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Thread started 02 Mar 2018 (Friday) 18:52
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How to tell which AFMA is sharpest?

 
gjl711
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Mar 03, 2018 08:03 |  #16

texshooter wrote in post #18576256 (external link)
I'm sure it's easy to see the difference between 0 and +10 AFMA on the ISO12233 chart. But have you tried comparing +9 vs +10 points? Not so easy I bet.

As Teamspeed points out, +/-1 changes are so small that even at f/1.2 you'll be had pressed to notice a difference. Also, PDAF is inherently inaccurate. Rarely with the lens focus to exactly the same. It gets really close, close enough that you will never see the difference in normal shooting, but there are tolerances within the mechanics of the lens.

So as you have already determined that optimal focus is somewhere from -1 to -5, split the difference.


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kirkt
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Mar 05, 2018 08:55 |  #17

You can take a look at the profiles of edges or line pairs or whatever on your target image and decide if there is some meaningful threshold that you are willing to accept as the best value, or you can look at all of the images relative teach other and choose the "best" profile.

Attached is a contrived example that I made in PS - I drew a black line and paired it with a copy with differing arbitrary separation distances - when this is done precisely, these are "line pairs" and the ability of the optical system to discriminate between them is a measure of the spatial resolving power of the system.

I applied a gaussian blur to the lines, progressively increasing the blur, at four levels. I plotted the gray value of lines across the line pairs and looked at the results, compared to the reference. Using the plot of the grayscale profile, you can see how the edges of the lines get softened and their signal decreases as a function of blur. Maybe an evaluation of your target images with particular areas picked out for evaluation can be analyzed this way.

Also, you need to shoot images in the field and evaluate those to really test the "bench top" settings you choose with a target. This is the proof of your setting, not some planar target.

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Post edited 3 months ago by Wilt. (2 edits in all)
     
Mar 05, 2018 10:45 |  #18

The point of AFMA is to get the plane of focus to best coincide with the location of your DESIRED plane of focus.

So you should be looking at scene in which you can assess that the camera AF plane coincides with the location of your desired plane of focus -- NOT 'how sharp' a single plane happens to be.

Look at photos 2 and 3 of this old post to see how you can assess point of best focus with a flat plane target and an inclined plane ruler for location assessment of the plane of focus.
https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?p=8611568


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Mar 05, 2018 10:53 as a reply to  @ Wilt's post |  #19

But Wilt, to really assess what is in focus, you have to zoom in quite a bit. So something like this so you can determine a +1 or -1 adjustment... ;)

I agree though, with just a 100% pixel view (or less actually), the layout you describe works well. There are other versions of the same type of method too.


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Wilt
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Mar 05, 2018 11:10 as a reply to  @ TeamSpeed's post |  #20

In that older thread that I linked, a few posts later windpig made a testimonial about my methology being a good one that he found to be 'best' and 'easiest'.

One must keep in mind that 'in focus' is within Canon's standard of 'within one DOF'.
At 200mm, 50* FL (Canon's suggested test distance) or 394mm yields a 20/20 visual acuity DOF zone which extends only 2.6" in front/behind the plane of focus, and we can clearly determine in photo 3 of my post that plane of focus is best within about 0.5" back...even without 100% view assessment.


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Mar 05, 2018 12:32 |  #21

digital paradise wrote in post #18576400 (external link)
I think the one on the right looks sharper. If you want to take all the guesswork away you may consider this.

http://www.reikan.co.u​k/focalweb/ (external link)

I was about to post the same thing. The scientific approach to MFA.


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kjonnnn
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Mar 05, 2018 12:35 |  #22

The one on the right looks sharper




  
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Mar 05, 2018 14:56 |  #23

at 3200x you're at paralysis by analysis...it's not that critical. You'll never know the difference at print w/ normal viewing distance.


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texshooter
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Post edited 3 months ago by texshooter. (3 edits in all)
     
Mar 06, 2018 19:03 as a reply to  @ DagoImaging's post |  #24

I ran the test again and this time the software recommended -4 AFMA, which is within my visually expected range of -5 to -1, so I will go with that. There are many variables that can skew the software's results, such as focus inconsistency, invisible target glare, widest aperture defects, target-to-camera distance, etc. Best to trust but verify.

But I still stand by my original claim. If the software can tell which nearest neighbor AFMA is sharpest, then there should be a way to replicate that precision in PS using some sort of advanced focusing mask. But, I'll trust the software if, and only if, my eyeballs agree.




  
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How to tell which AFMA is sharpest?
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