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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 21 Jun 2018 (Thursday) 18:24
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Anti-fogging Agents And Their Effects

 
icopus
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Post edited 9 months ago by icopus. (4 edits in all)
     
Jun 21, 2018 18:24 |  #1

I'm sick and tired of fogging and I often don't have the time to acclimate. I mean, by then, the bugs, birds, deer, or whatever is gone.

So, just how much of an effect does anti-fogging agents have on IQ after applying anti-fogging agents to a lens? (That was a difficult question to construct. I hope it makes sense.) I'll be happy with 'decent' photos. A National Geographic hopeful, I am not!

How much of an effect could anti-fogging agents have on the lens itself? The external elements are really glass, right?

Finally, couldn't the anti-fogging agent be removed once no longer needed or desired?

Thanks for your replies.

Should this query be posted to the wrong section, please advise and I'll correct. TY.


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mcoren
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Jun 21, 2018 19:52 |  #2

I don't think anti-fogging agents really prevent fogging, they just keep it from adhering as much to the glass so you can remove it more easily. Think Rain-X on a car windshield or something like that.

Fog forms when the glass surface is cooler than the outside temperature, and humidity in the air condenses onto it. I don't think there's any way to prevent it other than keep the glass warm. In my other expensive optics hobby (astronomy), you're outside at night and temperatures are falling and dew is a real problem. People go to great lengths to prevent it from forming on the optical surfaces, with battery powered heaters and fans. Personally, I've photographed lunar eclipses with a couple of the "hot hands" hand warmer packs taped around the front of my lens to prevent dew from forming.

Hoya makes a line of filters that have some sort of waterproof coating. Again, I don't think this prevents fogging and condensation, but it makes it bead up so it's easier to remove. You might want to try a UV filter from that line to see if it does what you want.

Alternatively, if you have a high quality UV filter, you can try applying an anti-fogging agent to that and see if it gives you the results you want. That's a lot less risky than applying it directly to the lens.

Good luck!
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Jun 21, 2018 20:19 |  #3

Heat is your friend. Dew forms because your glass is colder than the ambient temperature. If your element is warmer than ambient, it will not fog.

Chemical hand warmers (the bags you shake and active) work great.
There are also inexpensive small heat strips that hook to a battery that work great too.

I use heat elements on my optics up to even 10 inches in diameter.

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Jun 21, 2018 20:29 |  #4

I would not attempt any anti-fogging agents on your lenses. Just plan ahead.

While living in Missouri, where the summers can be hot and humid, I placed my camera gear in the vehicle and opened up the bag. As I drove to the location for shooting I left the vehicle AC off and the windows down so the gear would acclimate as I drove.

This is where having two bodies is handy. Now living in Minnesota where the temps swing from one end of the thermometer to the other, in wintertime I would leave one body inside and another outside so you would not have to worry about fogging as you went about working from warm to cold or cold to warm.


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icopus
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Post edited 9 months ago by icopus. (2 edits in all)
     
Jun 21, 2018 20:44 |  #5

Good replies and thank you.

Actually, there are tricks motorcyclists use to keep the inside of a helmet visor from fogging......

Shaving cream among others. (external link) <-- this article is informative and humorous.

Apparently, the silicone in the cream creates a shield and prevents the water buildup. No wiping! Folks have also been using this to prevent their bathroom mirrors from fogging.

Since there doesn't seem to be a commercial product for our lenses, I was wondering if the shaving cream trick would work, cause any excessive IQ problems, and/or cause any long term adverse effects on the glass.

Thx.


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Jun 21, 2018 20:53 |  #6

Stop trying to frak your lens up with anti-fogging / shaving cream BS.


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icopus
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Jun 23, 2018 10:01 |  #7

I've recreated this query to another forum. This thread can be deleted. I tried, but can't. Thank you.


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Jun 23, 2018 10:50 |  #8

I know the OP left the thread. But I can not see any problem with anti-fog spray on your lens. You don't prevent condensation - but you do prevent forming droplets which is the perceived as fog. Anti-fog stuff coats the lens with a film that changes the hydrophobicity of the surface (usually some sort of detergent and alcolol) so that the condensing water stays as a film and not as a droplet. There will be something on the glass, but if you don't care about highest picture quality then why not?


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ed ­ rader
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Jun 23, 2018 14:34 as a reply to  @ drmaxx's post |  #9

i'd use a good UV filter and a rag, and I wouldnt see any drop in IQ.


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Jun 23, 2018 14:36 |  #10

mcoren wrote in post #18649155 (external link)
...

Alternatively, if you have a high quality UV filter, you can try applying an anti-fogging agent to that and see if it gives you the results you want. That's a lot less risky than applying it directly to the lens.

I would agree with this. Lenses already have factory coatings which might react with the chemicals in any anti-fog products.
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Jun 24, 2018 04:32 |  #11

ed rader wrote in post #18650037 (external link)
i'd use a good UV filter and a rag, and I wouldnt see any drop in IQ.

Yep. I have shot through thick dirty zoo glass and most wouldn't notice. Still looked good.


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Jun 24, 2018 04:34 |  #12

I wouldn't put anything on the glass other than an approved cleaner. It's not just the outside of the lens the lens that is effected.


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