Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Transportation 
Thread started 07 Feb 2006 (Tuesday) 10:18
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Post Your Best Train Shot......

 
jcothron
Goldmember
Avatar
3,793 posts
Gallery: 398 photos
Likes: 10390
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Gainesville, GA
     
Dec 19, 2019 08:43 |  #5611

unclejohn wrote in post #18977195 (external link)
I would cheer you even if you had done it. When I was young, I wouldn't have missed flattening pins and coins and other things under trains. There was an uphill near where I lived and sometimes a train would slow down a lot in there. About 5 km further up there was a station. I remember once riding there on the steps of a passenger car, outside the door so the conductor didn't see me. Then I jumped off when the train slowed down and walked home. But I hadn't counted on what the smoke from the locomotive would do to me. My mother had a few words to say about that.


thank you, and it sounds like you had an interesting childhood lol. I've seen pennies,etc that have been flattened by trains but I haven't ever done it myself. About the extent of my interaction with train tracks was jumping the "train track hump" in my vehicle in the town I grew up in... which in retrospect would only be slightly safer.


John
Gear List|My Flickr (external link)|Website (external link)|
Instagram (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
happyduck
Goldmember
Avatar
1,892 posts
Gallery: 475 photos
Likes: 1496
Joined May 2008
Location: North west England
     
Dec 19, 2019 09:19 |  #5612

Freightliner 66617 hauling Empty stone wagons from Hardendale Qry Shap (Fhh) to Tunstead Sdgs passing faringdon curve


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Canon 70D 80D [ Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Canon Speedlite 430EX II
Prudence never pays
And everything she wants costs money

My Flkr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jcothron
Goldmember
Avatar
3,793 posts
Gallery: 398 photos
Likes: 10390
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Gainesville, GA
     
Dec 19, 2019 09:21 |  #5613

Ballen Photo wrote in post #18977213 (external link)
This is a nice shot, and I can see why members might be concerned for your safety. This is why I have learned (mostly) to not say anything when I'm not aware of the circumstances. I do hope you will post more trains in the future. :-)


Thank you, and I likely will. From my perspective I didn't really read those comments as being anything about my personal safety but more along the lines of "how dare you do something so stupid while breaking the law at the same time". Those aren't the words, but it felt pretty close to that. That lead me to feeling like I needed to defend my "shot" as it were since the implication wasn't true on either account.

You know, I see shots of tigers and lions with a full face view of a look that says "I'm about to eat you". Now personally I can't imagine myself being in those positions to get a shot like that (even cropped if so) and to ME it doesn't look very safe. I don't feel the need to point it out to the person that took the shot. I'm sure that in most cases the shooter took precautions and evaluated the environment then decided they could get the shot without undue risk to personal injury. I may or may not have made the same decision and I can't know that because I wasn't there.... but I shouldn't assume they didn't.

I watched a guy in Grand Teton National Park approaching a grizzly with cubs nearby (I was in a vehicle on the road). Now personally I thought... "this guy is crazy for doing that" even though the grizzly was 70 yards or so away from him. I drove on and learned there was an attack in that area with injuries involved. Same guy? I have no idea but in my opinion those situations are pretty dangerous being the animal has thoughts of its on, likely contradictory to the person trying to get a close shot.

Anyone that follows me at all knows I shoot waterfalls, lots of waterfalls. I've watched people decide to climb (or try) a waterfall...slick rocks and all.... only to come tumbling back down on their head. In a specific case I recommended against the activity, and ended up jogging the better part of a mile to get a signal to call 911. He fell on his head. Still, I shoot waterfalls but it is VERY rare for me to climb them and even the vantage points I get at times involve some danger... in which I'm very deliberate in my movements to the point of testing traction, kicking rocks to make sure they don't move...and once getting set not moving my feet at all while getting the shot. Tough on the knees at times but I'm 52 and "knock on wood" have managed to stay completely injury free in my pursuits.

The most likely danger I faced while taking that train shot was tripping over a broken piece of railroad tie and hitting my head on a rock or something.

Now to be clear, I know very little about trains... and I have no direct knowledge of flagging or rail clamping. I do have a good knowledge of engineering however so when I say that switch is in operable :

1. I mean the huge lock that exists on the portion that "slides" to move the rails in effect keeps those rails from sliding...thereby making it impossible for a train to get onto the abandoned spur unless that lock is removed and the switch is actuated.
2. I also know, that because there are two sets of rails... a train traveling on the set of rails not connected to the spur at all makes it all but impossible for the same train to get onto the spur even if the switch were activated

So from a risk standpoint, it would take a catastrophic failure to result in that train coming my way.... such as it derailing. In fact that is the only way I could see that train ending up where I was standing or anywhere close to it. That IS a real risk... those things happen. The same risk you might be taking if you are standing 30 feet away from the track itself and taking a shot as the train passes of which I'm sure there are many examples of shots like that.

While I haven't (or intend to) look up the statistics I suspect that risk would be somewhere in the range of a plane crash, getting struck by lightening, getting run over by a car in a parking lot, or being involved in an auto accident. Actually I suspect some of those examples are far more likely.

You can look at an image and make assumptions but it's probably more prudent in most cases to not let your internal dialogue leak because it is probably your assumptions are incorrect. I mean if we are concerned about safety we could say something like "wow, are you sure you feel safe standing there?" which is significantly less abrasive and probably results in the same explanation without the condescending tones.

Enough about that though... I need to get to work on editing my video taken through a windshield at 130mph (believe me I'm joking) :)


John
Gear List|My Flickr (external link)|Website (external link)|
Instagram (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jcothron
Goldmember
Avatar
3,793 posts
Gallery: 398 photos
Likes: 10390
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Gainesville, GA
     
Dec 19, 2019 09:22 |  #5614

avondale87 wrote in post #18977244 (external link)
John don't let that derail your posting.
Keep them coming.
One of the problems with photos.
They say a photo is worth a thousand words but how untrue can that be.
Whilst I share concern for your safety, having worked in around and on rails etc I know it can bring an extra sense of awareness of the dangers that lurk.

John C I've surveyed mangled bodies and murders (corpses) scenes, and it leaves an indelible print on the grey matter so your concerns are no doubt well founded.


Thanks Richard


John
Gear List|My Flickr (external link)|Website (external link)|
Instagram (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jcothron
Goldmember
Avatar
3,793 posts
Gallery: 398 photos
Likes: 10390
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Gainesville, GA
     
Dec 19, 2019 09:23 |  #5615

Eidelweiss wrote in post #18977429 (external link)
[Sarcasm on]
JC, tell the truth:

You really had a damsel tied to the track like Simon Barsinister, or Boris Badenuff.:rolleyes:
[Sarcasm off]

I was lambasted too, about the spikes on a track.
Let's all just enjoy the photography, and appreciate the work added to these threads.

Great photo, nice work JC.

Chris~

Yes I remember seeing that post... thank you.

Now REAL danger would have been having a damsel anywhere around me for any reason.. the danger being explaining it to my lovely wife. lol


John
Gear List|My Flickr (external link)|Website (external link)|
Instagram (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
unclejohn
Senior Member
540 posts
Gallery: 86 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 1301
Joined Apr 2019
Location: Marmora ON Canada
     
Dec 19, 2019 09:25 as a reply to  @ jcothron's post |  #5616

In Finland we didn't have any trespassing laws. Railway tracks made great access routes. You could walk or ski anywhere you wanted to, on anybody's land. Only for a reason would access be limited, such as you couldn't walk on fields that had been planted.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jcothron
Goldmember
Avatar
3,793 posts
Gallery: 398 photos
Likes: 10390
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Gainesville, GA
     
Dec 19, 2019 09:28 |  #5617

unclejohn wrote in post #18977533 (external link)
In Finland we didn't have any trespassing laws. Railway tracks made great access routes. You could walk or ski anywhere you wanted to, on anybody's land. Only for a reason would access be limited, such as you couldn't walk on fields that had been planted.


A lot of common sense in that, along with the common sense idea of getting away when a train is coming lol


John
Gear List|My Flickr (external link)|Website (external link)|
Instagram (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Inspeqtor
afraid the TF would get bad ideas for me
Avatar
9,245 posts
Gallery: 93 photos
Likes: 2831
Joined Mar 2008
Location: Elkhart, Indiana
     
Dec 19, 2019 09:35 |  #5618

jcothron wrote in post #18977529 (external link)
Thank you, and I likely will. From my perspective I didn't really read those comments as being anything about my personal safety but more along the lines of "how dare you do something so stupid while breaking the law at the same time". Those aren't the words, but it felt pretty close to that. That lead me to feeling like I needed to defend my "shot" as it were since the implication wasn't true on either account.

You know, I see shots of tigers and lions with a full face view of a look that says "I'm about to eat you". Now personally I can't imagine myself being in those positions to get a shot like that (even cropped if so) and to ME it doesn't look very safe. I don't feel the need to point it out to the person that took the shot. I'm sure that in most cases the shooter took precautions and evaluated the environment then decided they could get the shot without undue risk to personal injury. I may or may not have made the same decision and I can't know that because I wasn't there.... but I shouldn't assume they didn't.

I watched a guy in Grand Teton National Park approaching a grizzly with cubs nearby (I was in a vehicle on the road). Now personally I thought... "this guy is crazy for doing that" even though the grizzly was 70 yards or so away from him. I drove on and learned there was an attack in that area with injuries involved. Same guy? I have no idea but in my opinion those situations are pretty dangerous being the animal has thoughts of its on, likely contradictory to the person trying to get a close shot.

Anyone that follows me at all knows I shoot waterfalls, lots of waterfalls. I've watched people decide to climb (or try) a waterfall...slick rocks and all.... only to come tumbling back down on their head. In a specific case I recommended against the activity, and ended up jogging the better part of a mile to get a signal to call 911. He fell on his head. Still, I shoot waterfalls but it is VERY rare for me to climb them and even the vantage points I get at times involve some danger... in which I'm very deliberate in my movements to the point of testing traction, kicking rocks to make sure they don't move...and once getting set not moving my feet at all while getting the shot. Tough on the knees at times but I'm 52 and "knock on wood" have managed to stay completely injury free in my pursuits.

The most likely danger I faced while taking that train shot was tripping over a broken piece of railroad tie and hitting my head on a rock or something.

Now to be clear, I know very little about trains... and I have no direct knowledge of flagging or rail clamping. I do have a good knowledge of engineering however so when I say that switch is in operable :

1. I mean the huge lock that exists on the portion that "slides" to move the rails in effect keeps those rails from sliding...thereby making it impossible for a train to get onto the abandoned spur unless that lock is removed and the switch is actuated.
2. I also know, that because there are two sets of rails... a train traveling on the set of rails not connected to the spur at all makes it all but impossible for the same train to get onto the spur even if the switch were activated

So from a risk standpoint, it would take a catastrophic failure to result in that train coming my way.... such as it derailing. In fact that is the only way I could see that train ending up where I was standing or anywhere close to it. That IS a real risk... those things happen. The same risk you might be taking if you are standing 30 feet away from the track itself and taking a shot as the train passes of which I'm sure there are many examples of shots like that.

While I haven't (or intend to) look up the statistics I suspect that risk would be somewhere in the range of a plane crash, getting struck by lightening, getting run over by a car in a parking lot, or being involved in an auto accident. Actually I suspect some of those examples are far more likely.

You can look at an image and make assumptions but it's probably more prudent in most cases to not let your internal dialogue leak because it is probably your assumptions are incorrect. I mean if we are concerned about safety we could say something like "wow, are you sure you feel safe standing there?" which is significantly less abrasive and probably results in the same explanation without the condescending tones.

Enough about that though... I need to get to work on editing my video taken through a windshield at 130mph (believe me I'm joking) :)

John,

Perhaps I was too harsh with you, and if I was I do apologize.

I did not know the rail you were on was no longer being used. I have heard many stories of people being hit by trains coming from behind them they they did not hear was one of the reasons I said anything to you. Also many people do not know standing on a railroad track is trespassing.

I was only trying to make sure you were educated on these types of scenarios so you would not be injured or worse at a later date.


Charles
Canon EOS 90D * Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM* Flickr Account (external link)
Tokina AT-X Pro DX 11-20 f/2.8 * Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 DC Macro OS * Sigma 150-600 f5-6.3 APO DG OS HSM Contemporary
Canon 18-55 IS Kit Lens * Canon 70-300 IS USM * Canon 50mm f1.8 * Canon 580EX II

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jcothron
Goldmember
Avatar
3,793 posts
Gallery: 398 photos
Likes: 10390
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Gainesville, GA
     
Dec 19, 2019 09:53 |  #5619

Inspeqtor wrote in post #18977540 (external link)
John,

Perhaps I was too harsh with you, and if I was I do apologize.

I did not know the rail you were on was no longer being used. I have heard many stories of people being hit by trains coming from behind them they they did not hear was one of the reasons I said anything to you. Also many people do not know standing on a railroad track is trespassing.

I was only trying to make sure you were educated on these types of scenarios so you would not be injured or worse at a later date.


Charles,

Understood and I DO appreciate your concern..no hard feelings at all. Perhaps I should have included more about the shot when posting and I will try to be cognizant of that in the future. Rest assured though if you see a train shot from me, I will NOT be standing on an active track as it is coming. :)


John
Gear List|My Flickr (external link)|Website (external link)|
Instagram (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Terry ­ McDaniel
Goldmember
Avatar
1,060 posts
Gallery: 533 photos
Likes: 3073
Joined Sep 2014
Location: Lebanon, OK
     
Dec 19, 2019 12:55 |  #5620

Safety around tracks is a big topic. If you've been following the UP Big Boy page on facebook you've seen a lot of stupid people. When the engineer has to lean out of the cab with a bullhorn telling folks to get off the tracks as he's approaching, maybe it's time to thin the herd.

I watched a video of a lady photographing one of the big UP steam engines ( I think it was 844) from too close. She paid with her life. The fireman will pay with nightmares for the rest of his life. You don't unsee things like that.

A former coworker was very experienced around switching yards. One day, as an empty chip car was approaching from a downhill roll he noticed the coupling knuckle was closed on the standing car. He did get the knuckle open, just in time to be coupled between the cars. He was a really nice guy.

One often overlooking danger is banding and strapping that were not properly removed after a railcar has been unloaded. A twenty foot piece of steel banding dangling from a closed boxcar door can remove your head from it's shoulders if the train is going very fast. That's one reason for the 25 foot rule.

I came very close to killing a co-worker in the shipping dept where I worked. He was from another dept and had shipped out a car without cleaning it. He came to our dept to clean it out. We were preparing for a switch and I had to close all the open doors. Not knowing he was in the car, I started pushing the door closed with my forktruck. As the door is closing he sticks his head out to see why. Fortunately for both of us the bearings on the door wheels were very rusty and the door stopped when I stopped. If the door had been freewheeling like it was supposed to he would have been killed. This happened before we instituted lockout procedures before entering a boxcar.

As a kid I suppose I violated a lot of rules around tracks. We lived near a switching yard and were always playing around the cars. Climb up on top of them, crawl under, etc. One day we found a car that had been loaded with sulfur and not cleaned out very well. We got a bunch of it, used it for making blackpowder. Kids making their own blackpowder should probably be pretty high on the list of stupid things. And we burned a lot of it just to watch it burn.

Not sure what any of this has to do with photography, just wanted to share.


TerryMc
"The .44 spoke,
It spit lead and smoke,
And 17 inches of flame."
Marty Robbins

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
hammer418
Goldmember
Avatar
2,217 posts
Gallery: 36 photos
Likes: 1258
Joined Feb 2008
Location: Indianapolis, IN USA
     
Dec 19, 2019 16:30 |  #5621

jcothron wrote in post #18977529 (external link)
Thank you, and I likely will. From my perspective I didn't really read those comments as being anything about my personal safety but more along the lines of "how dare you do something so stupid while breaking the law at the same time". Those aren't the words, but it felt pretty close to that. That lead me to feeling like I needed to defend my "shot" as it were since the implication wasn't true on either account.

You know, I see shots of tigers and lions with a full face view of a look that says "I'm about to eat you". Now personally I can't imagine myself being in those positions to get a shot like that (even cropped if so) and to ME it doesn't look very safe. I don't feel the need to point it out to the person that took the shot. I'm sure that in most cases the shooter took precautions and evaluated the environment then decided they could get the shot without undue risk to personal injury. I may or may not have made the same decision and I can't know that because I wasn't there.... but I shouldn't assume they didn't.

I watched a guy in Grand Teton National Park approaching a grizzly with cubs nearby (I was in a vehicle on the road). Now personally I thought... "this guy is crazy for doing that" even though the grizzly was 70 yards or so away from him. I drove on and learned there was an attack in that area with injuries involved. Same guy? I have no idea but in my opinion those situations are pretty dangerous being the animal has thoughts of its on, likely contradictory to the person trying to get a close shot.

Anyone that follows me at all knows I shoot waterfalls, lots of waterfalls. I've watched people decide to climb (or try) a waterfall...slick rocks and all.... only to come tumbling back down on their head. In a specific case I recommended against the activity, and ended up jogging the better part of a mile to get a signal to call 911. He fell on his head. Still, I shoot waterfalls but it is VERY rare for me to climb them and even the vantage points I get at times involve some danger... in which I'm very deliberate in my movements to the point of testing traction, kicking rocks to make sure they don't move...and once getting set not moving my feet at all while getting the shot. Tough on the knees at times but I'm 52 and "knock on wood" have managed to stay completely injury free in my pursuits.

The most likely danger I faced while taking that train shot was tripping over a broken piece of railroad tie and hitting my head on a rock or something.

Now to be clear, I know very little about trains... and I have no direct knowledge of flagging or rail clamping. I do have a good knowledge of engineering however so when I say that switch is in operable :

1. I mean the huge lock that exists on the portion that "slides" to move the rails in effect keeps those rails from sliding...thereby making it impossible for a train to get onto the abandoned spur unless that lock is removed and the switch is actuated.
2. I also know, that because there are two sets of rails... a train traveling on the set of rails not connected to the spur at all makes it all but impossible for the same train to get onto the spur even if the switch were activated

So from a risk standpoint, it would take a catastrophic failure to result in that train coming my way.... such as it derailing. In fact that is the only way I could see that train ending up where I was standing or anywhere close to it. That IS a real risk... those things happen. The same risk you might be taking if you are standing 30 feet away from the track itself and taking a shot as the train passes of which I'm sure there are many examples of shots like that.

While I haven't (or intend to) look up the statistics I suspect that risk would be somewhere in the range of a plane crash, getting struck by lightening, getting run over by a car in a parking lot, or being involved in an auto accident. Actually I suspect some of those examples are far more likely.

You can look at an image and make assumptions but it's probably more prudent in most cases to not let your internal dialogue leak because it is probably your assumptions are incorrect. I mean if we are concerned about safety we could say something like "wow, are you sure you feel safe standing there?" which is significantly less abrasive and probably results in the same explanation without the condescending tones.

Enough about that though... I need to get to work on editing my video taken through a windshield at 130mph (believe me I'm joking) :)

You express yourself very well, and I'm glad that you took the time to defend yourself. Keep shooting, and keep managing your own risks. I hope that others have learned from your post ! <thumbsup>




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Itsed65
Goldmember
Avatar
4,194 posts
Gallery: 1809 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 43376
Joined Jan 2010
Location: Hercules, CA
     
Dec 19, 2019 22:38 |  #5622

IMAGE: https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49240074648_053732af8a_h.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/2i2b​fGh  (external link)
Runaround in the Rain (external link) by lennycarl08 (external link), on Flickr

Fuji XT-2, XT-3, Sony A7RIV, A9 and RX10 MK IV
My Flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Inspeqtor
afraid the TF would get bad ideas for me
Avatar
9,245 posts
Gallery: 93 photos
Likes: 2831
Joined Mar 2008
Location: Elkhart, Indiana
     
Dec 19, 2019 22:53 |  #5623

Terry McDaniel wrote in post #18977617 (external link)
Safety around tracks is a big topic. If you've been following the UP Big Boy page on facebook you've seen a lot of stupid people. When the engineer has to lean out of the cab with a bullhorn telling folks to get off the tracks as he's approaching, maybe it's time to thin the herd.

I watched a video of a lady photographing one of the big UP steam engines ( I think it was 844) from too close. She paid with her life. The fireman will pay with nightmares for the rest of his life. You don't unsee things like that.

A former coworker was very experienced around switching yards. One day, as an empty chip car was approaching from a downhill roll he noticed the coupling knuckle was closed on the standing car. He did get the knuckle open, just in time to be coupled between the cars. He was a really nice guy.

One often overlooking danger is banding and strapping that were not properly removed after a railcar has been unloaded. A twenty foot piece of steel banding dangling from a closed boxcar door can remove your head from it's shoulders if the train is going very fast. That's one reason for the 25 foot rule.

I came very close to killing a co-worker in the shipping dept where I worked. He was from another dept and had shipped out a car without cleaning it. He came to our dept to clean it out. We were preparing for a switch and I had to close all the open doors. Not knowing he was in the car, I started pushing the door closed with my forktruck. As the door is closing he sticks his head out to see why. Fortunately for both of us the bearings on the door wheels were very rusty and the door stopped when I stopped. If the door had been freewheeling like it was supposed to he would have been killed. This happened before we instituted lockout procedures before entering a boxcar.

As a kid I suppose I violated a lot of rules around tracks. We lived near a switching yard and were always playing around the cars. Climb up on top of them, crawl under, etc. One day we found a car that had been loaded with sulfur and not cleaned out very well. We got a bunch of it, used it for making blackpowder. Kids making their own blackpowder should probably be pretty high on the list of stupid things. And we burned a lot of it just to watch it burn.

Not sure what any of this has to do with photography, just wanted to share.

Thank you for helping us with your knowledge. My father was a railroader for 33 years with New York Central / Penn Central. I really have very little knowledge compared with what you and many others have shared here on this forum.


Charles
Canon EOS 90D * Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM* Flickr Account (external link)
Tokina AT-X Pro DX 11-20 f/2.8 * Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 DC Macro OS * Sigma 150-600 f5-6.3 APO DG OS HSM Contemporary
Canon 18-55 IS Kit Lens * Canon 70-300 IS USM * Canon 50mm f1.8 * Canon 580EX II

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Ltdave
it looks like im post #19,016
3,733 posts
Gallery: 24 photos
Likes: 2621
Joined Apr 2012
Location: the farthest point east in michigan
     
Dec 20, 2019 00:15 |  #5624


is this a Bcol (BC railroad) locomotive?




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
laksht
Member
133 posts
Likes: 231
Joined Aug 2018
Post edited 6 months ago by laksht.
     
Dec 20, 2019 11:12 |  #5625

Being a rail fan now for over 3 decades have seen a fair share of unpleasant things.

But there is no question on rail fan safety, there is no way any human has won against a train so far.

I have always advocated rail fan safety as a train photographer and always believe with trains you never have a second chance.

I am a member of the Indian Railways Fan Club and we give our safety advisory often to members to be careful around the tracks while shooting videos or stills.

You can visit our rail fan site at www.irfca.org (external link)

My train photos are here

https://flickr.com/pho​tos/lakshmant/ (external link)

Laksh




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

1,823,534 views & 11,390 likes for this thread
Post Your Best Train Shot......
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Transportation 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is symphonyevents
831 guests, 218 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.