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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Macro 
Thread started 18 Jun 2018 (Monday) 15:47
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Spencerphoto
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Oct 01, 2018 04:43 |  #1111

A beautifully-marked Tent Spider which took up residence beside our front door.


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Archibald
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Oct 01, 2018 09:48 |  #1112

Spencerphoto wrote in post #18719749 (external link)
Newly-hatched Lacewing larvae.


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Fascinating. I had to look at this image for quite a while, and I'm still not sure I've figured it out. It looks like a necklace. Quite amazing.

Those lacewings look real hungry.


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Oct 01, 2018 09:52 |  #1113

Spencerphoto wrote in post #18719806 (external link)
A beautifully-marked Tent Spider which took up residence beside our front door.


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Nice sharp pics of that colorful spider.

I've heard great things about that Sigma 150mm.


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Spencerphoto
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Oct 01, 2018 15:53 as a reply to  @ Archibald's post |  #1114

The Lacewing lays its eggs in a circle, each egg attached to a surface by a long, stiff thread which presumably is designed to keep them away from predators. Wander around my garden and you will spot these little clusters all over the place. They seem to prefer hard surfaces, such as garden furniture and, as in this case, under the eaves of houses.

I like how something as fragile and dainty as a Lacewing is first born as a terrifying pair of jaws with tiny legs attached :-)


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Spencerphoto
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Oct 01, 2018 15:55 as a reply to  @ Archibald's post |  #1115

Thanks. I like the Siggy a lot. TBH, I bought it because it was available at a good price, in a long focal length. Macro is just a bit of fun for me, so I didn't want to spend too much, and the longer focal length means I don't have to get too close. As you know, the further away you can get the shot the better, to avoid spooking the subject.


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Archibald
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Oct 01, 2018 16:37 |  #1116

Spencerphoto wrote in post #18720216 (external link)
The Lacewing lays its eggs in a circle, each egg attached to a surface by a long, stiff thread which presumably is designed to keep them away from predators. Wander around my garden and you will spot these little clusters all over the place. They seem to prefer hard surfaces, such as garden furniture and, as in this case, under the eaves of houses.

We have lacewings here too, so I'll have to keep my eyes out for rings like this. This assumes they do the same here as in Oz.

I like how something as fragile and dainty as a Lacewing is first born as a terrifying pair of jaws with tiny legs attached :-)

Right, that's what I thought too.

Lots of surprises in the tiny world of bugs.


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Oct 01, 2018 16:45 |  #1117

Spencerphoto wrote in post #18720217 (external link)
Thanks. I like the Siggy a lot. TBH, I bought it because it was available at a good price, in a long focal length. Macro is just a bit of fun for me, so I didn't want to spend too much, and the longer focal length means I don't have to get too close. As you know, the further away you can get the shot the better, to avoid spooking the subject.

I know a guy who used the Sigma 180mm and loved it. Of course most all macro lenses are sharp, especially since we usually stop down to f/11 for DOF, and that is well into diffraction territory. So perhaps we are limited by diffraction and not by the optical qualities of the glass.

As far as distance is concerned, sometimes you just have to maintain a good distance, as some critters will go under the leaf or fly away. On the other hand, there is a tradeoff with being able to deliver soft on-camera flash. As you get farther away, the light gets harsher, unless you increase the size of the diffuser proportionally, and big diffusers are a disadvantage.


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Spencerphoto
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Oct 01, 2018 16:51 as a reply to  @ Archibald's post |  #1118

"As far as distance is concerned, sometimes you just have to maintain a good distance, as some critters will go under the leaf or fly away. On the other hand, there is a tradeoff with being able to deliver soft on-camera flash. As you get farther away, the light gets harsher, unless you increase the size of the diffuser proportionally, and big diffusers are a disadvantage."

I didn't know that. Cheers! :-)

I bought a Yongnuo macro ring flash to experiment with, on the basis that, if I found it useful, I would buy a decent brand, e.g. Canon. Turned out it works just fine and so I haven't felt the need to invest in a decent one. I need to spend more time using flash however, because even when I play with the L/R ratio, I find the results a bit 'flat'. I am not a fan of flash in any situation (partly because I'm not very good at using them) and much prefer to reproduce, as far as possible, the ambient lighting.


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Oct 01, 2018 22:33 |  #1119

Spencerphoto wrote in post #18720250 (external link)
"As far as distance is concerned, sometimes you just have to maintain a good distance, as some critters will go under the leaf or fly away. On the other hand, there is a tradeoff with being able to deliver soft on-camera flash. As you get farther away, the light gets harsher, unless you increase the size of the diffuser proportionally, and big diffusers are a disadvantage."

I didn't know that. Cheers! :-)

I bought a Yongnuo macro ring flash to experiment with, on the basis that, if I found it useful, I would buy a decent brand, e.g. Canon. Turned out it works just fine and so I haven't felt the need to invest in a decent one. I need to spend more time using flash however, because even when I play with the L/R ratio, I find the results a bit 'flat'. I am not a fan of flash in any situation (partly because I'm not very good at using them) and much prefer to reproduce, as far as possible, the ambient lighting.

If you are interested in lighting for macro subjects, it might be worthwhile for you to read some of the Strobist articles on the web. There are a series of them. To summarize, the lesson is that a soft light has to be big and close to the subject. It needs to look big to the subject, and that is achieved by size and closeness. You can read more here:
http://strobist.blogsp​ot.com …it-21-apparent-light.html (external link)

Now a ring light is a bit different, because it is not a uniform light source as umbrellas and softboxes are. So it has unique lighting properties. It is interesting that you are experimenting with it and we would love to know your results and conclusions.


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Spencerphoto
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Post edited 4 months ago by Spencerphoto. (2 edits in all)
     
Oct 01, 2018 22:51 as a reply to  @ Archibald's post |  #1120

Thanks for the tip. For the kind of 'safari style' shooting I enjoy, daylight and/or the macro flash are pretty much all I can use without scaring the subject away. The principal advantage of the flash, as I see it, is the speed with which it can be deployed (assuming you already have it fitted). I also find that, sometimes at least, a very short burst doesn't scare the subject away, as though they either don't see it or don't recognise it as a threat. Other times, 'poof!' they're outta there!

Of course the species you're shooting also comes into play, with some being far more skittish and/or mobile than others.

I can't find the photo at the moment, but I recall spending a good thirty minutes stalking a lovely little Lynx Spider through a shrub. I had a particular shot in mind but the talentljust wouldn't cooperate. Then, just before my creaky old back gave up, I managed to herd him into place and got him as he re-emerged from behind some leaves.

I love that sort of thing - photography that feels a bit like 'hunting'.

I admire the lengths some people go to in the studio, shooting bugs with very fancy lighting and using focus stacking, but to be frank, I can't be arsed with all that. I don't have the right sort of patience and attention to detail.


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Oct 02, 2018 00:52 |  #1121

Ichneumon wasp, maybe Amblyteles. Taken in August.


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Oct 02, 2018 00:59 |  #1122

A bee sampling some nectar. Calgary, August 2018.


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Spencerphoto
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Oct 02, 2018 05:11 |  #1123

Found it at last. That'll teach me to buy a new pooter.

I had to stalk this little fella for ages to get the shot I wanted. Apparently, the Lynx Spider has quite a painful bite for its size.

Boo!


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Oct 02, 2018 05:18 |  #1124

Spencerphoto wrote in post #18720599 (external link)
Found it at last. That'll teach me to buy a new pooter.

I had to stalk this little fella for ages to get the shot I wanted. Apparently, the Lynx Spider has quite a painful bite for its size.

Boo!

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Nice shot! And good to see another Brisbane macro shooter here! :)



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Oct 02, 2018 06:51 |  #1125

Archibald wrote in post #18717528 (external link)
Leafhopper closeup, taken in Belize last March. Those roundish objects to the side would appear to be its "elbows". The second photo shows the whole bug.

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(I'm cleaning my hard drive and finding some lost treasure.)

Wow that first one is really close.


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