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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 28 May 2018 (Monday) 10:09
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Is auto ISO really auto?

 
Lyndön
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Jun 03, 2018 22:39 |  #16

Auto ISO is especially useful on some of the latest cameras like the A7III (and probably some of the top end Canons as well) where the usable high ISO limit is pretty crazy compared to just a couple of generations back.


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monty28428
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Jun 03, 2018 23:39 |  #17

Bardi wrote in post #18638559 (external link)
Monty, Thank you for finding that. I never thought to see if it was inherent to the operating system. That was so frustrating! So, It looks like I need to be more active with my ISO settings or upgrade sooner, haha.


No problem just learn the triangle and all will be good -- Loved my 40D before the ocean ate it :-)




  
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Jun 04, 2018 05:51 |  #18

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18638658 (external link)
Auto ISO with the newer bodies is a thing of beauty, I like it. Auto ISO on the older bodies is crippled in various ways.


Am I right in remembering that they now have EC when shooting in "Manual" mode, so that you set shutter/aperture and let the ISO float? That's probably the only way I would ever really want to use AutoISO, I like to be able to control any two of the three corners. The moment you let the camera control two you have to rely on the programming agreeing with the way you like to shoot.

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TeamSpeed
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Jun 04, 2018 06:33 |  #19

BigAl007 wrote in post #18638810 (external link)
Am I right in remembering that they now have EC when shooting in "Manual" mode, so that you set shutter/aperture and let the ISO float? That's probably the only way I would ever really want to use AutoISO, I like to be able to control any two of the three corners. The moment you let the camera control two you have to rely on the programming agreeing with the way you like to shoot.

Alan

Yes, the 7D2, 5D4, 1DX, 1DX2, and the 6D2, at a minimum, have this. This is how I shoot everything now. ISO is the factor I care about least in a dynamic lighting situation, and would rather only worry about aperture and shutter speeds. The 1D4 had something close if you set it up correctly.

Prior implementations (and there were a few) were less than stellar, with locked in ISO, or a smaller hardwired set of ISO values beyond what the camera would allow the user to shoot at, and no EC in manual mode, where it makes the most sense to use auto ISO.


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Bardi
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Jun 04, 2018 11:58 |  #20

DarenM wrote in post #18638577 (external link)
If you are shooting in maual, than you would not expect the iso to be changing as conditions change because you are controlling the exposure not the camera. I would turn the auto iso off when using manual settings, then you can adjust the iso as needed. Another thought, if you are in changing lighting conditions, manual is not the best to use.


ShutterKlick wrote in post #18638606 (external link)
Blah.. I love setting shutter and f, and let ISO adjust to light as needed. LOVE IT!


TeamSpeed wrote in post #18638658 (external link)
Auto ISO with the newer bodies is a thing of beauty, I like it. Auto ISO on the older bodies is crippled in various ways.


ShutterKlick wrote in post #18638561 (external link)
Meh... just go full manual all the way. Old school.

Andrew

My first DSLR was a T2i and the auto ISO function moved it where needed in M mode. I used it enough that I guess it became habit, and I relied pretty heavily on it. Like ShutterKlick I love it. Fast forward to now and I was just really confused as to why every shot was at 400. I'll have to adapt, we are buying a house so I can't update yet haha.


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Bardi
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Jun 04, 2018 14:28 |  #21

BigAl007 wrote in post #18638810 (external link)
Am I right in remembering that they now have EC when shooting in "Manual" mode, so that you set shutter/aperture and let the ISO float? That's probably the only way I would ever really want to use AutoISO, I like to be able to control any two of the three corners. The moment you let the camera control two you have to rely on the programming agreeing with the way you like to shoot.

Alan


This is how my first camera worked. In manual, I could change aperture and shutter speed and the ISO would change on it's own. I assumed that all cameras worked in that same fashion. Lazy on my part I think.


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Snydremark
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Jun 04, 2018 14:49 |  #22

Bardi wrote in post #18639115 (external link)
This is how my first camera worked. In manual, I could change aperture and shutter speed and the ISO would change on it's own. I assumed that all cameras worked in that same fashion. Lazy on my part I think.

The bigger problem you're going to have with that approach, on older Canon bodies, is that Auto ISO forces you to use the camera-determined xposure settings; there is no Exposure Compensation (EC) available on those bodies. This will result in a higher than desired "too dark" or "too bright" outcomes vs being able to use EC to compensate for various lighting conditions and subjects.

If you aren't using one of the bodies TS listed above (or newer) that support Auto-ISO + EC, I strongly suggest removing it from your rotation and just learning basic metering with a given ISO based on your current shooting situation.

I shot the 40d for years; it's a rock solid camera overall...but, auto-iso is complete crap on it. Besides, taking some time to learn the exposure triangle and understanding *why* the camera sets the settings it does in any auto mode will help you much more in the long run.


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Jun 04, 2018 15:34 as a reply to  @ Snydremark's post |  #23

Yeah, trying to look at the positive side of things I think this may force me into learning fundamentals instead of relying on auto settings. I'm ok with that.


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Jun 04, 2018 15:51 |  #24

Bardi wrote in post #18634380 (external link)
Background: New guy. Shooting for about 5 full months. Have learned a ton, but still new guy. I started with a Canon T2i then just shifted recently to a 40D.

When I shoot auto ISO on the 40D, it seems its always at 400, regardless to whats going on. On the T2i there seemed to be tons of movement as the situation changed. I noticed this morning while shooting some flowers, that the ISO was repeatedly at 400.

Is this a camera thing? (Mine is pretty old) A technique thing? (I am the new guy) Or something different all together.

Curious now if I should also come off of Auto WB............


Thanks in advance


Yes. Auto ISO is really auto. The camera selects the ISO to expose your image in 18% gray based on available light and your aperture and shutter speed. Auto ISO is a good choice when shooting in changing light conditions. I prefer to expand metering area when shooting auto ISO. That is, don’t spot meter. Also, use exposure compensation to push the exposure to the right.


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Jun 04, 2018 16:02 as a reply to  @ Larry Johnson's post |  #25

I generally only shoot evaluative metering. I haven't played with exposure compensation yet, I haven't obtained any post processing yet, so I'm trying to get best quality images in camera that I can at the moment.

We found through this thread that my particular camera (40D) locks in the 'Auto ISO' in manual at 400. The benefit is it will force me into learning the exposure triangle now instead of relying on my camera to do that for me. I'll call it a win for now.


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Jun 04, 2018 16:21 |  #26

Bardi wrote in post #18639170 (external link)
I generally only shoot evaluative metering. I haven't played with exposure compensation yet, I haven't obtained any post processing yet, so I'm trying to get best quality images in camera that I can at the moment.

We found through this thread that my particular camera (40D) locks in the 'Auto ISO' in manual at 400. The benefit is it will force me into learning the exposure triangle now instead of relying on my camera to do that for me. I'll call it a win for now.

Check out these threads,
https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=66836
https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=744235

in conjunction with good literary sources such as Peterson's Understanding Exposure books. The books themselves are good, broad reference but leave out (somewhat intentionally) a few, key points that you'll get from using other resources at the same time.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
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Jun 04, 2018 17:09 |  #27

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18638658 (external link)
Auto ISO with the newer bodies is a thing of beauty, I like it. Auto ISO on the older bodies is crippled in various ways.


^^^ ...crippled so badly that, after testing uncovered the flaws of the implementation, I would not ever attempt to use Auto ISO for shooting regularly until after my purchase of 7DII


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Bardi
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Jun 04, 2018 18:16 |  #28

Snydremark wrote in post #18639179 (external link)
Check out these threads,
https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=66836
https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=744235

in conjunction with good literary sources such as Peterson's Understanding Exposure books. The books themselves are good, broad reference but leave out (somewhat intentionally) a few, key points that you'll get from using other resources at the same time.

Now there's a rabbit hole. Thanks for the links. This place is great!


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Jun 07, 2018 19:06 |  #29

FWIW, even though its been voted down by the populace of the Enterwebs (that has never shot with one, uh emm) my D7500's Auto ISO is a graceful wonder. :-)

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Snydremark
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Jun 08, 2018 09:24 |  #30

ShutterKlick wrote in post #18641090 (external link)
FWIW, even though its been voted down by the populace of the Enterwebs (that has never shot with one, uh emm) my D7500's Auto ISO is a graceful wonder. :-)

Andrew

It may be that Nikon did something different with their implementation, uh emm. This discussion, at least, has been centered around Canon's early implementations which are definitely hampered.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
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Is auto ISO really auto?
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