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Thread started 19 Oct 2009 (Monday) 21:52
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How my old 10D ended up in a major motion picture...

 
gjl711
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May 27, 2019 10:06 |  #31

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18868133 (external link)
.

.
I am surprised that you never reported back to this thread to let us know the name of the movie, and to tell us other things, like what scene your camera was in, what they did with it, whether there were any pics on the memory card, etc, etc, etc.

It seems like there would be so many details to tell about - so much minutia - and it is surprising that we haven't been told any of these details.

.

Looks like the OP sold a whole bunch of stuff 2 years ago then left.


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May 27, 2019 10:17 |  #32

.

gjl711 wrote in post #18868138 (external link)
Looks like the OP sold a whole bunch of stuff 2 years ago then left.

.
He was logged in to the forum just 14 days ago.

I sent him a PM to let him know that his thread was revived and to ask him to come back to fill us in on the details.

These are some of the questions I had for him (listed below). If anyone has anything else they would like to know, feel free to ask here so that if he comes back to the thread he can (hopefully) answer your question.

__________ __________ __________ __________ ___________

Were there any pics on the memory card when you got the camera back?

Did they return the camera when they said they would, or were they late in returning it to you?

Who returned your camera to you? . Was it the same woman who came to pick it up, or was it someone else?

Did they pay you in cash, as promised, or did they give you a check?

Did they pay you the full $200, as promised, or did they try to just give you the $100 that they originally mentioned?

What movie was it?

Did the scene with your camera make it into the final production?

If so, what scene was it in? . For how many seconds did your camera appear?

What did the actor do with your camera? . What was the name of the actor/actress who used your camera? . What was their character's name?



.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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aroundlsu
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May 28, 2019 10:20 |  #33

Wow interesting to see what I was excited about 10 years ago! Since this thread, I've mostly quit professional photography to become a professional union cinematographer. I've shot around 40 films and directed 3 of my own.

I'm not even sure which movie I'm talking about here as since then I've supplied props, vehicles, weapons, and all sorts of things for probably 100 films that come through the South. Many films don't even get released for one reason or another. I've spent months on films with major actors that never see the light of day. Two years ago I worked on a Keanu Reeves film that was given a very small release and no one has ever heard of.

Now that I'm thinking about it, the movie may have been The Courier with Mickey Rourke and Jeffrey Dean Morgan:
https://en.wikipedia.o​rg/wiki/The_Courier_(2​012_film (external link))

It was released in 2012 but we shot it around that time in 2009. I had a pretty big role as a cinematographer on it and supplied many props for it. There is a courthouse scene with a bunch of reporters outside that I seem to remember supplying cameras for. I did my best to make sure the fake cameraman in the film look like they knew what they were doing as I hate it when I see a photographer in a movie and you can tell he's never held a camera in his life.

Anyway, feel free to ask me anything you want about working for the film industry. I started out as a photographer in the film industry then transitioned to cinematography and directing which is what I always wanted.


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May 28, 2019 11:39 |  #34

aroundlsu wrote in post #18868722 (external link)
Anyway, feel free to ask me anything you want about working for the film industry.

1. Is it as exciting as it looks from the uninformed audience's end?

2. Flubs of the kind you're talking about, such as inauthentic props, can end up publicized on moviemistakes.com and similar sites. A viewer will say "The scene is set on Christmas Day 1937, but the model of radio shown on a shelf next to the coffee cups didn't come out until February 1938." Do the person or persons responsible follow such feedback and take it seriously?

3. Why do they roll the end credits too fast to read? We always want to see who did what, or at least what the jobs were.

Congratulations on your career advancement!


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May 28, 2019 11:58 as a reply to  @ aroundlsu's post |  #35

The actress was Ruby Dee and likely one of these films?

https://en.wikipedia.o​rg/wiki/Ruby_Dee#Work (external link)


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May 28, 2019 14:36 |  #36

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18868753 (external link)
The actress was Ruby Dee and likely one of these films?

https://en.wikipedia.o​rg/wiki/Ruby_Dee#Work (external link)

Ah then it was the movie called "Video Girl". To be honest, I never watched that movie and have no idea where the camera is in that film.


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May 28, 2019 14:49 |  #37

OhLook wrote in post #18868744 (external link)
1. Is it as exciting as it looks from the uninformed audience's end?

2. Flubs of the kind you're talking about, such as inauthentic props, can end up publicized on moviemistakes.com and similar sites. A viewer will say "The scene is set on Christmas Day 1937, but the model of radio shown on a shelf next to the coffee cups didn't come out until February 1938." Do the person or persons responsible follow such feedback and take it seriously?

3. Why do they roll the end credits too fast to read? We always want to see who did what, or at least what the jobs were.

Congratulations on your career advancement!

1. Movie sets can be very boring for most of the crew. The exceptions are the director and cinematographer as we are usually working non stop all day either setting up shots or actually shooting them. The rest of the crew usually only works during the set up or the shoot so they are standing by waiting most of the time. With that said, there can be some very exciting moments that the average person can't relate to and will never experience. Like being part of a shoot out and car chase through the New Orleans French Quarter, diving for a week with Dolph Lundgren, flying in a helicopter over the ocean while filming all day over a recreated WWII disaster scene with hundreds of extras in the water below you, and many other countless experiences.

2. When I try to bring up flubs and mistakes to producers or directors I usually get shut down. Most producers just want to get the movie done and don't feel minor mistakes are going to have any impact on how much money their movie makes. If it slows down production in any way they don't want to hear about it. I've learn to just stick to doing my job and will rarely speak up if I see improper weapons handling, cop tactics, poor computer handling skills, etc.

3. The films I've personally written and directed I've tried to stretch out and slow down my credits as usually I'm a little short on runtime! haha. When directing a film the expected run time is in the contract so I have to deliver a completed film including credits within a few minutes of an expected time. If it's too long you're going to have problems getting a good TV deal. After everything else is done, the credits are the final place I can buy a few seconds by speeding up the roll a few percentage.


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May 28, 2019 15:48 |  #38

aroundlsu wrote in post #18868851 (external link)
1. Movie sets can be very boring for most of the crew. . . .

Thank you for these answers.

Little mistakes in films grab my attention as a viewer. Bambi: Thumper's feet are drawn wrong. Rabbits don't have footpads. Instead, their soles have coarse hair. For all the study that Disney animators invested in animal anatomy and movement, you'd think they'd have . . . Florence Foster Jenkins: Women's stockings in the 1940s had seams. Didn't the costumers know this?


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May 28, 2019 15:59 |  #39

Assuming you mean the original, when you have to draw each cartoon frame one after the other, I am sure there are anatomical shortcuts taken. I suspect drawing fur all over the rabbit's foot and getting them aligned frame to frame might be difficult. Of course it could just have been poor research and an artist "drew" his own conclusions on what rabbit feet look like. :)


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May 28, 2019 19:24 |  #40

aroundlsu wrote in post #18868839 (external link)
Ah then it was the movie called "Video Girl". To be honest, I never watched that movie and have no idea where the camera is in that film.

For those of you interested, the movie can be streamed online here:

https://tubitv.com/mov​ies/473469/video_girl (external link)




  
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May 28, 2019 19:27 |  #41

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18868897 (external link)
Assuming you mean the original, when you have to draw each cartoon frame one after the other, I am sure there are anatomical shortcuts taken. I suspect drawing fur all over the rabbit's foot and getting them aligned frame to frame might be difficult. Of course it could just have been poor research and an artist "drew" his own conclusions on what rabbit feet look like. :)

I do mean the original. Fur wasn't rendered in detail there; the mammals' coats are pretty smooth, this being Disney in 1942, not Pixar in 2000-something. Here's a clip. (external link) You can see the bottom of a foot about 30 seconds in. Perhaps the character sketches that artists were to follow got it wrong or neglected to show the needed view.


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May 29, 2019 05:00 |  #42

I like the way this thread has become like a game of Pictionary. Start with a 10D as a movie prop, I just Googled rabbit's foot to see what they really look like. Disney could have saved a bit of effort and just put no detail in the feet. I'm going with they never looked into it. They should have Googled  :p


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May 29, 2019 05:19 as a reply to  @ Choderboy's post |  #43

Walt himself said, in 1952 when many inaccurate Bambi things were brought up to him, "You know what else? Deer don't talk either." I am sure he knew all this but his goal was entertainment and not reality TV. :)

What I wonder is what Walt would think of his legacy now, particularly what the Disney empire had turned into.


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May 29, 2019 11:15 |  #44

Choderboy wrote in post #18869156 (external link)
Disney could have saved a bit of effort and just put no detail in the feet. I'm going with they never looked into it.

I agree. All the animals were stylized, but this meant simplifying their anatomy. There was no reason to add features.

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18869158 (external link)
Walt himself said, in 1952 when many inaccurate Bambi things were brought up to him, "You know what else? Deer don't talk either." I am sure he knew all this but his goal was entertainment and not reality TV. :)

I bet he didn't know about the feet. He was issuing a defensive retort, not an explanation. Any number of pet owners, rabbit breeders, veterinarians, hunters, and manufacturers of lucky charms would have noticed the result of his studio's insufficient research.


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May 29, 2019 11:27 as a reply to  @ OhLook's post |  #45

'Rabbit Foot' Google surprised me, so many Rabbit's feet on key rings. And some other pretty weird stuff. I assume the true nature of their pad less feet is what makes them so popular for lucky charms. Creepy charms if you ask me.


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