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FORUMS Sony Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Sony Cameras 
Thread started 09 Jun 2017 (Friday) 10:57
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Sony Lounge Thread MKIII (All Sony cameras welcome)

 
xpfloyd
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May 15, 2019 09:43 |  #28891

Charlie wrote in post #18861789 (external link)
the part where the remote is velcro'd on, you cant hold the gimbal by that, so it's a perfect spot. I typically do changes to settings prior to starting video, and this allows me to do it without touching the camera. Very awkward to do when the gimbal is powered on.

It’s not a rabbit hole I want to go down just yet but was curious of the setup. It looks good


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Post edited 8 days ago by xpfloyd.
     
May 15, 2019 09:51 |  #28892

xpfloyd wrote in post #18861796 (external link)
GoPro still leads the way IMO. GoPro 7 is waterproof without a housing to 10m and has better slomo. Not read into the other specs yet though

Edit - just done a bit more reading into it and it actually looks quite good. Waterproof-ness and slo-mo are pretty much on par. The selfie screen on the dji will be good for framing those type shots. The dji also has a tighter crop which I prefer (i shoot my GoPro in linear mode to avoid the wide GoPro look ). Will be interesting to see how the dji fairs in real world reviews. I’m totally happy with my GoPro though and wouldn’t want to give up time warp


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May 15, 2019 09:55 |  #28893

TRhoads wrote in post #18858810 (external link)
DJI has something cooking...my guess...underwater photography...

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Hosted photo: posted by TRhoads in
./showthread.php?p=188​58810&i=i16982155
forum: Sony Cameras

DJI Osmo Action...to compete with the GoPro...might pick one up...
https://www.dji.com/os​mo-action (external link)


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Charlie
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Post edited 8 days ago by Charlie.
     
May 15, 2019 10:08 |  #28894

xpfloyd wrote in post #18861800 (external link)
Edit - just done a bit more reading into it and it actually looks quite good. Waterproof-ness and slo-mo are pretty much on par. The selfie screen on the dji will be good for framing those type shots. The dji also has a tighter crop which I prefer (i shoot my GoPro in linear mode to avoid the wide GoPro look ). Will be interesting to see how the dji fairs in real world reviews. I’m totally happy with my GoPro though and wouldn’t want to give up time warp

apparently, DJI has a hyperlapse mode, and isnt the only one that claims to have timewarp like features, I just havent seen anyone do it well, with the exception of insta 360, which IMO does it even better than gopro! Insta 360 has some pretty big flaws of its own that prevents it from replacing gopro currently..... basically no audio, and image quality is still work in progress due to the nature of 360 cameras.

osmo action review by the great one


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Charlie
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May 15, 2019 11:33 |  #28895

Found out an epic fail with the sony bluetooth remote.....

All the retailers and sony claims it works with the A9..... it does NOT.

wont work with it till firmware 6.0 :rolleyes:


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TRhoads
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May 15, 2019 11:38 |  #28896

Charlie wrote in post #18861853 (external link)
Found out an epic fail with the sony bluetooth remote.....

All the retailers and sony claims it works with the A9..... it does NOT.

wont work with it till firmware 6.0 :rolleyes:

will have to check i t out...I was trying to use the new Imaging Edge app yesterday with the a9...it would work fine for a while and then crash...was really frustrating.


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Charlie
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May 15, 2019 11:58 |  #28897

TRhoads wrote in post #18861855 (external link)
will have to check i t out...I was trying to use the new Imaging Edge app yesterday with the a9...it would work fine for a while and then crash...was really frustrating.

on the R3, the remote is amazing. No on off switch, it always simply works. It does seem to go to sleep on its own, probably to save battery, so the first time you use it after a long sleep, there's a 1/4 - 1/2 second delay, and then it's immediately responsive afterwards, pretty neat.

no line of site needed

no dongles/cords

fine focus from remote (good for stacking or using AF for landscapes)

c1, love it, wish it had two, but I'll take one, happy with that

zoom from remote, a huge deal for me to be able to electronically zoom in video, nice and smoothly.

downside is that it seems to interfere with sleep, like the IR remote, so dont forget to turn off your camera, it may stay on until you have depleted your battery.

another bluetooth limitation is that it needs to be paired to one device, so sharing it between two cameras...... cumbersome. Need to pair everytime. Likely not an issue for me, for posed shots, or video, I'll likely use the R3 anyhow.


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May 15, 2019 15:48 |  #28898

Bianchi wrote in post #18861757 (external link)
Globally Grown and Crafted locally .. The word Crafted leaves a lot to the readers imagination. Virgin Olive Oil it's stone ground & cold pressed, and the label should state that, not crafted

The title scars me, because if there Olives are grown Globally, then shipped to Calif to be processed, Then its not freshly stone ground & cold pressed.

Additionally the label used on the bottle for marketing magic sales, which could mean anything as far as the process is concerned

FYI

An article on Olive Oil you may find enlightening

The Olive Oil Scandal
By Raymond Francis

For more than a decade I have advised people to substitute olive oil for the regular oils available in the supermarket. Good advice. But here's the problem: trying to find real olive oil is like looking for a needle in a haystack. Olive oil has been part of the human diet for more than 5000 years. These millennia of human experience plus modem research indicate that olive oil is beneficial to health and that we can safely include it in our diet. In fact, olive oil has been singled out as contributing to the health of Greek centenarians. But, to get the same health effects as the Greek centenarians, the oil has to be made the way they made it. The problem is most of the olive oil on the market does not duplicate what our ancestors were eating, and people are not getting what they think they are buying. Almost all olive oil is processed in ways that result in the loss of nutrients which are essential to health.

Olive oil is almost unique among oils in that it can be consumed in the crude form without refining. This has the effect of conserving all its vitamins, essential fatty acids, and other nutrients. Because it contains all these nutrients, including powerful antioxidants, real extra virgin olive oil is beneficial to health and protects us from damage by free radical oxidation. Cell membranes contain fatty acids that are highly susceptible to free radical damage. This damage produces lipid peroxides that can kill the cell. Real olive oil contains polyphenols, vitamin E, and other natural antioxidants that prevent this damage.

Numerous studies show that olive oil reduces cholesterol, lowers blood pressure, inhibits platelet aggregation, and lowers the incidence of breast cancer. Because it is so rich in antioxidants, olive oil appears to dramatically reduce the oxidation of LDL cholesterol, thereby preventing heart disease. These same antioxidants also add to the stability, shelf life, and flavor of the oil.

Historically, high quality olive oil, rich in antioxidants, was easy to obtain, but not any more. Today, high quality oil is available only in relatively small quantities, usually from family owned farms, where the oils are produced in ways similar to how the Greeks and Romans made theirs. On these farms, olives are picked by hand so as not to damage the skin or pulp. They are transported in well aerated containers and milled within 48 hours of harvesting. Before milling, leaves and twigs are removed, the olives washed and dried, and then stone pressed the same way as it was done in antiquity. The resulting olive paste was then pressed in a hydraulic press without the use of heat, hot water, or solvents. The oil is left unfiltered as filtering removes many nutrients. The first pressing produces the best "extra virgin" oil.

The problem with most of today's olive oil is that it is rarely produced in the old way, which is more time consuming and expensive. Due to the increasing demand for olive oil, the trend has been to reduce production costs by moving toward more automation and concentration of production in ever larger installations. These modem factories extract more oil more cheaply, but their processing methods substantially reduce the nutritional quality of the oil.

To reduce costs, olives are machine harvested along with leaves and twigs. Olives that have dropped on the ground, which can be said to contain bad oil, are often mixed with the good ones. They are shipped in all kinds of containers, many of which are poorly ventilated, and heaped in large piles where the olives are stored for too long and often become moldy. The oil is then extracted in a continuous centrifuge where hot water is used to help separate out the oil.

Antioxidant polyphenols are soluble in water and are washed away in this process, thereby lowering the shelf life and the nutritional quality of the oil. Italy alone produces 800,000 cubic meters of waste water per year from this process. Because substantial amounts of antioxidants are washed away, factory produced olive oils have a short shelf life of only months, whereas real olive oil lasts for two to three years. Factory produced olive oil is filtered and looks clear. Real olive oil is not filtered and looks cloudy.

Most people think that by purchasing "extra virgin" olive oil they are getting a high quality oil.

Unfortunately, in most cases, this is not true. It's more complex than that. A label reading extra virgin is no guarantee of quality. For one thing, nowhere does it say that extra virgin olive oil has to be made 100% from olives. An major criterion for grading olive oil is its level of acidity. Extra virgin oil should have a free oleic acid acidity of no more than one percent, whereas ordinary virgin olive oil can have an acidity of up to 3.3 percent.

Lower quality oils can be refined to bring the acidity down so they can be labeled as extra virgin. But now the oil has been refined, and that's not what you want. That's why being labeled extra virgin is no guarantee of getting high quality oil, which has not been processed in ways that reduce its nutritional value. To complicate matters even more, the term "extra virgin" has no official meaning in the United States. The U.S. is not a member of the International Olive Oil Council. So, olive oil sold here can be labeled extra virgin without meeting the accepted international standards.

Another reason why you can't trust extra virgin olive oil is exemplified by a problem that manifested last year, and may turn out to be the biggest food fraud of the 20th Century. Despite the fact that details of this scandal have been published in Merum, a Swiss-German magazine, and in Italian journals such as Agra Trade, and the newspaper Gazzetta del Mezzogiorno, this information has been successfully suppressed and is known to only a handful. Investigators are gathering evidence indicating that the biggest olive oil brands in Italy have for years been systematically diluting their extra virgin olive oil with cheap, highly-refined hazelnut oil imported from Turkey. International arrest warrants have been issued and so far documents indicate that at least ten thousand tons of hazelnut oil are involved. As much as 20% hazelnut oil can be added to olive oil and still be undetectable to the consumer. In fact olive oil labeled "Italian" often comes from Turkey, Tunisia, Morocco, Spain, and Greece. Considering w
hat has happened in Europe, where there are strict regulations, imagine what can happen in California where there are no regulations. Apparently, more oil is "produced" in California than there are olives available. The truth is, most of the extra virgin olive oil on the market does not supply all the nutritional value and health giving properties that we have a right to expect from olive oil.

This is scary stuff when you consider how extremely important oil is to human health. Our modem chronic disease problems are the result of radically changing, in a short period of time, the fundamental parameters of human existence, namely: diet, environment, and behavior. One of the most fundamental changes in our diet has been the kind and the amount of fats and oils that we consume. For example, the consumption of hydrogenated oils has proved to be a disaster for human health. Hydrogenated oils have been implicated in both our cancer and heart disease epidemics. In fact, all modem processed oils are injurious to human health. To reverse our pandemic of chronic disease, we have to return to eating a more traditional diet, and high quality olive oil can safely be included in that diet. It's not so much that olive oil should be added to the diet as much as healthy, real olive oil should be used to replace the unhealthy, processed oils now being consumed.

How does one ensure that they are eating the most healthful oil? Find an extra virgin olive oil that is cold pressed, unfiltered, and looks cloudy. The oil should be packaged in dark glass bottles to protect it from the damaging effects of light. Real olive oil is still made in small estate bottled settings. The challenge is to find one that does it! all right.

After selecting the oil, it has to be stored properly. When properly stored, real extra virgin olive oil can last two to three years. Because of processing, most of the extra virgin oil on the market has a shelf life of only a few months. A good rule of thumb is to purchase oil in small bottles and consume it within a year of purchase; this will also ensure getting the best flavor. Store the oil away from both heat and light.

Storing in a dark place is important because exposure to light will start a chain reaction that will destroy the oil a thousand times faster than oxygen. During storage, olive oil oxidizes and undergoes a slow, continuous, and irreversible deterioration until it becomes inedible.

The bottom line is that modem, factory- produced olive oil has been stripped of its health enhancing nutrients, and the task of selecting a high quality oil has been made very difficult.The olives are grown without pesticides.

They are hand picked from the trees, carefully washed and dried, and milled with a stone wheel within 48 hours of harvesting. It is pressed in a hydraulic press, collected in stainless steel vats, decanted, and bottled.

This first cold pressed oil is the real stuff and retains all the natural flavor and goodness

Raymond Francis is an M. L T.-trained scientist and an internationally recognized leader in the emerging field of optimal health maintenance.


With the growing awareness, advance research and increased concerns for health hazards, the demand of for this healthy oil is rising.

The health benefits of olive oil include treatment of colon and breast cancer, diabetes, heart problems, arthritis, and high cholesterol. It also aids weight loss, improves metabolism, digestion, and prevents aging.

Reduces Heart Problems
The natural olive oil contains 70% monounsaturated fatty acid. As a result, it lowers cholesterol accumulation in the blood and reduces heart problems.

Lowers Cholesterol Levels
LDL cholesterol is the bad type of cholesterol, which increases the risk of heart attacks and pulmonary heart diseases. Extra virgin olive oil, which is rich in almost 40 antioxidant chemicals, helps reduce the oxidation effects of LDL cholesterol. It also helps increase the HDL cholesterol levels.

Olive oil has been one of the most produced and widely consumed vegetable oils around the world for centuries. Sometimes described as “the liquid gold”.

That's an interesting read, thanks for sharing. My family comes from Portugal where olive oil is a very traditional staple. My grandfather had a large amount of centuries old olive trees on the margins of the Douro river in North Eastern Portugal. I recall my dad telling us stories of the olive harvest when he was a child and the amount of work involved in picking and pressing the olives much in the way the article descibes. Olives were cold rolled inside of granite cylindrical "bowls by large granite roller into a paste for extraction. In respect to the hand picking I'm not sure how much of that was actually done that way, traditionally tarps would be laid around each tree and they would use long poles to "wack" the upper branches, the olives would fall onto the cotton tarps for collection. Today the poles have been replaced with "shaker" devices on poles driven by small trimmer motors.

It is still a tradition today for locals to travel to the small farmers that continue to grow olives and purchase olive oil directly from them, it's about as virgin as you can get, that oil definitely has a different taste to some of the retail stuff that is available.


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May 15, 2019 15:54 |  #28899

Just browsing some Peter McKinnon stuff & he's got his hands on the DJI Osmo Action - https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=P-vrRonsap0 (external link)


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May 15, 2019 16:09 |  #28900

MedicineMan4040 wrote in post #18861654 (external link)
Forgot, Poof (the better-half) has one.
Mid-year, as in July maybe? That might work. I fly out Aug. 21......doubtful though.

Haha surprised you didn't remember sooner :p
Well to me if the preorders open then, it will probably take a few more months to actually go on sale. I think the post just said mid year and didn't have a specified date. Maybe Tamron announced it a little too early.

xpfloyd wrote in post #18861750 (external link)
I was the same previously and then tried the FE28 due to lack of options. Really fell for that lens and bought it twice previously (and now miss it). Ignore what the negative reviews say and give it a try would be my advice

I made the vow to not buy any more camera gear after my last two lenses and hope to keep it but I may consider the 28mm next year :) I was originally planning on getting it when I moved to Sony but as my Canon 35mm performed so well, I just stuck with it.


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May 15, 2019 16:27 |  #28901

xpfloyd wrote in post #18861800 (external link)
Edit - just done a bit more reading into it and it actually looks quite good. Waterproof-ness and slo-mo are pretty much on par. The selfie screen on the dji will be good for framing those type shots. The dji also has a tighter crop which I prefer (i shoot my GoPro in linear mode to avoid the wide GoPro look ). Will be interesting to see how the dji fairs in real world reviews. I’m totally happy with my GoPro though and wouldn’t want to give up time warp

I was checking it out as well although given that I just bought a GoPro 7 Black I'm not particularly interested in a new system. I also tend to shoot the GoPro in linear mode especially when straight vertical lines are in the shot, I suppose you could de-fish in post but honestly I really don't see a need if I'm taping large distant views.

I was somewhat interested in a gimbal for the GoPro and in particular the Feiyutech G6 but after reading all the issues trying to link it to the Hero 7 black a moved away from that, not that I really needed it quite frankly.


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Post edited 7 days ago by Bianchi. (3 edits in all)
     
May 15, 2019 19:30 |  #28902

Miranda1 wrote in post #18861933 (external link)
That's an interesting read, thanks for sharing. My family comes from Portugal where olive oil is a very traditional staple. My grandfather had a large amount of centuries old olive trees on the margins of the Douro river in North Eastern Portugal. I recall my dad telling us stories of the olive harvest when he was a child and the amount of work involved in picking and pressing the olives much in the way the article descibes. Olives were cold rolled inside of granite cylindrical "bowls by large granite roller into a paste for extraction. In respect to the hand picking I'm not sure how much of that was actually done that way, traditionally tarps would be laid around each tree and they would use long poles to "wack" the upper branches, the olives would fall onto the cotton tarps for collection. Today the poles have been replaced with "shaker" devices on poles driven by small trimmer motors.

It is still a tradition today for locals to travel to the small farmers that continue to grow olives and purchase olive oil directly from them, it's about as virgin as you can get, that oil definitely has a different taste to some of the retail stuff that is available.


When I posted this I did think of you, as you mentioned your roots were from Portugal in various posts , so I figured you would relate

In Europe in older times the small villages would have a centralized stone grinding wheel for the entire village to use.. I have a friend in Tuscany who has that centralized stone grinding wheel on his property that was the centralized stone grinding wheel for the entire village to use.


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Post edited 7 days ago by TRhoads.
     
May 15, 2019 19:48 |  #28903

Golden Gate Bridge and some passing clouds...100 Seconds


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May 15, 2019 20:10 |  #28904

TMaG82 wrote in post #18861787 (external link)
DJI Action Camera being announced looks interesting. I’ve yet to ever buy an action camera (never bought a Go Pro, never bought a Yi Mi or other), but this might get a buy from me.

Waterproof without a housing and if I’m not mistaken $350 isn’t that crazy.

https://www.bhphotovid​eo.com …smo_action_4k_c​amera.html (external link)

and looks like the hype for rocksolid stabilization is not true.

here's an unbias video i found..


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May 15, 2019 20:21 |  #28905

TRhoads wrote in post #18862055 (external link)
Golden Gate Bridge and some passing clouds...100 Seconds


thumbnail
Hosted photo: posted by TRhoads in
./showthread.php?p=188​62055&i=i129365330
forum: Sony Cameras

Beautiful image and really nice location you shot it from, I don't really see this spot and composition!


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