Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 16 Oct 2018 (Tuesday) 22:13
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Continuous light vs flash

 
TeamSpeed
01010100 01010011
Avatar
37,004 posts
Gallery: 111 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 5834
Joined May 2002
Location: Midwest
Post edited over 1 year ago by TeamSpeed. (3 edits in all)
     
Oct 18, 2018 08:38 |  #16

davesrose wrote in post #18731400 (external link)
Simon might have been referring to the Amazon link from the OP. It was one of the $50 kits (3 CFLs with stands and umbrellas). I can attest that those are best to always avoid.

Oh, perhaps. I have used those too, I agree, those are flimsy and break easily too. The inserts fall apart so that you end up with either an unworking bulb, or worse, a potential firehazard. We had one short out on us. Also, the plastic positional locks will eventually fail/crack.

The amazon link I posted are a few steps above that yet, but still not to the caliber of pro gear. However you can use readily available camcorder batteries for portability, you can dial in brightness and color temperature, and they are built out of anodized aluminum housing/bracing. They seem pretty robust and do a great job in concentrating light in a small area.

After going to LED panels, I will never do CFL bulbs ever again.


Past Equipment | My Personal Gallery (external link) My Business Gallery (external link)
For Sale: 2x Teleconverter
For Sale: Sigma USB Dock

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Wilt
Reader's Digest Condensed version of War and Peace [POTN Vol 1]
Avatar
41,787 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 2562
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Belmont, CA
Post edited over 1 year ago by Wilt. (5 edits in all)
     
Oct 18, 2018 18:42 |  #17

[QUOTE=Angmo;18731240]​I use the modeling lamp as needed but use its flash for taking. Only once have I used a modeling lamp for taking the pic.


To be clear, I did not use the modelling light for taking that shot, that was with the flashtube. The constant modelling light simply allowed more rapid precise placement of the light to get the glint specifically where I wanted it in the photo.


You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support https://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
Canon dSLR system, Olympus OM 35mm system, Bronica ETRSi 645 system, Horseman LS 4x5 system, Metz flashes, Dynalite studio lighting, and too many accessories to mention

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
firme
Senior Member
293 posts
Likes: 13
Joined Mar 2012
Location: East Chicago, IN
     
Oct 19, 2018 11:53 |  #18

I use a speedlite for outdoor, still learning myself. I do avoid using it in late afternoons. If one ever does a shoot close to sundown or evening, would it be best to use a low cost led continuous light source to help focus on subject? Of course set up for using the speedlite. I have seen people use a one set up like godox or similar set up. I definitely can't and won't spend that kind of money. Although I have seen some Alienbees for around $150 plus one would have to get some type of battery pack for that light correct?

Do I have this all wrong, if so, is there a better option/set up? I have seen various videos on this topic.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Alveric
Goldmember
Avatar
4,598 posts
Gallery: 38 photos
Likes: 1051
Joined Jan 2011
Location: Canada
     
Oct 19, 2018 12:08 |  #19
bannedPermanent ban

firme wrote in post #18732195 (external link)
[..]If one ever does a shoot close to sundown or evening, would it be best to use a low cost led continuous light source to help focus on subject?

All you need is a flashlight.


'The success of the second-rate is deplorable in itself; but it is more deplorable in that it very often obscures the genuine masterpiece. If the crowd runs after the false, it must neglect the true.' —Arthur Machen
Why 'The Histogram' Sux (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Tom ­ Reichner
"I am a little creepy"
Avatar
13,877 posts
Gallery: 146 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 3987
Joined Dec 2008
Location: Omak, in north-central Washington state, USA
     
Oct 19, 2018 12:13 |  #20

photoguy6405 wrote in post #18730523 (external link)
What are the pros and cons of continuous light vs flash units?

I think that one big advantage to continuous light is that there is no need to worry about synch speed and how to get the camera to override its limitations.

It sucks to have to go into camera menus and make adjustments to settings and stuff every time one wants to use flash. . This is what has kept me from using flash - the camera doesn't just automatically make all of the adjustments by itself, and I don't have the patience (ability to focus and concentrate for 5+ minutes) to read a manual or watch a tutorial. . So the flash units that I paid good money for are just sitting in the boxes they came in, unused.

With continuous light, I wouldn't have to figure out anything technical, and could just frame and shoot the way I do with ambient light. . This means I could focus 100% of my attention on my subjects and not have to worry about stupid technical stuff like settings and menus and so forth.

If only they made a little LED light thingy that you plug into the hot shoe that gave off as much light as a premium flash unit, without needing its own battery - that would be very helpful. . The problem with the light thingies that I bought is that they hardly give off any light at all. . Sheesh! . So disappointing.


.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
TeamSpeed
01010100 01010011
Avatar
37,004 posts
Gallery: 111 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 5834
Joined May 2002
Location: Midwest
Post edited over 1 year ago by TeamSpeed. (2 edits in all)
     
Oct 19, 2018 12:48 |  #21

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18732205 (external link)
I think that one big advantage to continuous light is that there is no need to worry about synch speed and how to get the camera to override its limitations.

It sucks to have to go into camera menus and make adjustments to settings and stuff every time one wants to use flash. . This is what has kept me from using flash - the camera doesn't just automatically make all of the adjustments by itself, and I don't have the patience (ability to focus and concentrate for 5+ minutes) to read a manual or watch a tutorial. . So the flash units that I paid good money for are just sitting in the boxes they came in, unused.

With continuous light, I wouldn't have to figure out anything technical, and could just frame and shoot the way I do with ambient light. . This means I could focus 100% of my attention on my subjects and not have to worry about stupid technical stuff like settings and menus and so forth.

If only they made a little LED light thingy that you plug into the hot shoe that gave off as much light as a premium flash unit, without needing its own battery - that would be very helpful. . The problem with the light thingies that I bought is that they hardly give off any light at all. . Sheesh! . So disappointing.

.

When I use a flash, I set ISO and the sync speed is set to whatever the camera allows for a flash, probably around 1/200th. Then I tell the flash to EC more or less like normal EC. The camera then adjusts the flash output accordingly for what I have it set for. I guess I don't know why one has to keep changing flash settings?

The improved precision of E-TTL II means photographers will spend less time worrying about how their flash will react to aspects of the scene, and whether flash exposure compensation will be required to correct the camera’s false conclusions. This leaves more time to ensure the composition of the picture is perfect and that decisive moments are captured.

https://cpn.canon-europe.com …ion/technical/E​-TTL_II.do (external link)

Not to mention you cannot do some very creative things with continuous lights that you can with flash. If you manage your curtain settings correctly you can do some very nifty effects to create motion despite having a flash stop the motion.

IMAGE: https://photos.smugmug.com/Church-and-Family/The-Kids/i-G5wb5r7/0/aece2c5e/XL/BIG_9404-XL.jpg

Past Equipment | My Personal Gallery (external link) My Business Gallery (external link)
For Sale: 2x Teleconverter
For Sale: Sigma USB Dock

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Angmo
looks like I picked a bad week to give up halucinagens
Avatar
1,098 posts
Gallery: 25 photos
Likes: 898
Joined Dec 2015
Location: AZ-USA
Post edited over 1 year ago by Angmo. (2 edits in all)
     
Oct 19, 2018 13:02 |  #22

I like that I can control ambient light with flash. Overpower the sun type pics.

My avatar - was shot in bright morning sun but the background is darkened for the headshot.

Continuous lights won’t have the power for that. Well unless you want to blind the subject...

Modifier is the lovely Elinchrom Fireball!! - Maxilight.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Nikons, Rolleiflexes, Elinchroms, Billinghams

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
firme
Senior Member
293 posts
Likes: 13
Joined Mar 2012
Location: East Chicago, IN
     
Oct 19, 2018 13:16 |  #23

Flashlight, that is cost effective. Thanks.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Tom ­ Reichner
"I am a little creepy"
Avatar
13,877 posts
Gallery: 146 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 3987
Joined Dec 2008
Location: Omak, in north-central Washington state, USA
     
Oct 19, 2018 14:13 |  #24

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18732224 (external link)
When I use a flash, I set ISO and the sync speed is set to whatever the camera allows for a flash, probably around 1/200th. Then I tell the flash to EC more or less like normal EC. The camera then adjusts the flash output accordingly for what I have it set for. I guess I don't know why one has to keep changing flash settings?

.
I don't know either.

When I got the flash I took it out of the box it came in and inserted it into the hotshoe of my camera. . For whatever reason, when I went to take a picture, the flash didn't go off. . I couldn't understand why, and when I asked somebody about it they said it might be because I was trying to take a picture at a speed that was faster than the synch speed, and that if that was the case I would have to enable HSS (high speed synch).

So I went into the camera menu and looked for High Speed Synch, but didn't see anything like that. . All my menus seem to have are "simple, basic" options such white balance, sleep timer, battery info, sensor cleaning, etc. . I didn't see any menu pages that were about flash or flash settings. . And God forbid, I'm certainly not going to dig deep into menus like the custom functions or anything like that - if a guy like me messes with that complex stuff, there's no telling what he will screw up!

Anyway, the fact remains that I got a new flash, put it on the hotshoe, and it didn't go off. . Which makes me fear that just to get it to fire I would have to find flash settings and make some kind of adjustments to them. . Sheesh - I just want it to fire off when I press the shutter button!

This shouldn't be rocket science. . In the old days I bought a blister pack of flashes and put them on the camera and they fired off when I pressed the button. . That's how it should work now. . Sheesh! . I am frustrated and confused.

With continuous light I wouldn't have to worry about ANY of this crap. . And that, I believe, is the real beauty of continuous light - it keeps the photographer from having to figure anything new out.


.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
TeamSpeed
01010100 01010011
Avatar
37,004 posts
Gallery: 111 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 5834
Joined May 2002
Location: Midwest
     
Oct 19, 2018 14:25 as a reply to  @ Tom Reichner's post |  #25

Just as long as you know that you are handicapped with continuous lighting.... There are just things you can't do with that type of lighting.

There is indeed a menu option to enable and configure ettl flashes. One of the many red menus I believe.


Past Equipment | My Personal Gallery (external link) My Business Gallery (external link)
For Sale: 2x Teleconverter
For Sale: Sigma USB Dock

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
inkista
Senior Member
Avatar
640 posts
Likes: 77
Joined Oct 2007
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Post edited over 1 year ago by inkista. (2 edits in all)
     
Oct 19, 2018 15:29 |  #26

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18732281 (external link)
When I got the flash I took it out of the box it came in and inserted it into the hotshoe of my camera. For whatever reason, when I went to take a picture, the flash didn't go off. I couldn't understand why, and when I asked somebody about it they said it might be because I was trying to take a picture at a speed that was faster than the synch speed, and that if that was the case I would have to enable HSS (high speed synch).

I can actually think of a bunch of other reasons: batteries in the wrong way, dead or bad battery, flash mounted backwards on the camera hotshoe, dirt on the flash foot pins or camera hotshoe contacts preventing contact, flash turned off, camera set to disable flash, hotshoe micro-switch jammed so the camera thinks you're using the pop-up flash, etc. etc. Not doing HSS usually just means you get black/dark bars at the top and/or bottom of the frame, not that the flash doesn't fire. If you're shooting a mirrorless camera, then silent/electronic shutter's another common culprit.

My experience is the exact opposite of yours. I screwed that 580EX onto my little XT, and bam, I was off and running to the races. But I did a lot of reading up about using flash first.

So I went into the camera menu and looked for High Speed Synch, but didn't see anything like that. All my menus seem to have are "simple, basic" options such white balance, sleep timer, battery info, sensor cleaning, etc. I didn't see any menu pages that were about flash or flash settings. And God forbid, I'm certainly not going to dig deep into menus like the custom functions or anything like that - if a guy like me messes with that complex stuff, there's no telling what he will screw up!

Which camera and flash are we talking about? Pre-Digic 4 Canon bodies don't actually have a flash camera menu. And you can set HSS on the flash.

Anyway, the fact remains that I got a new flash, put it on the hotshoe, and it didn't go off. Which makes me fear that just to get it to fire I would have to find flash settings and make some kind of adjustments to them. Sheesh - I just want it to fire off when I press the shutter button!

Well, that is the way it's supposed to work if you use eTTL (automated power setting of the flash mode).

Things to check:

  • That all your batteries in everything are good.
  • That all the pins on the foot of the flash are making contacts with the pads on the hotshoe (i.e., is seated full forward into the shoe, isn't backwards, doesn't have dirt/tape/whatever stopping the contact on either the pins or the pads, etc.)
  • That your flash isn't set to an optical or radio slave mode which tells it to stop listening to the pins on the foot and listen to the radio receiver or optical sensor instead.

I would say, first, with the flash in your hand, and off the camera, that you test the flash with the TEST button to see if it's the flash or the camera that's the problem. If the TEST button doesn't work, then check the batteries.

This shouldn't be rocket science.

It isn't. I can do it. :D I'm not a rocket scientist.

I am frustrated and confused.

Well, we're willing to help out with advice and to break it all down. Granted, this is free advice on an internet messageboard. But we're really pretty good at this. And you can also go find folks like Neil van Niekerk (external link) and David Hobby (external link) who are great at explaining how to use a flash. But you are going to have to put in some effort. We can't fix things by telepathy.

With continuous light I wouldn't have to worry about ANY of this crap. . And that, I believe, is the real beauty of continuous light - it keeps the photographer from having to figure anything new out.

OTOH, learning something new keeps your brain active (I'm getting older. This is important as my brain gets more and more teflon-coated and nothing sticks.) And you simply can't do things with continuous lights you can do with flash. Also, it's way fun to haul a battery-powered light out onto location. My BIL once said, "Hey, let's go to the beach for the sunset!" and I threw a speedlight one-light Strobist setup into a bag, and we were doing a lit shoot with my nephew at the beach 20 minutes later. Not seeing the continuous AC-powered CLF cheapie setup working for that. Batteries can be far more convenient than power cords.

Flash also gives you a ton more light and power to work with than continuous lights do, for a lot less money. And how much light you have to work with on your lighting gear is very similar to how much maximum aperture you have to work with on your lenses: the more you have, the more you can do, but the bigger and more expensive the gear gets. And the effects you can get with light often depend on lighting different areas of your scene (say, subject vs. background) at different levels. And the more levels you have, the more effects you can do, all the way from a black silhouetted subject against a background to a lit subject with a black background. Continuous typically won't let you get a whole lot brighter than the ambient light without a lot of heat or a lot of money. Flash lets you do it very easily. Even with an el-cheapo $65 no-name Chinese bit of gear.


I'm a woman. I shoot with a Fuji X100T, Panasonic GX-7, Canon 5DmkII, and 50D. flickr stream (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Wilt
Reader's Digest Condensed version of War and Peace [POTN Vol 1]
Avatar
41,787 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 2562
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Belmont, CA
Post edited over 1 year ago by Wilt.
     
Oct 19, 2018 22:50 |  #27

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18732281 (external link)
.
I don't know either.

When I got the flash I took it out of the box it came in and inserted it into the hotshoe of my camera. . For whatever reason, when I went to take a picture, the flash didn't go off. . I couldn't understand why, and when I asked somebody about it they said it might be because I was trying to take a picture at a speed that was faster than the synch speed, and that if that was the case I would have to enable HSS (high speed synch).

So I went into the camera menu and looked for High Speed Synch, but didn't see anything like that. . All my menus seem to have are "simple, basic" options such white balance, sleep timer, battery info, sensor cleaning, etc. . I didn't see any menu pages that were about flash or flash settings. . And God forbid, I'm certainly not going to dig deep into menus like the custom functions or anything like that - if a guy like me messes with that complex stuff, there's no telling what he will screw up!

Anyway, the fact remains that I got a new flash, put it on the hotshoe, and it didn't go off. . Which makes me fear that just to get it to fire I would have to find flash settings and make some kind of adjustments to them. . Sheesh - I just want it to fire off when I press the shutter button!

This shouldn't be rocket science. . In the old days I bought a blister pack of flashes and put them on the camera and they fired off when I pressed the button. . That's how it should work now. . Sheesh! . I am frustrated and confused.

With continuous light I wouldn't have to worry about ANY of this crap. . And that, I believe, is the real beauty of continuous light - it keeps the photographer from having to figure anything new out.

.

On a Canon dSLR, the 'basics' are simple -- if you avoid what I will call 'newfangled complications'...

  • Put the camera in AV mode, set the aperture on the lens, turn on eTTL flash and turn off the brain mostly.
  • Or put the camera in P mde, and turn on the eTTL flash, and turn off the brain entirely.



It only becomes more complex if you put the camera into TV and you

  • select shutter speed faster than X-synch and you do not have HSS enabled in the flash unit
  • If you have HSS enabled in the flash unit, you can once again turn off the brain mostly

You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support https://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
Canon dSLR system, Olympus OM 35mm system, Bronica ETRSi 645 system, Horseman LS 4x5 system, Metz flashes, Dynalite studio lighting, and too many accessories to mention

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bobbyz
Cream of the Crop
19,434 posts
Likes: 1614
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Bay Area, CA
     
Oct 20, 2018 21:10 |  #28

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18732205 (external link)
I think that one big advantage to continuous light is that there is no need to worry about synch speed and how to get the camera to override its limitations.

It sucks to have to go into camera menus and make adjustments to settings and stuff every time one wants to use flash. . This is what has kept me from using flash - the camera doesn't just automatically make all of the adjustments by itself, and I don't have the patience (ability to focus and concentrate for 5+ minutes) to read a manual or watch a tutorial. . So the flash units that I paid good money for are just sitting in the boxes they came in, unused.

I don't think I ever needed to change anything on my camera menu to use flash. I mainly use studio strobes, indoors in the studio as well as outdoors. Only thing I need to change on my camera is preview ON or off when using strobe inside darker studio. This is more of a mirrrorless thing and on my Fuji I have setup a dedicated button. Used to be AlienBees/Einstein with full manual but new Godox allow TTL, just like Profoto.


5dmk3, 35L, 85L II, 300mm f2.8 IS I, 400mm f5.6
Fuji XT-1, 14mm f2.8, 23mm f1.4, 35mm f1.4, 56mm f1.2, 90mm f2, 50-140mm f2.8

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jlafferty
Senior Member
259 posts
Likes: 94
Joined Feb 2017
Location: NYC
Post edited over 1 year ago by jlafferty.
     
Oct 21, 2018 13:04 |  #29

inkista wrote in post #18732328 (external link)
I'm not a rocket scientist.

https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=THNPmhBl-8I (external link) :D

I think strobe is for sure tricky to envision when you start out, and watching other people use them can be a huge leg up. Watch videos. Go to workshops hosted by reputable people. It will click eventually.

The reality with hotlights, at least for stills, we're just not there yet. LEDs just can't push out enough power. I even have some 1300 lumen / 43000 Lux flashlights that are seriously bright but - unless you're shooting till life / tabletop - they just barely begin to scratch the output needs. And anything that does approach output needs is seriously expensive and, my bet, will be outdated very quickly - LED tech is moving very fast.

Stepping away from LED and going with more affordable hot lights, unless you've got the money and infrastructure to lay the wiring for 4k and 6k ballasts you're going to work with 2k and under tungsten/HMI sources. You will need two, but benefit by having more. They're not too expensive (eBay), but they are bulky and seriously hard to transport. And at that you'll be working at ISO 800-1000, shutter speed of maybe 1/160th.

Now, I like hot lights, I have a mix of 750w to 1k hot lights in my studio. They're capable of making beautiful images and I enjoy using them. And I can make the case that they're necessary for certain styles of photos and are compelling as a result. But for most people and most use case scenarios they're really impractical, and way underpowered.


Current Portfolio (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
RDKirk
Adorama says I'm "packed."
Avatar
13,098 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 616
Joined May 2004
Location: USA
     
Oct 21, 2018 13:41 |  #30

Wilt wrote in post #18732565 (external link)
On a Canon dSLR, the 'basics' are simple -- if you avoid what I will call 'newfangled complications'...

  • Put the camera in AV mode, set the aperture on the lens, turn on eTTL flash and turn off the brain mostly.
  • Or put the camera in P mde, and turn on the eTTL flash, and turn off the brain entirely.


It only becomes more complex if you put the camera into TV and you

  • select shutter speed faster than X-synch and you do not have HSS enabled in the flash unit
  • If you have HSS enabled in the flash unit, you can once again turn off the brain mostly

I guess he was actually talking about speedlights.

I don't give any of that stuff any consideration with my studio electronic flash. Much more simple.


TANSTAAFL--The Only Unbreakable Rule in Photography

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

6,397 views & 11 likes for this thread
Continuous light vs flash
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is dayuan99
1359 guests, 293 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.