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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 24 Feb 2018 (Saturday) 04:57
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Background light

 
Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Feb 24, 2018 16:53 |  #16

FerozeK wrote in post #18571398 (external link)
I feel if you paying me to do something I should put the maximum effort into it. Its not about the money, I just always try hard at everything

That is more or less what I'm trying to achieve

I'm using this currently http://www.benel.eu …studio-flash-ss-150d.html (external link)

What I mean by "trying too hard" is that the solution is simple. Purchasing a new light adds unnecessary complexity and will probably do nothing to achieve the goal.

Wrap a piece of paper around the end of the outside of the strobe and tape it in place as a cylinder to make a wide snoot. You can make the cylinder into a cone to vary the aperture of the end of the snoot to create a larger or smaller spot of light. Varying the length of the cone/cylinder, and the distance between the light and the background will vary the resulting light fall off.

It might not be a glamorous solution, but at the least it will give you an idea what is possible, and maybe enough information to know what type/size "proper" snoot to purchase.


PSA: The above post may contain sarcasm, reply at your own risk | Not in gear database: Auto Sears 50mm 2.0 / 3x CL-360, Nikon SB-28, SunPak auto 322 D, Minolta 20

  
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FerozeK
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Post edited 4 months ago by FerozeK.
     
Feb 24, 2018 16:59 as a reply to  @ Left Handed Brisket's post |  #17

I actually have a snoot for this light, and a honeycomb grid. I thought that was only used for hair lights, not as a background light. I thought barn doors was used for backgrounds and to control light spills, which is they way I had it set up.




  
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Wilt
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Post edited 4 months ago by Wilt.
     
Feb 24, 2018 17:12 |  #18

FerozeK wrote in post #18571427 (external link)
I actually have a snoot for this light, and a honeycomb grid. I thought that was only used for hair lights, not as a background light. I thought barn doors was used for backgrounds and to control light spills, which is they way I had it set up.

I have used grids very successfully to locally light backdrops, either in a reflective manner or in transmissive lighting with gels.
My use of barndoors is as you describe...to flag off unwanted light, but not used often.
While I have snoot, I never found it to be a great usefulness, other than hairlight


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FerozeK
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Feb 24, 2018 17:39 as a reply to  @ Wilt's post |  #19

I may not have typed that properly, its the barndoors that have the grid, looks like this:
http://www.benel.eu …-and-filters-sfa-bhc.html (external link)




  
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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Feb 24, 2018 19:18 |  #20

Wilt wrote in post #18571433 (external link)
While I have snoot, I never found it to be a great usefulness, other than hairlight

There might be a better term than "snoot" for what I am describing, but I don't know what it is.

I think a snoot is typically thought of as a cone that makes a small circle of light with a fairly hard edge. But a larger circle with a softer edge can be made too.


I once rigged a alien bee standard reflector (external link) with a flat piece of paper over the end and cut a 2 inch/50mm circle in the center. It made a great background light with nice falloff on the edges.

I enjoy messing around with home made light shapers. I can usually come up with something that is as good or better than some off the shelf product.


PSA: The above post may contain sarcasm, reply at your own risk | Not in gear database: Auto Sears 50mm 2.0 / 3x CL-360, Nikon SB-28, SunPak auto 322 D, Minolta 20

  
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Post edited 4 months ago by Left Handed Brisket. (2 edits in all)
     
Feb 27, 2018 07:19 |  #21

just came across this example of the above alien bee standard reflector cardboard mod for the background. It is the full frame of 85mm 6D and final image was cropped tighter.

the background light is on the lowest possible power setting, while an identical unit (at maybe 1/4 power?) is filling a 3 foot umbrella camera right and a large reflector is camera left. The background light is 2-3 feet from the background and pointed at 45 degrees to the grey background paper. Without my mod, the light would have been way too bright and flooded way too large of an area. The area directly behind subject's neck/collar is probably a stop over exposed. Hair light was bare 580EXII.

i would have preferred to have the light farther from the background, but I was working for someone (using their space and equipment) and had limited time and obviously limited resources.


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PSA: The above post may contain sarcasm, reply at your own risk | Not in gear database: Auto Sears 50mm 2.0 / 3x CL-360, Nikon SB-28, SunPak auto 322 D, Minolta 20

  
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FerozeK
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Feb 27, 2018 14:10 as a reply to  @ Left Handed Brisket's post |  #22

That is exactly what I'm trying to achieve. I will try this setup this weekend. Thanks




  
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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Feb 27, 2018 18:05 |  #23

You're welcome.

Please make sure to experiment, but I feel my first idea of a cylinder around the outside of the strobe housing will be a good starting point. Notice on the top of my example the paper gets a little mottled looking. This is because of the close positioning of the light and thus, the angle of the strobe to the paper. With the increased distance from light to paper, the angle gets more acute and the slight wavyness of the paper is more pronounced. If you get the light away from the background the angle will not be so sharp. Every little bit helps.

Good luck and be sure to report back with your results.


PSA: The above post may contain sarcasm, reply at your own risk | Not in gear database: Auto Sears 50mm 2.0 / 3x CL-360, Nikon SB-28, SunPak auto 322 D, Minolta 20

  
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echelonphoto
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Mar 06, 2018 11:21 |  #24

I do lots of portraits on location....use all battery strobes, mainly godox 360 for main, ad200 for fill, one 685 for hair and one 685 for background light. I bought these cheap "strobe socks" on ebay...the are a white diffuser that had an elastic open to attach to the flash...give great subtle feathered background lighting...you aim the reflector straight up and face the sock to the background. Use about half power on the strobe for the effect I like


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