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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 21 Jul 2020 (Tuesday) 05:25
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Another Neowise image

 
sploo
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Jul 21, 2020 05:25 |  #1

Lots of good comet Neowise images on here already, but here's another (from last night in the UK).


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PSteven
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Jul 21, 2020 05:39 |  #2

sploo wrote in post #19096630 (external link)
Lots of good comet Neowise images on here already, but here's another (from last night in the UK).

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Hosted photo: posted by sploo in
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forum: Astronomy & Celestial


That is fabulous! Care to share your set up details? Lens, settings etc




  
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Jul 21, 2020 10:17 |  #3

PSteven wrote in post #19096635 (external link)
That is fabulous! Care to share your set up details? Lens, settings etc

Thanks. It was a Canon 5D4 with the 100-400II at 400mm, f/5.6, mounted on a Skywatcher StarAdventurer, with 10s exposures at ISO 3200.

I took 24 shots (so 240s of exposure time in total) and stacked using DeepSkyStacker. That probably wasn't critical for this, but it does improve the signal to noise a bit.

It's cropped from a landscape orientation to portrait, but the vertical is the full image height at the 400mm focal length.

Based on the above, it might well be possible to get the same result with a 70-200 f/2.8 at 200mm and f/2.8, ISO3200, and 2s exposures without a tracking mount.


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Jul 21, 2020 10:27 as a reply to  @ sploo's post |  #4

Thank you very much for sharing the details of your amazing photo. I will give this a try tonight with my 70-200 lens and report back tomorrow with the results.




  
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Jul 21, 2020 11:19 |  #5

Great photo, now compare that to my photo which was a single shot at 4000ISO for 5 seconds on a basic ball head tripod. The older 100-400mm L lens f/5.3 at 310mm on a 5D MkIII.

Yours is much better.


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Canon 5D MKIII | Canon 50mm f/1.8 II | Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM | Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM | Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM | Tamron 24-70 mm F2.8 VC USD | Canon Speedlite 430EX II
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sploo
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Jul 21, 2020 17:43 |  #6

cainey wrote in post #19096751 (external link)
Great photo, now compare that to my photo which was a single shot at 4000ISO for 5 seconds on a basic ball head tripod. The older 100-400mm L lens f/5.3 at 310mm on a 5D MkIII.

Yours is much better.


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./showthread.php?p=190​96751&i=i71375465
forum: Astronomy & Celestial

That's really not bad at all. The stars have a little streaking in them due to the exposure time and focal length (which will also be blurring the comet), but it's clearly a comet, and the colour is good.

It's a much criticized "rule", but 500 divided by the focal length is useful for calculating max (untracked) exposure times. E.g. 500 / 310 = ~1.6s max exposure time without streaking.

Take 50+ raw images with that exposure time (and no changes to your other settings) then stack the resulting images with DeepSkyStacker; you'll likely find the results will be pretty good.

No chance for me to try again tonight; 100% cloud unfortunately.


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Jul 21, 2020 20:02 as a reply to  @ sploo's post |  #7

Thanks for the advice. I do need more experience in this area of photography and this event has piqued my interest so I'm starting to look at doing this properly.


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Post edited 11 months ago by PSteven.
     
Jul 22, 2020 02:01 |  #8

I drove to Exmoor which is a dark sky area but it was a bit cloudy/hazy so the comet wasn't as clear as the night before in my garden. Also I took my 16-35mm lens - thinking it was 2.8 but I was mistaken. This is a single exposure - I did take about 10 of the same setup with 1 second intervals so will try and stack it later. The comet is a bit insignificant:)

I notice my ISO is a lot lower than others but when I increased the ISO everything looked overexposed. Not sure what I needed to do to improve things


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Jul 22, 2020 03:49 |  #9

PSteven wrote in post #19097085 (external link)
I drove to Exmoor which is a dark sky area but it was a bit cloudy/hazy so the comet wasn't as clear as the night before in my garden. Also I took my 16-35mm lens - thinking it was 2.8 but I was mistaken. This is a single exposure - I did take about 10 of the same setup with 1 second intervals so will try and stack it later. The comet is a bit insignificant:)

I notice my ISO is a lot lower than others but when I increased the ISO everything looked overexposed. Not sure what I needed to do to improve things
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That's a great image. I really like shots where there's also some foreground/ground interest; it's something I've always struggled to do.

As for the ISO; if my dodgy maths is right, your ISO 1000 vs my ISO 3200 just about cancels out your 3x longer exposure, so with your f/4 vs my f/5.6 I'd expect the exact same image to be about twice as bright at 30s, f/4, ISO 1000 vs 10s, f/5.6, ISO 3200. You're also actually collecting more light; whereas the higher ISO I used is just amplifying the sensor signal (which will also amplify noise).

Obviously we weren't taking the exact same image, and it depends on the time of night (it looks as though you've got a little bit of light left in the sky). Also, if you drove to Exmoor then you'll have much less light pollution than where I shot.


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Jul 22, 2020 04:45 |  #10

sploo wrote in post #19097122 (external link)
That's a great image. I really like shots where there's also some foreground/ground interest; it's something I've always struggled to do.

As for the ISO; if my dodgy maths is right, your ISO 1000 vs my ISO 3200 just about cancels out your 3x longer exposure, so with your f/4 vs my f/5.6 I'd expect the exact same image to be about twice as bright at 30s, f/4, ISO 1000 vs 10s, f/5.6, ISO 3200. You're also actually collecting more light; whereas the higher ISO I used is just amplifying the sensor signal (which will also amplify noise).

Obviously we weren't taking the exact same image, and it depends on the time of night (it looks as though you've got a little bit of light left in the sky). Also, if you drove to Exmoor then you'll have much less light pollution than where I shot.

Thank you for the feedback and also for the explanation of the maths. I took my shot around 11.30 at night so there shouldn't have been much light left in the sky but there sure looks like there is light coming from the bottom right area which is kind of around where the sun set. I drove to Exmoor to try and add an interesting foreground object (Dunkery Beacon) and also because Exmoor is supposed to be a recognised dark sky area. As the camera was on a timer I couldn't resist to get myself into a shot:)

I read that 22nd July was the last night to see the comet - is that true? It doesn't look too promising on the cloudy front tonight if it is going to make an appearance tonight.




  
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Jul 22, 2020 05:54 |  #11

PSteven wrote in post #19097136 (external link)
Thank you for the feedback and also for the explanation of the maths. I took my shot around 11.30 at night so there shouldn't have been much light left in the sky but there sure looks like there is light coming from the bottom right area which is kind of around where the sun set. I drove to Exmoor to try and add an interesting foreground object (Dunkery Beacon) and also because Exmoor is supposed to be a recognised dark sky area. As the camera was on a timer I couldn't resist to get myself into a shot:)

I read that 22nd July was the last night to see the comet - is that true? It doesn't look too promising on the cloudy front tonight if it is going to make an appearance tonight.

At this time of the year it doesn't get "astro dark" until after midnight; see here https://www.ukweatherc​ams.co.uk/sunrise_suns​et_times.php (external link) and select Exeter.

I think Neowise should be visible until around the end of this month; clouds permitting!


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Post edited 11 months ago by PSteven.
     
Jul 22, 2020 05:58 |  #12

sploo wrote in post #19097162 (external link)
At this time of the year it doesn't get "astro dark" until after midnight; see here https://www.ukweatherc​ams.co.uk/sunrise_suns​et_times.php (external link) and select Exeter.

I think Neowise should be visible until around the end of this month; clouds permitting!

Aha that would explain it then. I prob should have hung around another hour or so but it is kind of spooky standing at the top of Exmoor on your own at midnight lol

Thanks for the link - that is really useful for future reference and interesting to learn this

I am guessing if I had taken my shot when it was "astro dark" I would not have seen the silhouette of the beacon or myself?




  
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Post edited 11 months ago by sploo.
     
Jul 22, 2020 06:32 |  #13

PSteven wrote in post #19097163 (external link)
Aha that would explain it then. I prob should have hung around another hour or so but it is kind of spooky standing at the top of Exmoor on your own at midnight lol

Thanks for the link - that is really useful for future reference and interesting to learn this

I am guessing if I had taken my shot when it was "astro dark" I would not have seen the silhouette of the beacon or myself?

Good question - I don't know!

Something was casting light onto the side of the beacon facing the camera, so unless you had a light source then I guess it would have been the last bit of ambient light from the sun (given that there's no bright moon at the moment).

EDIT: for the silhouette; yes I guess if the sky were completely inky black then it would have been harder to see even the dark shape of yourself


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Jul 22, 2020 07:36 |  #14

sploo wrote in post #19097180 (external link)
Good question - I don't know!

Something was casting light onto the side of the beacon facing the camera, so unless you had a light source then I guess it would have been the last bit of ambient light from the sun (given that there's no bright moon at the moment).

EDIT: for the silhouette; yes I guess if the sky were completely inky black then it would have been harder to see even the dark shape of yourself

Thank you again. I didn't have any light source so it must have been ambient light.

With regards the silhouette I am glad I didn't go when it was "astro dark" then as the whole reason was to get the beacon in the foreground. I suppose I could have taken a flash light tho to light the beacon from the front if it was totally astro dark, a technique I would need to experiment with.

Shame it is getting cloudy today




  
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Another Neowise image
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