Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 09 Jan 2019 (Wednesday) 08:28
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Lens Tips Please - 100-400

 
Chris ­ L ­ F
Member
217 posts
Likes: 462
Joined Jan 2013
Location: Warwick, England
     
Jan 09, 2019 08:28 |  #1

Having been a little disappointed with some of my bird pictures; not having enough reach sometimes and having to crop too much with a resultant loss of quality, I finally got around to buying an EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II.

I knew it was going to be bigger and heavier than my EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM but was still a little surprised at the increase and don’t laugh but I’m a little apprehensive of it at the moment! I’ve now read the instruction manual but haven’t tried it on the camera yet due to work.

Anyway, I’d appreciate if you could give me advice and tips with regard to this type of lens e.g. how you carry the camera and lens – I assume by the lens and not by the camera strap? Do you use a mono-pod sometimes? Anything really that is useful and will allow me to get the best out of the lens and to look after it.
I’m a fairly experienced photographer but this is a whole different ball game for me and my first L lens.

Thanks, Chris


http://www.flickr.com/​photos/hinkleigh/ (external link)
EOS 650D + 4 lenses + Speedlite 600EX-RT G1X Mark II G16 SX210 IS Pixma Pro-100S

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
saea501
... spilled over a little on the panties
Avatar
6,549 posts
Gallery: 42 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 7701
Joined Jan 2010
Location: Florida
Post edited 10 days ago by saea501.
     
Jan 09, 2019 09:17 |  #2

I use the 100-400 II for birding.

I carry it from the lens ring, no tripod or mono pod. I don't find it to be heavy to the point that it's a problem. In fact, i like the heft of it on the camera. I get some great results with it.

Pretty much all of what you already know. Go out and shoot with it. I'm pretty sure you'll realize what those of us that use it already know. It's quite a piece of work. Image quality is very impressive.


Remember what the DorMouse said.....feed your head.
Bob
https://www.flickr.com …282@N06/with/38​203470844/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Airedale1
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
5,854 posts
Gallery: 23 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 198
Joined Jan 2005
Location: Laconia, NH USA
     
Jan 09, 2019 09:32 |  #3

Although it does not have IS; I would highly recommend that you get yourself a Canon EF 400 f/5.6L prime. To me this has always been one of Canon's best lenses and at $1,149.00 an incredible bargain. Also, IMO at 400mm it is sharper than the 100-400 at 400mm. Add to that the fact that it only weighs 2.75 lbs. and has an excellent built in retractable hood and you will have yourself an excellent birding lens. At only 2.75 lbs. it is excellent for shooting handheld BIF shots.


Canon S90

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Airedale1
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
5,854 posts
Gallery: 23 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 198
Joined Jan 2005
Location: Laconia, NH USA
     
Jan 09, 2019 09:35 |  #4

Taken handheld with 7D2 and EF 400 f/5.6L

IMAGE: https://i.imgur.com/fQrvlHI.jpg

Canon S90

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bbqkid8
Member
Avatar
220 posts
Gallery: 40 photos
Likes: 434
Joined Jul 2008
Location: Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
     
Jan 09, 2019 09:45 |  #5

Chris L F wrote in post #18787803 (external link)
Having been a little disappointed with some of my bird pictures; not having enough reach sometimes and having to crop too much with a resultant loss of quality, I finally got around to buying an EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II.

I knew it was going to be bigger and heavier than my EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM but was still a little surprised at the increase and don’t laugh but I’m a little apprehensive of it at the moment! I’ve now read the instruction manual but haven’t tried it on the camera yet due to work.

Anyway, I’d appreciate if you could give me advice and tips with regard to this type of lens e.g. how you carry the camera and lens – I assume by the lens and not by the camera strap? Do you use a mono-pod sometimes? Anything really that is useful and will allow me to get the best out of the lens and to look after it.
I’m a fairly experienced photographer but this is a whole different ball game for me and my first L lens.

Thanks, Chris

I don't usually use a monopod or a tripod, even though I own them. The main reason for me picking up this lens was to be able to hand-hold a lens while birding. I like to do the hiking method when searching for birds/wildlife and wanted to minimize having to take out the tripod all the time.

I'd say play around and learn the different IS modes. Don't be afraid to lower the shutter speed (at least for bird portraits) since the IS has 4 stops IS! In terms of carrying it around, I have a quick strap and the camera/lens is usually at my hip with my hand holding the lens collar/foot as I walk.

Lately I've been taking more pictures with the 1.4x III attached when the light is out and I've been getting some pretty satisfying results with my EOS R.


Brian,
Canon EOS R; Canon 100-400mm f/4-5.6 Mark II; Canon 70-200mm 2.8 Mark II; Canon 24-70 f/2.8 II; Canon 1.4x Extender III;
https://www.brianbaqui​al.com (external link)
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/bbaquial (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Chris ­ L ­ F
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
217 posts
Likes: 462
Joined Jan 2013
Location: Warwick, England
     
Jan 09, 2019 11:41 |  #6

Thank you for the responses, much appreciated. As you say I need to get out and start using it - I'll probably wonder why I was making a fuss about it then! But it's like many things that are new and you have no experience of.

There was a strap in the box but no mention of it in the instructions I downloaded. Can't imagine it being used for carrying the lens as it's quite thin?

Chris


http://www.flickr.com/​photos/hinkleigh/ (external link)
EOS 650D + 4 lenses + Speedlite 600EX-RT G1X Mark II G16 SX210 IS Pixma Pro-100S

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
pcs
I suddenly feel very old
Avatar
1,000 posts
Gallery: 758 photos
Likes: 8266
Joined Apr 2010
Location: The Netherlands
     
Jan 09, 2019 12:16 |  #7

Airedale1 wrote in post #18787832 (external link)
Although it does not have IS; I would highly recommend that you get yourself a Canon EF 400 f/5.6L prime. To me this has always been one of Canon's best lenses and at $1,149.00 an incredible bargain. Also, IMO at 400mm it is sharper than the 100-400 at 400mm. Add to that the fact that it only weighs 2.75 lbs. and has an excellent built in retractable hood and you will have yourself an excellent birding lens. At only 2.75 lbs. it is excellent for shooting handheld BIF shots.

I'm not sure that's still true for the 100-400II, it used to be for the version I. But as the OP already has the 100-400II I'd say just use it, it's just another lens(albeit a very good one). When on a walk I use a black rapid strap screwed in the lens-foot, in a hide often a mono-pod, around the house just bare. The lens-foot I changed for this one with Arca-Swiss compatible plate:
https://www.amazon.com …s-Interface/dp/B01G8G4YR​O (external link)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
nqjudo
Goldmember
Avatar
3,132 posts
Likes: 1012
Joined Apr 2007
Post edited 14 days ago by nqjudo with reason 'Spelling.'. (2 edits in all)
     
Jan 09, 2019 12:28 |  #8

Chris L F wrote in post #18787917 (external link)
Thank you for the responses, much appreciated. As you say I need to get out and start using it - I'll probably wonder why I was making a fuss about it then! But it's like many things that are new and you have no experience of.

There was a strap in the box but no mention of it in the instructions I downloaded. Can't imagine it being used for carrying the lens as it's quite thin?

Chris

Chris - I can't tell you how much distance I've put in with the 100-400 but I found it light enough to be carried with a system like the Peak Design strap that uses anchors on the camera's strap loops or a BlackRapid type strap that uses the tripod foot. I find the BlackRapid style carry more convenient but you'll get more friction wear on the lens. The Peak Design Slide strap is nice because it is wide and distributes the weight over a pretty large area. It is also very easy to swing the camera up into position. As for the rest the IS is fantastic on this lens and you'll likely be surprised just how low of a shutter speed you can use on static subjects. The only time I use a monopod is when I know I'm going to have a long wait waiting for something to happen and I need to keep the camera up in position. I think this is something you can better evaluate in time with your own personal use. Best of luck with it.


No photographer is as good as the simplest camera. - Edward Steichen.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Snydremark
my very own Lightrules moment
18,343 posts
Gallery: 44 photos
Likes: 1379
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Issaquah, WA USA
     
Jan 09, 2019 12:49 |  #9

The most important piece is proper holding technique and trying to keep your shutter speed up. Between the MkI and MkII, I’ve used versions of this lens for nearly 10 years. I carry it by hand, strap or Capture Clip on my backpacks; it isn’t much added weight unless you’re already compromised (arthritis, etc).

Support the lens just at or just in front of the lens mount; rotate the tripod foot up to get it out of the way. This will have you holding close to the balance point for lens/body and make maneuvering the whole thing easier. It also makes reaching the zoom/tension rings simpler.

Overall, it’s one of the best all-around lenses you ciuld have picked up. Get out and enjoy. What body are you pairing it with?


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Tom ­ Reichner
"I am a little creepy"
Avatar
12,736 posts
Gallery: 142 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 3272
Joined Dec 2008
Location: Omak, in north-central Washington state, USA
     
Jan 09, 2019 16:03 |  #10

.

Chris L F wrote in post #18787803 (external link)
I'd appreciate if you could give me advice and tips with regard to this type of lens e.g. how you carry the camera and lens – I assume by the lens and not by the camera strap?

I carry it a couple of ways -

. . - just let the camera and lens dangle from my neck via the camera strap ... a lot of people don't like this but for me it works better to have the entire weight hang from my neck than it does having it hang from my shoulder. Necks are stronger than shoulders, so that makes sense.

. . - walk around with it cradled in the crook of my arm .... similar to the way a running back holds a football when he is running with it.

Come to think of it, I just pick the darn thing up and carry it without thinking about how to carry it. . The human body automatically carries stuff in the way that's most comfortable. . There's no need to plan and strategize about how to carry something that's only a few pounds. . Don't overthink.

.

Airedale1 wrote in post #18787832 (external link)
Although it does not have IS; I would highly recommend that you get yourself a Canon EF 400 f/5.6L prime. To me this has always been one of Canon's best lenses and at $1,149.00 an incredible bargain. Also, IMO at 400mm it is sharper than the 100-400 at 400mm. Add to that the fact that it only weighs 2.75 lbs. and has an excellent built in retractable hood and you will have yourself an excellent birding lens. At only 2.75 lbs. it is excellent for shooting handheld BIF shots.

As an owner and user of both the 400 mf5.6 and the 100-400 v2, I wholeheartedly disagree with this recommendation.

The 100-400 is better at everything than the 400 f5.6 . . It isn't lighter, but it is better.

The statement that the prime is sharper at 400mm than the zoom is simply incorrect. . In fact, I wonder if Airedale1 confusing the 100-400 v1 with the 100-40 v2. . The v2 is sharper than the prime at 400mm. . And it focuses faster, too.

.

Chris L F wrote in post #18787803 (external link)
Do you use a mono-pod sometimes?

bbqkid8 wrote in post #18787837 (external link)
I don't usually use a monopod or a tripod, even though I own them. The main reason for me picking up this lens was to be able to hand-hold a lens while birding.

With the 100-400mm, I hardly ever use a tripod or monopod. . I use a tripod with big lenses, but the main reason for having a smaller shorter lens like the 100-400mm is to be able to maneuver and get into position rapidly. . That's the main advantage of this lens ... so why negate that advantage by encumbering it with a tripod or monopod?

.

Chris L F wrote in post #18787803 (external link)
I’m a little apprehensive of it at the moment!

I’m a fairly experienced photographer but this is a whole different ball game for me and my first L lens.

Chill out. . It's just a lens. . You use it the same way that you use any of your other lenses. . No biggie. . It functions the same way all the other Canon zoom lenses function. . There really isn't anything unique or special to learn. . Just get out and shoot with it a lot and all of your apprehensions and questions will just kind of answer themselves.

............... ............... ............... ............... ............... ............... ............... ...............

The IS is really good and you can handhold at much slower shutter speeds than most people realize and still get tack-sharp images. . I took this picture of a buck (below) at 1/25 of a second, handheld with no support and nothing to lean against. . Just freehand. . 1/25th certainly isn't ideal, but it is doable without any support.

The IS really is that good and there's no need to keep your shutter speed up with this lens, even at 400mm in low light.

HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.
Photo from Tom Reichner's gallery.



.

"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Spencerphoto
Senior Member
294 posts
Gallery: 39 photos
Likes: 773
Joined Sep 2018
Location: Brisbane
Post edited 14 days ago by Spencerphoto. (2 edits in all)
     
Jan 09, 2019 16:16 |  #11

I would ALWAYS attach the strap to the lens, not the camera, when using any of the heavy L series lenses.

I normally dispense with a monopod or tripod because the subjects I photograph most often with this lens - motorsports and wildlife - require that I am able to swing around to wherever the action might be and I usually have to reframe really quickly. A monopod makes reframing on the vertical axis a bit tricky, for me at least. As others have said, the IS on this lens is superb, so hand-held shooting is perfectly doable, even for those with the age-shakes like me.

I do however find the weight of this lens, and my 70-200 f/2.8, rather challenging and find myself letting it dangle on the strap at every opportunity, lifting it only when I need to. This works for me. That said, I shoot only for pleasure and/or as a free service for sports clubs these days, so it is not a disaster if I miss the 'money shot'.


5D3, 7D2, EF 16-35 f/2.8L, EF 24-105 f/4L, EF 70-200 f/2.8L II, EF 100-400 f/4.5-5.6L II, EF 1.4x III, Sigma 150mm macro, Lumix LX100 plus a cupboard full of bags, tripods, flashes & stuff.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Chris ­ L ­ F
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
217 posts
Likes: 462
Joined Jan 2013
Location: Warwick, England
     
Jan 09, 2019 18:06 |  #12

Thanks for the further replies. Just the sort of tips and advice that I wanted and will go into the memory bank. There's nothing like hearing from experienced users. The examples of different carrying straps etc. are really useful as is the link to the alternative tripod mount and the use or not of mono-pods. Obviously I will learn from my own experience but it's always good to learn from those who have been there and done that and avoid any pitfalls.

Tom - thanks for telling like it is! Made me chuckle. Just wondered if there was a right or wrong for carrying the camera and lens combo around. Your example shot is a cracker and I can't wait to start having a go.

As to camera I've got a 650D at the moment, it being my first DSLR, which I've had for a few years now. The intention, particularly now that I've got this lens, is to upgrade in the near future, to another crop body, probably the 80D.


Chris


http://www.flickr.com/​photos/hinkleigh/ (external link)
EOS 650D + 4 lenses + Speedlite 600EX-RT G1X Mark II G16 SX210 IS Pixma Pro-100S

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

475 views & 11 likes for this thread
Lens Tips Please - 100-400
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is davidupatterson
722 guests, 262 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.