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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Sports 
Thread started 16 Apr 2019 (Tuesday) 21:58
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Baseball help needed

 
Tim ­ Whitley
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Location: Alabama
     
Apr 16, 2019 21:58 |  #1

I would appreciate evaluation and suggestions for improvement.

Tim


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jwilson
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Apr 17, 2019 06:29 |  #2

IMHO, (1) over-exposed...lower your f-stop to about 5.6; (2) get rid of the angle - catcher and batter need to be on a level playing field; and (3) on shot #2, zoom out just a tad...you want room to the right for the ball to travel if he hits it!




  
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Zivnuska
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Apr 18, 2019 09:33 as a reply to  @ jwilson's post |  #3

I agree that your horizons need to be leveled. You want as much background blur as possible, so I suggest that you shoot wide open. A larger dof from a smaller aperture = more distractions from the background. WRT exposure, if you have not burned out your highlights, you can tweak it in post if you want. Frankly, some minor burnout of white uniforms doesn't bother me. I'm more concerned about skin tones. On days like this with hard shadows, try to open up the shadows and reduce the highlights in post.

Your lens choice was not listed. If you can zoom tighter, give it a try in portrait orientation. Sometimes you want to include the catcher as you have done here and sometimes you won't. Your choice. As was suggested, leave a little more space ahead of the batter than behind. I suggest that you always try to think about the sun and its angle when shooting. As much as possible, you want to minimize the effect of the shadows from the bill of the cap. Obviously, there are limits as what you can do but try. That may mean shooting right handed pitchers toward sundown and southpaws in the morning or shooting when a cloud covers the sun. Do what you can.

Here is an example of what you can do in post if you shoot in RAW.

The BEFORE:


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And after a bit of tweaking in lightroom. I've opened the shadows and reduced the highlights. The exposure was also boosted by 1/2 stop. The shadows on the face are still clearly evident but are far less objectionable.


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bseitz234
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Apr 18, 2019 10:51 |  #4

A few thoughts:

Exposure might be a bit high, but doesn't look crazy overexposed to me. It looks like there's still detail in the highlights. But if you do want to bring the exposure down a bit, I'd shoot at a lower ISO. Since I doubt you need the shutter speed to be quite that high, you might as well keep the ISO as low as reasonably possible.

I do think the framing seems a bit loose, and there are some distracting details. If you're mostly interested in the batter, I'd zoom in (if possible), get closer (if possible), and/or crop out the catcher and some of the headroom. I think having the batter face into the frame, rather than out of it, would be a bit more compelling as well. So if he's facing to the right, keep him at the left 1/3 of the frame, and then you can see the ball coming (and going!) And as long as you're cropping, as already mentioned, level horizons are always good.



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Noitca
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May 15, 2019 13:53 |  #5

I know I am late to the this, and I am certainly no professional.. But, here are my 2 cents.

Aside from some of the technical stuff already said, I would dump #1. Yes, there is the ball and as much as "eyes" in the shot that you can get, but the only one doing "something" in the shot is cut off. From a capture the batter point of view, you will get 10,000 of these shots (took pitch/no swing). Nothing noteworthy here.

Your positioning in both of these is a lot to the side. That is OK, but with this framing I wouldn't try to get batter and catcher in the same shot. Especially if the catcher sets up way back and/or the batter is way up in the box. That begins to work better if you are positioned further up the line... but still, sometimes just focus on one thing when there is only one thing involved.

When focusing on the batter, plan for where they are going to be, not where they are pre-pitch. Batters often move forward (some more than others) during their swing, so, if you frame them dead center before the pitch, by the time they are about to make contact, they are squished up against the edge of the frame they are facing, leaving them "nowhere to go".

Stay on the batter longer than just the hit. Leaving the box can be nearly as interesting as the hit itself. Follow through shots aren't bad either, especially if you are positioned behind the batter to begin with.


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Madisonmike
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Post edited 7 days ago by Madisonmike.
     
May 15, 2019 16:08 |  #6

This shows staying on the batter just after the hit making for a better photo as was mentioned by Noitca. I was a little too tight on the line and cropped too tight. If you can move around the field, you can create more photographic opportunities throughout the game. Not every field lends to this but when it does you can have fun with it.


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Baseball help needed
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