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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Nature & Landscapes 
Thread started 31 Jul 2018 (Tuesday) 02:09
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Native Australian Flowers

 
Pippan
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Jun 01, 2019 21:55 |  #46

avondale87 wrote in post #18871136 (external link)
similar, but different to ours.
Fascinating plants and beautiful flowers

Especially when you can use a grass stalk to trigger the flower and show people how it works (as long as they look closely--as you know, they are very small flowers). People are really fascinated. Here's another trigger plant, Stylidium fissilobum, from a boggy sand-plain just north of Litchfield National Park.


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avondale87
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Jun 01, 2019 21:58 |  #47

Pippan wrote in post #18871157 (external link)
Especially when you can use a grass stalk to trigger the flower and show people how it works (as long as they look closely--as you know, they are very small flowers). People are really fascinated. Here's another trigger plant, Stylidium fissilobum, from a boggy sand-plain just north of Litchfield National Park.

Yeh. My daughter loved that and would set off everyone she could find.
I used to tell her she's killing the poor thing - starving it to death  :p



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Pippan
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Jun 01, 2019 23:19 |  #48

Yet another carnivorous plant, a sundew, Drosera indica, from wheel tracks in a boggy sand plain just north of Litchfield National Park. These boggy sand plains are very low in soil nutrients, hence the need for many plants to supplement or replace nutrients from soil with nutrients from insects.

Sundews have on their leaves lots of hairs covered with a sticky, dew-like substance that traps insects that land on them. Enzymes in the 'dew' then slowly digest the insect, allowing the plant to absorb the resulting nutrients.


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Lyn2011
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Jun 02, 2019 02:54 |  #49

Pippan wrote in post #18871050 (external link)
Thanks Richard, yes, that's the one.

Sorry to hear about your grandfather. I just read the story about his life, he will be greatly missed. Hopefully somebody takes his work over.




  
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Jun 04, 2019 02:32 |  #50

Lyn2011 wrote in post #18871263 (external link)
Sorry to hear about your grandfather. I just read the story about his life, he will be greatly missed. Hopefully somebody takes his work over.

Thanks so much Lyn. He had, over the last 35 years, compiled an impressive manuscript with the intention of publishing a book about the culture and history of the Litchfield National Park region, so we'll be working towards getting it published.


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Jun 16, 2019 04:12 |  #51

one of our endemic native Eucalyptus - but I don't know it's name :oops:


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Lyn2011
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Jun 16, 2019 04:23 |  #52

avondale87 wrote in post #18878495 (external link)
one of our endemic native Eucalyptus - but I don't know it's name :oops:

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Beautiful flowers. It could be the Tasmanian Blue Gum (Eucalyptus globulus), I looked it up on Google, because I love the native flowers. But there are more eucalyptus with white flowers, so I'm not sure.




  
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Jun 16, 2019 15:28 |  #53

Lyn2011 wrote in post #18878498 (external link)
Beautiful flowers. It could be the Tasmanian Blue Gum (Eucalyptus globulus), I looked it up on Google, because I love the native flowers. But there are more eucalyptus with white flowers, so I'm not sure.

Thanks.
It's not our blue gum. We've one growing here too.
It's only about 2.5 metres high, got smashed by wind a while back and recovered. But it's on a very stoney bank so might not be full potential height.
I always understood it to be a small species though.



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Aug 13, 2019 20:24 |  #54

Brachychiton paradoxus. When those green seed pods ripen (turn brown) the large seeds can be eaten after roasting the irritant hairs off them.

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Sep 15, 2019 06:54 |  #55

Nymphaea violacea in a tiny, muddy little waterhole, the last, dry season vestige of a creek, surrounded by country burnt black by fires.

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Post edited 10 months ago by avondale87.
     
Sep 15, 2019 22:35 as a reply to  @ Pippan's post |  #56

That's very beautiful.
Lovely photo.

Typifies us here.
Out of seemingly nothing, life bursts forth.



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Pippan
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Sep 15, 2019 23:50 |  #57

avondale87 wrote in post #18927523 (external link)
That's very beautiful.
Lovely photo.

Typifies us here.
Out of seemingly nothing life bursts forth.

Thanks Richard. That is so very true.


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Choderboy
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Sep 16, 2019 03:54 |  #58

Hardenbergia. I have been told I'm weird for thinking it looks like Yosemite Sam but I just think some people have no imagination.


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avondale87
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Sep 20, 2019 23:41 |  #59

Brown Boronia ~ Boronia megastigma


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One of the sweetest scents around.


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Sep 20, 2019 23:44 |  #60

Tasmannia lanceolata ~ commonly known as Tasmanian pepperberry, mountain pepper, native pepper
These are just breaking flower here


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