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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Weddings & Other Family Events 
Thread started 08 Jun 2018 (Friday) 03:27
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I could never be a wedding photographer . . .

 
UKseagull
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Jun 08, 2018 03:27 |  #1

My younger sister, cajoled me into taking a few photos of her friends, at her wedding last weekend.

The thought of doing wedding photography gives me the shivers, I don't feel comfortable in crowds at the best of times. I'd been asked to take some photos of people at the weding, not of the wedding itself. No joke, my hands were literally shaking when I got the camera out of the bag. Any way, I took a couple of photos of my sister and her husband and I'm quite pleased with them.

I was stood off to the side with this one, no doubt that's a no no with wedding photography?

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Colin ­ Glover
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Jun 08, 2018 12:00 |  #2

It's generally better to get a straight on shot,


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and then a side on. It looks as if you were second shooting. Side on is for during the ceremony as you can't get behind or in front of the vicar, pastor or registrar. The above examples illustrate this .


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stathunter
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Jun 08, 2018 12:22 |  #3

It is an art, most people don't understand the difficulties and what it takes. Truth is most people who are "photographers" think they can do it and what makes me cringe is watching other "wedding" photographers that are bad.

(I do weddings) And was a guest at a wedding where the photographer walked around during the ceremony and walked on the stage during the ceremony, in between the bride and groom then walked around everyone on stage taking photos. I honestly thought it was a comedy skit or something......until I realized they had no idea what they were doing.....I was so close to yelling get the $#%^ the stage.

After the service I ran into the "photographer" and told him that he had to be one of the worst wedding photographers I have ever witnessed.

It is a relief to have someone know what their limitations are.


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Road ­ Dog
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Jun 08, 2018 16:25 as a reply to  @ stathunter's post |  #4

I've shot a total of one wedding and, if I'm smart enough to know anything, it's that I never want to shoot a second.

I shot the first one for friends, for a few hundred bucks. Thankfully the bride's aunt was there and, because she was a wedding coordinator, knew how to pose people, who to put next to who, yadayadayada. If she wasn't there it would've been an unqualified disaster.

The couple was very happy with the results and, to be honest, I thought they were pretty damn good, too.

But I figure it this way: Where weddings are concerned, I'm battin' 1.000 and I don't wanna' screw that up!


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OhLook
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Jun 08, 2018 17:46 |  #5

UKseagull wrote in post #18641295 (external link)
I was stood off to the side with this one, no doubt that's a no no with wedding photography?

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Maybe pros have a rule against such a pose, I don't know, but I see nothing wrong with this photo as long as straight-on shots are also provided. Let the couple decide.


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mascon
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Jun 09, 2018 18:16 as a reply to  @ OhLook's post |  #6

I agree


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Colin ­ Glover
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Jun 10, 2018 09:10 as a reply to  @ OhLook's post |  #7

There's absolutely nothing wrong with the shot whatsoever. What I said was that it's best to get both. Two different perspectives are better than one, as long as you can tell it's different to the other. I'll shoot burst mode, and maybe two or three in the burst are virtually identical. In that case I give just the one.

When I shoot weddings, the more different angles I can get of the same pose, the more shots I can deliver to the couple.


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so in the above two images we have the moment before the kiss, and the kiss itself which are obviously different. I'll also do mono conversions or even colour pops, and in my first pose, both had a full colour version as well. Some I'll crop as well, to give the wide angle, and the close up, as long as IQ doesn't suffer. A 55 or 70-200 or 250 on your second body will let you get both a wide and a close up without the need to change lenses.

Your exposure and IQ are spot on so well done. If you shoot a few weddings then you get used to it. However, my son in law was asked to get extra shots of his friends wedding a few years ago, but he wasn't used to the lighting, and was badly placed, so it was a disaster for him. He has his own studio gear and is brilliant at portraits.

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john ­ crossley
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Jun 10, 2018 11:08 |  #8

UKseagull wrote in post #18641295 (external link)
My younger sister, cajoled me into taking a few photos of her friends, at her wedding last weekend.

The thought of doing wedding photography gives me the shivers, I don't feel comfortable in crowds at the best of times. I'd been asked to take some photos of people at the weding, not of the wedding itself. No joke, my hands were literally shaking when I got the camera out of the bag. Any way, I took a couple of photos of my sister and her husband and I'm quite pleased with them.

I was stood off to the side with this one, no doubt that's a no no with wedding photography?

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/26UQ​jWE  (external link) FB4B4100 (external link) by Andy Aveyard (external link), on Flickr


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IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/25ft​zoQ  (external link) FB4B4119m (external link) by Andy Aveyard (external link), on Flickr

An excellent pair of images. Much better than what a lot of so called professionals take.


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George ­ Zip
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Jun 11, 2018 03:22 |  #9

I like the second one. Nice image.

I take a lot of pride doing a good job. What kills me is that often your best work is overlooked. I get why.... emotion or something funny will always trump a crafted photo for the majority of people.

Case in point. I did one recently and I had been having friendly banter with the mum of one of the bridesmaids,all day. The bride got ready at her house/ Anyway I got a photo of her giving me the finger which was very good natured. It can be in Australia

Anyway... that was the hit of all the photos. Also it wasn’t my photos they were all talking about ( I found out this in an email of thanks from the father of the groom) they all thought I was a lot of fun and vaguely amusing. I got two more weddings out of it.




  
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Jun 11, 2018 04:21 |  #10

my niece in law (nephew's wife) has a bachelor's degree in nursing but she leads the two of them in wedding photography. they do destination weddings and are in high demand. i only mention the nursing degree because she has zero photography training other than maybe a couple of basic photo classes...

shes had many images published in the different wedding/bride magazines. she does great work, not necessarily my style (the kind of washed out. un-saturated, dreamy look) but they do really well with the business...

my nephew does 2nd shooter and most of the staging i think...


that being said, i think the photos you posted are fabulous! i didnt look super close (on my 7" tablet) for any technical "flaws" but i like what you shared...

and i TOO, dont ever want to shoot weddings. i did 2 back in the film days, one for a couple (friends) in a civil ceremony and another couple in a very small wedding. nope. not going to do it again. someone else can deal with doing that....




  
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Jun 11, 2018 08:00 |  #11

My daughter just recently married. I hired an ex-coworker and very nice guy to do the photos. I saved costs by restricting the amount of time he had to be there (since my brother and father both are photographers and could take photos during the other parts of the day), and I would process all raw files myself. He ended up staying longer and brought a 2nd shooter, so I added about 30% to the payment since I felt bad that he spent more time and brought somebody else. I also made sure both of them partook of the food since I know a photographer works up an appetite and has no real time to eat during a job except when everyone else is eating.

He was great, and I appreciate all the time he spent just being there and working with folks, having done weddings myself. I don't think I could do that for a full-time gig that is for sure, I am too introverted to really direct people in posing etc. I love being the 2nd shooter though. I told him if he ever needs a 2nd shooter and was in a bind, I would be his wingman.


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digital ­ paradise
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Jun 11, 2018 09:01 |  #12

I became friends with work associate who is about half my age. He was into Canon as well. He begged me to shoot his wedding and I finally broke down ignoring all the basic non-formal rules about shooting a first wedding and a friends or family members wedding. We later became shooting partners.

I started to prepare 6 months in advance. Most of it flash photography. When the day came I felt no where near ready. The technical side was OK but out of everything I found posing people the hardest thing to do. I had the list of basic and money shots which I studied the night before. Try to remember all that the next day while you worried about the technical side, trying not to miss a shot you have to get and are as best as I can say "trying to herd cats" to get all the members in the shots you need to do. You have to look confident for that 8 hours.

I decided to shoot weddings to make some extra cash for gear. Either posing comes naturally (which does not for me) or is an acquired skill. Like anything else like a new job eventually it becomes second nature. When you do this once every few months you are starting over each time. I figure a good way would be to start as an assistant, learn the ropes and then branch out. I know many successful pros started out on there own. For me the assistant route would have been best.

Dynamic groups of people were easier and fortunately for my first wedding they were. The ones who ask for instructions for everything are tougher.

The first one went well, I shot about 20 more weddings and never had any issues. I remember being so happy when there were shoots in multiple locations that day as it gave me few minutes to myself as I drove to them. You are on "all of the time" at the locations.

I was going for knee replacement surgery so I stopped booking gigs. After not shooting one for about 6 months it occurred to me I really didn't like it so I dropped it. The main reason was posing people. Also as a budget photographer and splitting the money almost made it not worth it when you added editing time.

I feel fortunate that it forced me to learn, especially flash photography. I was actually afraid of the flash at one time. It did a good job but did not understand why and I was concerned about repeatability. I found Syl Arena and my guru - Neil van Neikerk.

Being a pro photographer is not only about how good you are, it is how quickly you can dig yourself out of trouble because eventually there will be some and you have zero time for anything. Also even if you don't like to use a flash you have to master it. You have to adapt to every lighting situation. Many are self taught and are excellent but it does not hurt to be accredited when starting out. I read horror stories and seen images from self proclaimed natural light photographers until it came time for the wedding reception in a dark venue. If you can manage that no problem but I think most bring out the lighting gear.

So there is a summary of my brief stint as a wedding photographer. I did gain a whole new level of respect for working pros. When I read "why do they charge so much, they just press a button" I want to smack that person on the side of the head.


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MBB89
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Jun 11, 2018 10:56 |  #13

Wedding photography is an extremely challenging, though also very rewarding genre. Very few areas require you to be skilled in such a variety of lighting conditions (outside 2pm sun, dark churches where you can't use flash, candlelit receptions where you can use as much as you want, and literally everything in between) that change so dynamically. This while ALSO managing your own team and sometimes part of the event (so what groups of photos should we take?, pushy Uncle Bobs) during a long and sometimes stressful day with no breaks.

That said, I love my clients and the relationships I have developed. It has made me an infinitely better photographer and challenged me to be a better person as well.

Will I do it forever? I'm not sure. But I will never look back with regret on the time I've spent doing it.




  
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digital ­ paradise
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Jun 11, 2018 11:47 |  #14

MBB89 wrote in post #18643216 (external link)
Wedding photography is an extremely challenging, though also very rewarding genre. Very few areas require you to be skilled in such a variety of lighting conditions (outside 2pm sun, dark churches where you can't use flash, candlelit receptions where you can use as much as you want, and literally everything in between) that change so dynamically. This while ALSO managing your own team and sometimes part of the event (so what groups of photos should we take?, pushy Uncle Bobs) during a long and sometimes stressful day with no breaks.

That said, I love my clients and the relationships I have developed. It has made me an infinitely better photographer and challenged me to be a better person as well.

Will I do it forever? I'm not sure. But I will never look back with regret on the time I've spent doing it.

Yes actually a few members here showed me the nice work they did in churches where flash is not allowed. It's just my opinion if you are going of offer those types of services you need to be able to use all the tools proficiently even if you don't like some of them.


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Jun 11, 2018 11:58 as a reply to  @ digital paradise's post |  #15

That also means your tool suite must also include the digital darkroom side of the equation. If you don't like to process images, or are not adept at it, or don't invest in the proper tools, then your results aren't ever going to be as good as you can make them. Chances are quite good that your WB will be off and you will need to shoot at very high ISOs, so management of noise and correcting of color will be pretty critical steps at some point.


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