hairy and Nuthatches, after looking the suet was completely gone so after filling they quieted down and began feeding. They are hooked on this log rather than the store bought feeders, I guess because they like climbing up and down it searching for food and probably comfortable for them.


Steve
2 Canon 60D's, 70D 18-135,-55-250, Sigma 150-500 OS,Sigma 50mm 1.4 ,Sigma 120-300 Sport,Sigma 10-20. 580EXII

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
pcs
Senior Member
Avatar
251 posts
Gallery: 212 photos
Likes: 1843
Joined Apr 2010
Location: The Netherlands
     
Jun 05, 2018 11:30 |  #26


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
birder_herper
Senior Member
724 posts
Likes: 18
Joined Feb 2009
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
     
Jun 10, 2018 08:10 |  #27

I enjoy this thread and I want to keep it alive. Just my simple setup. It is five feeders on a WildBirds Unlimited pole with raccoon baffle (also prevents squirrels). I have a tray feeder, finch (nyjer) feeder, a safflower/sunflower feeder, a dome feeder (prevents large birds from entering) and a suet sandwich for woodpeckers. It was a lot of trial and error but this setup finally deterred starlings from enjoying all the while still attracting doves, jays, cardinals, finches, sparrows, woodpeckers, chickadees, nuthatches and grackles (yes, I do like grackles).


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ardeekay
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,664 posts
Gallery: 57 photos
Likes: 1011
Joined Feb 2010
Location: Peoria, Il. and Port Aransas, Tx
     
Jun 10, 2018 15:01 |  #28

Looks well thought out and is certainly nice looking. Any ideas at the ground re. the mess? I've been debating a circle maybe about 8 feet dial. and fill with wood mulch. Burn my leaves there then in the fall.(Relocating the feeder of course.)


Rog
Gear:7Dll 7D 40D 24-105 4L, 70-200 4L, 300 4L IS, 85 1.8, 1.4 TC, Tamron18-270VC, Sigma 150-600 OS 430EX II

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
pcs
Senior Member
Avatar
251 posts
Gallery: 212 photos
Likes: 1843
Joined Apr 2010
Location: The Netherlands
     
Jun 16, 2018 01:10 |  #29

While I do like the jackdaw's they eat everything I put out so for the smaller birds we have this:


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
MalVeauX
"Looks rough and well used"
Avatar
12,729 posts
Gallery: 1114 photos
Best ofs: 3
Likes: 8160
Joined Feb 2013
Location: Florida
     
Jun 16, 2018 09:08 |  #30

BlakeC wrote in post #18345183 (external link)
These are cool! Do you ever move to get a different shot while the birds are there or do you readjust and wait for them to settle again?

One thought though, if any of you have a camera with wifi or bluetooth, you can just set it up on a tripod and sit inside and take photos using your phone or tablet as a remote viewer!
I've done it with my 70D and works great! Once it stops raining here, I will try to set it up again and get some shots. We have some bright Blue Jays and Cardinals coming around now!

Forgive my ridiculous tardiness here, I guess I didn't subscribe and lost this thread somehow!

I rarely move, I set up the feeder so that everything is in a horizontal plane relative to my camera so that my depth of field will remain shallow, even when stopped down, and cream out the background foliage. It's also to keep visitors from landing in difficult to see places and missing opportunities. It's also set up specific to the angle of light in the morning/evening to prevent back lighting and to avoid harsh sunlight creeping into the field of view as much as possible.

I've done the remote thing too; manually, but ultimately I prefer to do it myself and compose myself. :)

Very best,


My Flickr (external link) :: My Astrobin (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

13,232 views & 81 likes for this thread
Show off your 'Yard Studio'
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Bird Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is PhotosByLena
480 guests, 379 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.