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Thread started 09 Dec 2018 (Sunday) 08:23
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Buy Used FF or Not for Wedding

 
soeren
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Dec 17, 2018 14:29 |  #61

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18772510 (external link)
How does one hone their skills for a one time event shooting a wedding as a gift to the person because there are no funds for a wedding photographer? I also wouldn't want to assume that skills need to be honed. If one needs to gain 1.5 to 2 stops better ISO performance, contrast, metering, etc with wider views as one might want for a wedding for this one situation, then a better camera fits the bill IMO.

If the skills of the person is constant, as is the scene at hand, then fast lenses and/or a better body will make for better results. A rental won't cost much and assuming that skills aren't going to magically improve dramatically in two weeks, a better tool will make for better results. If the wedding was 6 months out, then yes, I could see going out and trying one's hand at shooting such an event in low light, poor light, or tight quarters being beneficial. It provides time to learn lighting, post processing, and different lenses for different effects, but alas, there are only 2 weeks with 2 major holidays in the mix right before the wedding.

For many people weddings are not something you attend to that often. That said trying to predict which situations you might find yourself in and what is challenging e.g light, focussing, standpoint and angles of view where the wedding takes place. Train Changing lenses if deemed necesary, find the optimal settings and how to change them if necesary, where when and how to use flash. In other words prepare yourself for the upcomming event instead og staring blind on gear that light come in handy if..... That wont do you s..t if youre not prepared and not certain what to do.


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Archibald
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Dec 17, 2018 14:35 |  #62

soeren wrote in post #18772718 (external link)
For many people weddings are not something you attend to that often. That said trying to predict which situations you might find yourself in and what is challenging e.g light, focussing, standpoint and angles of view where the wedding takes place. Train Changing lenses if deemed necesary, find the optimal settings and how to change them if necesary, where when and how to use flash. In other words prepare yourself for the upcomming event instead og staring blind on gear that light come in handy if..... That wont do you s..t if youre not prepared and not certain what to do.

Yep, agreed. Put effort in figuring out the situation, and don't waste time figuring out new gear.

Unless you see the wedding as an excuse to buy some fancy new gear, of course! :mrgreen:


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Dec 17, 2018 15:31 |  #63

I shot a wedding a few months ago...first one in, oh....35 years(?). And back then I was a rank amateur shooting a Minolta SRT201. It worked, professional quality...hot hardly, but I never had a complaint. For this recent wedding I pleaded with the bride to pick someone else to photograph it...she had seen other photography that I had done for church functions and she liked it. I also think she thought I would do it for "cheap" which I did...and will never do again being as OCD or whatever I am about things.<grin>

I shot with a Canon 6D and a Tamron 28-75 2.8. Only 3-4 shots with a speedlight, all else was available light. It worked. The high-ISO capabilities of the 6D is something to be considered...that capability is a big part of what convinced me to buy my 6D.

As for the ceremony in a courtroom. I'm figuring...no windows? Maybe get some pale green gel filter for the speedlight to offset the fluorescent lights? Tungsten?...some pale gold? I dunno, I'm not really experienced much with flash or gels. A Flashbender might come in handy. A color checker card might save some time in PP.

Reception...probably more natural light to work with if it's during the daytime. If you have a lightstand and shoot-thru umbrella maybe set it up for some semi-formal shots during the reception. If nothing else a wedding portrait. A two-light setup...using a speedlight and natural light (window?). Meter for am ambient exposure a stop or two underexposed for (natural light fill) and use the speedlight for your primary light.

What your backgrounds...that perfect shot of the bride and groom kissing won't be so perfect if Chief Justice Fry'em Smith's portrait is growing out of the brides head.

Keep your shutter speed up if shooting available light...raise the ISO if need be. Rather a bit of grain than blurred. Shoot lots of shots.

Etc., etc.,. You'll do fine. Just take pictures like you normally do. The fact that this is a once in a lifetime event for this couple shouldn't enter the equation at all for you. :p

Just thinking out loud. My advice is normally worth exactly what is paid for it. ;-)a


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Dec 17, 2018 15:50 |  #64

There is virtually no learning curve to using a different Canon camera, manual works just the same as the 70d, and actually auto ISO actually works on newer cameras making things even easier. So $75 could very easily make the images better and easier to nail out of camera.


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Dec 17, 2018 16:09 |  #65

So far nobody has talked about the issues of fluorescent lighting or mixed lighting sources. I have nothing but headaches from this when doing casual family photography. I get people with bright orange hair (from overhead lights) when skin tones are near-normal (partial window light). Is this not an issue when doing available light weddings? (I haven't done weddings in a long time, so have no recent experience.)

It's been said - use on-camera flash to get the shot. It's not the most flattering light, but it is the most dependable.


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Dec 17, 2018 16:26 |  #66

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18772778 (external link)
There is virtually no learning curve to using a different Canon camera, manual works just the same as the 70d, and actually auto ISO actually works on newer cameras making things even easier. So $75 could very easily make the images better and easier to nail out of camera.


I beg to differ on that opinion. Setting mode, aperture, and shutter speed and even a lot of top-deck options are the same, but it is a whole new learning curve to turn on/off features which did not exist in prior models, or new capabilites for setting preferred modes of operations (such as number of AF points, which zones active, etc) Using the 7DII required a lot of reading on settings, which I never had to worry about in the 40D, for example.


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Dec 17, 2018 16:38 |  #67

Wilt wrote in post #18772797 (external link)
I beg to differ on that opinion. Setting mode, aperture, and shutter speed and even a lot of top-deck options are the same, but it is a whole new learning curve to turn on/off features which did not exist in prior models, or new capabilites for setting preferred modes of operations (such as number of AF points, which zones active, etc) Using the 7DII required a lot of reading on settings, which I never had to worry about in the 40D, for example.

Beg to differ back, nobody cares about zone af, etc for a wedding. One would use single point AF or assist AF. Not very hard at all. Nobody mentioned the 7D2 though, a FF would yield better ISO performance and detail rendering. If I had a 70D and had the option to use a newer FF like the 5D4, I know which would be better for the event. It should be interested to see what the TS decides ultimately what to do at the event.


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Dec 17, 2018 16:38 |  #68

Archibald wrote in post #18772786 (external link)
So far nobody has talked about the issues of fluorescent lighting or mixed lighting sources. I have nothing but headaches from this when doing casual family photography. I get people with bright orange hair (from overhead lights) when skin tones are near-normal (partial window light). Is this not an issue when doing available light weddings? (I haven't done weddings in a long time, so have no recent experience.)

It's been said - use on-camera flash to get the shot. It's not the most flattering light, but it is the most dependable.

Flicker control in the newer cameras is very handy, as is the new AWB mode, but I would always set a custom WB anyways in each new scene for a wedding just to be safe. It can be re-edited in the raw later if it is off.


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Dec 17, 2018 18:12 |  #69

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18772804 (external link)
Flicker control in the newer cameras is very handy, as is the new AWB mode, but I would always set a custom WB anyways in each new scene for a wedding just to be safe. It can be re-edited in the raw later if it is off.

I was referring to mixed light sources and poor color rendition under artificial lights. Is this not a problem when shooting weddings under available light?

Here's an example of what I have seen with mixed light sources. This was exposed with bounce flash, but an artificial light source was nearby. Note the color of the top of the hair. I get similar results when shooting with available light from windows when there is also artificial light around.


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Dec 17, 2018 18:46 |  #70

I prepared on how to mange flash for 6 months before my first wedding. Mixed lighting is the toughest but if someone takes that on you need to know it. Gelling is part of it and incandescent is pretty easy. Flourecent used to be but now the temps can be different. Some places replace old tubes with new ones that are different so even tougher. Unless you can measure it and apply the correct gel you are guessing. Add natural light even tougher.

I think if you get a second camera by the same manufacturer it does not take much to roll with it. You have to know your gear but what is most importantly is you have to get out of trouble if something goes wrong - quickly. You don’t have time to open the manual.


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Dec 17, 2018 19:03 |  #71

Has anyone noticed that FrozenFrame started a separate thread and has not returned to this one?


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Dec 17, 2018 19:09 as a reply to  @ chuckmiller's post |  #72

LOL.


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Dec 17, 2018 22:40 |  #73

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18772778 (external link)
There is virtually no learning curve to using a different Canon camera, manual works just the same as the 70d, and actually auto ISO actually works on newer cameras making things even easier. So $75 could very easily make the images better and easier to nail out of camera.

I've just always shot on manual...nothing auto. So the auto-ISO for the 6D works good? I think the next time I get a chance to shoot I'll give it a try. Thanks for mentioning it!!!


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Intheswamp
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Dec 17, 2018 22:47 |  #74

chuckmiller wrote in post #18772868 (external link)
Has anyone noticed that FrozenFrame started a separate thread and has not returned to this one?

But, it's still a pretty good talk!!!! :lol:


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Intheswamp
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Dec 17, 2018 22:51 |  #75

digital paradise wrote in post #18772863 (external link)
I prepared on how to mange flash for 6 months before my first wedding. Mixed lighting is the toughest but if someone takes that on you need to know it. Gelling is part of it and incandescent is pretty easy. Flourecent used to be but now the temps can be different. Some places replace old tubes with new ones that are different so even tougher. Unless you can measure it and apply the correct gel you are guessing. Add natural light even tougher.

I think if you get a second camera by the same manufacturer it does not take much to roll with it. You have to know your gear but what is most importantly is you have to get out of trouble if something goes wrong - quickly. You don’t have time to open the manual.

Interesting, that you mentioned the combination of lighting. Sunday night I'll be shooting a children's Christmas play...a small church. There will be a combination of LED and CFL ceiling lights and a couple of small tungsten spotlights. :-)


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