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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 14 Jul 2018 (Saturday) 18:22
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Product photography budget setup what should i buy

 
NDAPhoto
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Post edited 7 months ago by NDAPhoto. (2 edits in all)
     
Jul 19, 2018 14:12 |  #16

Because you are starting out on a budget, get this kit on BH Deal Zone today for $499. Add a wireless transmitter and receiver and use the other two in slave mode. Main reason to get this kit is the three strobes are enough output for most table top work and there is no internal fan. It takes the most common Bowens mount for softboxes and modifiers, and replacement bulbs are inexpensive. Spend the rest of your budget on a good boom stand, table, different backgrounds and scrims. You can always add strip boxes or a large octabox later. Those things add up quickly, so save your money here. Adding to your kit is easy, but these strobes will be your basic tools and last for years. No one will ever know you did not use strobes costing two or three times more.

https://www.bhphotovid​eo.com …Plus_Three_Mono​light.html (external link)

Note: I just saw these are 200Ws, not 400Ws, but still a great value.




  
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deebs
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Jul 24, 2018 14:24 |  #17

Thank you to you all for providing me with so much information, i never expected such a response and it has really helped me out a lot. I have ordered the book Light: Science and Magic as suggested, i have also ordered one each of of these stands so i can compare them and then i will order another two of the one i like best https://www.ebay.com …ksid=p2057872.m​2749.l2649 (external link) https://www.ebay.com …ksid=p2057872.m​2749.l2649 (external link)

I have also ordered some ripstop and another diffusion fabric and will work on creating some diy frames for them. I have not yet decided which lighting to go for but i think i would like to go with continuous lighting, i'm located in Los Angeles and it's so hot here right now that it's making me think that i should get a setup that doesn't give off too much heat. I'm ok with buying the lighting used and would welcome any other suggestions about which continuous lighting setup to go for. I have looked at and considered all the lighting options that you have all posted but i'm still unsure on what to go for here ? A big thanks again to you all i never expected such a wealth of knowledge and it is very much appreciated! :)




  
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F2Bthere
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Jul 24, 2018 23:52 |  #18

For continuous lights, I think LEDs put off the least heat compared to power. Strobes put off even less heat relative to power, at least if you leave the modeling lamp off.

It is harder to find good quality LEDs on the used market (they haven't been around as long).


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-Duck-
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Jul 25, 2018 08:29 as a reply to  @ deebs's post |  #19

Continuous lighting is the easiest to use when starting out because you can see the light's effect on the product. You just need to learn to see it the way a camera does, which takes some getting used to. One of the best continuous lights is natural light.

LED's are nice to work with but I find that the better lights, those that are dependable, consistent and effective, are quite pricy. If you want to stay on the cheap (until you learn what you need) get a couple work lights from the hardware store. You can use the rip stop nylon as diffuser (just not to close :) ) and cardboard boxes. Not pretty but serviceable.

Once you start seeing consistent results that you like in your images, that's when you can start evaluating your workflow, seeing what you like and don't like about the lights and then start making educated decisions about them. For me, I personally learned I wanted flash for its power savings, high light output, consistency, flexibility and choice of modifiers. You may find you prefer LEDs and will want to invest in the better units. But you need to start somewhere.

Of course, if you start getting really serious about it you'll soon have a collection of light emitters. Over the years I have acquired shop lights, clamp lights, torches, light stand bulb holders, fluorescent, flash stones, LED's, Christmas lights, and so knows what else. It's all about experimentation and getting the results you want. :D

Best of luck.


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RicoTudor
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Jul 25, 2018 09:09 |  #20

Continuous lighting is great because some fixtures come with a secondary feature that generates instantaneous full-spectrum light at 5500K for the actual exposure. The continuous light merely serves to help with setup for the shot, and can even be turned off entirely! These fixtures are called "strobes".


Canon, Nikon, Contax, Leica, Sony, Profoto.

  
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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Jul 25, 2018 09:25 |  #21

-Duck- wrote in post #18666062 (external link)
Here is a typical setup for many of my product shots. Of course I have acquired more specialized equipment over the years to make my life easier, but it doesn't have to cost a fortune. This table is a prime example. It's my DIY 360 product photography table I designed and assembled from parts sourced from various places. As you can see, all you need is a table, a couple of lights and some stands. Room to work in makes things super comfortable. you don't want to be tiptoeing around clutter because a set can get cluttered enough.
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Hosted photo: posted by -Duck- in
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forum: Flash and Studio Lighting

Oh, man.

I hesitate to even ask, but what is holding your glass table? And why round rather than rectangle?

I designed my own rig that actually works quite well, but it is cobbled together with odd parts and supported by a few c-stands.


PSA: The above post may contain sarcasm, reply at your own risk | Not in gear database: Auto Sears 50mm 2.0 / 3x CL-360, Nikon SB-28, SunPak auto 322 D, Minolta 20

  
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Jul 25, 2018 13:53 |  #22

My guess is that round is easier to turn a-round.


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deebs
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Jul 25, 2018 15:22 |  #23

I have a friend that has some used led lights and i can get them at a very good discount but i'm unsure if they are overkill and more suited to commercial filming ?. This is the light https://www.ebay.com …m570.l1313&LH_T​itleDesc=0 (external link) I have seen one of these running already but have a couple of concerns with them, the light that it emitted appeared to have a redness to it and the second concern is how much they weigh which is around 30lbs! One of my c-stands arrived today and it appears to be very sturdy. I could possibly borrow one of these and try it out to see if my stand can hold it. What do you think guys ?




  
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-Duck-
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Post edited 6 months ago by -Duck-.
     
Jul 25, 2018 15:22 as a reply to  @ Left Handed Brisket's post |  #24

The glass top is a turnstile. It allows me to shoot 360° products on white with ease. This was designed by me using extruded aluminum parts from 8020.net but styled after some commercially available tables.
Thanks for commenting. Glad you like it.


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-Duck-
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Jul 25, 2018 15:35 as a reply to  @ deebs's post |  #25

Dude, that light retails at about $1000 (I believe). Even if he sells that to you at half price, starting out you can get a whole lot more lighting gear than that... new. I believe I mentioned I got a three light kit with stands and modifiers for $400.
Ultimately it's your money. You can waste, err... spend it however you like. Just keep in mind that you are just starting out and have a lot to learn yet. Don't be getting into hock before you know what to look for.

Just my two bits.


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deebs
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Jul 25, 2018 15:49 as a reply to  @ -Duck-'s post |  #26

Thanks again Duck for all your input and thanks for saving me from possibly buying these, what is your opinion of this kit that another poster recommended https://www.bhphotovid​eo.com …Plus_Three_Mono​light.html (external link) I did try to research this kit further but couldn't find anything besides an old youtube video on it which is why i've not yet pulled the trigger!




  
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Post edited 6 months ago by -Duck-.
     
Jul 25, 2018 17:43 |  #27

deebs wrote in post #18670626 (external link)
Thanks again Duck for all your input and thanks for saving me from possibly buying these, what is your opinion of this kit that another poster recommended https://www.bhphotovid​eo.com …Plus_Three_Mono​light.html (external link) I did try to research this kit further but couldn't find anything besides an old youtube video on it which is why i've not yet pulled the trigger!


Before I answer your first question I would like you to think on this; Why are you in the mindset that you need to buy lighting equipment? I'm not saying you shouldn't buy lighting equipment, after all it makes being a photographer that much easier. Without light we can't take pictures. I just get the feeling that you feel you have to go out and buy something professional in order to meet some self imposed goal. I would just rather see you take a step back and work with what you have before potentially wasting money.

Wescott is a great company that makes really good products. Are they better than other companies? I don't think so but I do think they are more expensive than other companies. But then, this is a subjective opinion so take it for the lesson I present here. Let's look at it another way. I just got my driver's license and I want to be a racecar driver. What kind of car should I get? I was thinking about a Ferrari. I would love a Lamborghini but that's a bit out of my price range. Does that sound reasonable? That's how many here will look at your situation. Take a step back and see where you are and then make some plans to get you to the next step, in small manageable steps. Don't try jumping in with both feet without understanding what you are jumping into. That's why I strongly suggest starting off with what you have or can easily get without overspending. This hobby/business is expensive enough without making spontaneous purchases.


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deebs
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Jul 25, 2018 18:59 as a reply to  @ -Duck-'s post |  #28

I don't currently own any lighting equipment, the only lighting i have right now is the camera's own flash. The main reason i wanted to buy lighting equipment is so that i can provide consistent lighting results, for example if i provided photo's for someone and they then needed more at a later date i'd like to be able to produce the same lighting results so that they wouldn't be mismatched, that's the main thing that i was thinking and the reason i thought i shouldn't go too cheap to start with.

I didn't mean to sound that way regarding the professional lighting, i'd actually like to spend as little as possible but at the same time have a setup that is adequate for what i want to do. I've spent a lot of time already looking at various lights and kits and that combined with all the answers and info that i've received on this thread has kind of made me feel more lost on which to go for, it's like an input overload! The only thing i don't want to do is go ahead and pick a setup and then be told it's not what i should have purchased.




  
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Post edited 6 months ago by -Duck-.
     
Jul 25, 2018 19:34 as a reply to  @ deebs's post |  #29

Perfect. Then I will tell you, you are overthinking your situation. Replicating lighting has nothing to do with what equipment you own or use. It's about seeing how the light falls on your subject and then knowing how to get the same results. Don't worry about what you think people will be expecting of you down the road. You're not there yet so give yourself permission to relax a little here. :)

To begin with, you do have lights. I bet I can visit your residence and pull together at least six light sources without trying. One of them, as I mentioned, is free and readily available and that is natural light. That is where you need to start. Find a window where you can set something up next to it and put something small and of interest next to it and spend a few hours photographing it. Photograph it with different looks to the light. Experiment on what you can do (with what you have) to change the quality of light. Here is your chance to think outside the box. Use a white t-shirt to diffuse the light, a white paper plate to reflect the light, how about a small mirror to aim the light, a large section of aluminum foil for a bigger reflector, light coming through a translucent plastic storage container, through a glass of water, through colored cellophane, put a table lamp overhead, put some tracing paper in front of the lamp... Get the idea?

Late on, when a client does come up to you , shows you a photo and says, "can you create something like this? you will be able to confidently and with conviction say, "YES I CAN!", rather than "I don't know if I have the right lights"

Actually, if you look at my setup photo I posted previously you will see a DIY diffuser I made with a piece of foam core (cut squared) and diffuser material (shower curtain) taped with double sided tape used by carpet installers (that stuff is thin and sticky). I made that years ago and it's still in use. I love that thing and I got it really cheap (because I'm pretty stingy with my money :) ). Actually, the most expensive thing in that photo is my shooting table (aside from the camera and laptop, that is). Everything else I've cobbled together over the years as I've needed it.

As a matter of fact, that same setup gave me the image I posted here; POST 18670044


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deebs
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Jul 25, 2018 21:01 as a reply to  @ -Duck-'s post |  #30

I definitely do overthink everything, you are right. I now understand what you are saying, i've been waiting for my lights to get started but it's becoming clearer to me that it shouldn't be my point of focus right now. Alright it's finally sinking in, i will stop trying to run before i can walk. I'm going to hold off and experiment and practice with what i have available right now until i at least have a grasp of the very basics. Thank you very much for all the time and effort you have put into your replies, it is certainly appreciated and you have guided me in the right direction. If i come back in a months time and ask you which lights to get will you then tell me ? Haha only joking. Thanks again. :-D




  
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Product photography budget setup what should i buy
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