Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Wildlife 
Thread started 02 Apr 2021 (Friday) 06:49
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Cheetah Kill (not for sensitive viewers)

 
Jorgac
Senior Member
Avatar
995 posts
Gallery: 50 photos
Best ofs: 20
Likes: 10719
Joined Sep 2013
Location: Durban, South Africa
Post edited 5 months ago by Jorgac.
     
Apr 02, 2021 06:49 |  #1

A coalition of 5 cheetahs killed a zebra foal shortly before a spectacular sunrise. Captured in the south-western part of the Free State Province, South Africa.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Name is Charles

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
i-G12
Wat?
Avatar
2,290 posts
Gallery: 189 photos
Likes: 1867
Joined Feb 2011
Location: Seattle, WA
     
Apr 02, 2021 19:45 |  #2

Jorgac wrote in post #19217426 (external link)
A coalition of 5 cheetahs killed a zebra foal shortly before a spectacular sunrise. Captured in the south-western part of the Free State Province, South Africa.
thumbnail
Hosted photo: posted by Jorgac in
./showthread.php?p=192​17426&i=i206863878
forum: Wildlife

Super shot!!!




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jcothron
Goldmember
Avatar
4,258 posts
Gallery: 416 photos
Likes: 13185
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Gainesville, GA
     
Apr 02, 2021 20:45 |  #3

That’s a wonderful shot but I have to ask how you captured that with a 16-35?! You had to be pretty close.


John
Gear List|My Flickr (external link)|Website (external link)|
Instagram (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mathogre
Goldmember
Avatar
3,792 posts
Gallery: 117 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 1134
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Oakton, VA USA
     
Apr 02, 2021 22:38 |  #4

jcothron wrote in post #19217692 (external link)
That’s a wonderful shot but I have to ask how you captured that with a 16-35?! You had to be pretty close.

And it was at 16mm.

To the OP, it's a gorgeous photo! My "sensitivity" is about being so close to a Breakfast Bunch Coalition, and then only because I wouldn't care to be an early lunch item. I'm assuming you and your friend(s) were in a vehicle with a cutout through a door or side panel that is as close to the ground (vehicle floorpan) as possible.

Great photo! I would not want to mess with that cheetah.


Graham
Canon A BIG ONE A Small One An itty bitty one
My Photo Collection (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Jorgac
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
995 posts
Gallery: 50 photos
Best ofs: 20
Likes: 10719
Joined Sep 2013
Location: Durban, South Africa
Post edited 5 months ago by Jorgac.
     
Apr 03, 2021 02:01 |  #5

jcothron wrote in post #19217692 (external link)
That’s a wonderful shot but I have to ask how you captured that with a 16-35?! You had to be pretty close.

mathogre wrote in post #19217722 (external link)
And it was at 16mm.

To the OP, it's a gorgeous photo! My "sensitivity" is about being so close to a Breakfast Bunch Coalition, and then only because I wouldn't care to be an early lunch item. I'm assuming you and your friend(s) were in a vehicle with a cutout through a door or side panel that is as close to the ground (vehicle floorpan) as possible.

Great photo! I would not want to mess with that cheetah.

Thank you both! You're quite right - I was pretty close and I was actually on foot. Let me give you a bit of background info on this: These cheetahs have become quite comfortable with humans as long as they (the humans) make no sudden movements and they take their cue from the cats themselves. These particular cats have never had a reason to see humans as a threat. I spent quite a few hours with them the previous afternoon and shortly before sunset I walked with them on their hunt for about 2 to 3 km's stopping intermittently to take shots of them (with a 70-200mm) as and when good photographic opportunities presented themselves. Eventually I ran out of light so called it a day. We were hoping to find them the next morning and, with a bit of luck, get to see them make a kill. We were quite lucky and found them after driving in the area we thought they'd be in for only approx. 20 minutes but they'd already killed the zebra foal and three of them had already gorged themselves and were lying around spread quite far apart digesting their meals ( a cheetah can eat up to 10 kg's of meat in one sitting). Approaching on foot, these cats were very relaxed. As mentioned earlier, you take your cue from the animal. If it feels you're getting too close you get a hiss and sometimes a paw-stomp on the ground from the animal to tell you its uncomfortable and you're getting too close. If that happens you back off and respect the animal's space.

The 2 cats still eating were not at all worried about my presence so I put on the 16-35mm and approached closer very slowly (under the watchful eye of my guide). At no stage did the cats give any signals that they were concerned so I ended up pretty close - what an experience! I would definitely not do this with any of the other large cat species such as lions or leopards as that would most certainly end up very badly for all parties. I would also not recommend this unless you are in the presence of a guide who knows the animals well. I have photographed cheetahs on foot on a few occasions before so also have a bit of experience with this which, like in most cases, helps a lot. This was my first time photographing them on a kill on foot. Cheetahs are generally not dangerous to man so I was not very concerned for my safety and if at any stage the guide was concerned, the experience would have been ended anyway. So that's the backstory. It rates with some of my most exhilarating experiences I've shared with wildlife and I've still got quite a few images to get through so will post a few others soon.


Name is Charles

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
i-G12
Wat?
Avatar
2,290 posts
Gallery: 189 photos
Likes: 1867
Joined Feb 2011
Location: Seattle, WA
     
Apr 03, 2021 05:00 |  #6

Jorgac wrote in post #19217769 (external link)
Thank you both! You're quite right - I was pretty close and I was actually on foot. Let me give you a bit of background info on this: These cheetahs have become quite comfortable with humans as long as they (the humans) make no sudden movements and they take their cue from the cats themselves. These particular cats have never had a reason to see humans as a threat. I spent quite a few hours with them the previous afternoon and shortly before sunset I walked with them on their hunt for about 2 to 3 km's stopping intermittently to take shots of them (with a 70-200mm) as and when good photographic opportunities presented themselves. Eventually I ran out of light so called it a day. We were hoping to find them the next morning and, with a bit of luck, get to see them make a kill. We were quite lucky and found them after driving in the area we thought they'd be in for only approx. 20 minutes but they'd already killed the zebra foal and three of them had already gorged themselves and were lying around spread quite far apart digesting their meals ( a cheetah can eat up to 10 kg's of meat in one sitting). Approaching on foot, these cats were very relaxed. As mentioned earlier, you take your cue from the animal. If it feels you're getting too close you get a hiss and sometimes a paw-stomp on the ground from the animal to tell you its uncomfortable and you're getting too close. If that happens you back off and respect the animal's space.

The 2 cats still eating were not at all worried about my presence so I put on the 16-35mm and approached closer very slowly (under the watchful eye of my guide). At no stage did the cats give any signals that they were concerned so I ended up pretty close - what an experience! I would definitely not do this with any of the other large cat species such as lions or leopards as that would most certainly end up very badly for all parties. I would also not recommend this unless you are in the presence of a guide who knows the animals well. I have photographed cheetahs on foot on a few occasions before so also have a bit of experience with this which, like in most cases, helps a lot. This was my first time photographing them on a kill on foot. Cheetahs are generally not dangerous to man so I was not very concerned for my safety and if at any stage the guide was concerned, the experience would have been ended anyway. So that's the backstory. It rates with some of my most exhilarating experiences I've shared with wildlife and I've still got quite a few images to get through so will post a few others soon.

WOW. Just WOW. That is an incredible story Jorgac and must have been an experience of a lifetime.

I've been very close to lions and leopards when in the vehicle. So close I could have easily reached out and touched them but of course you stay very still as they walk by. Here s one leopard that walked right by the side of our vehicle. I couldn't have been more than a foot away from him when he walked by. The adrenaline really pumps hard in those kinds of situations.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Jorgac
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
995 posts
Gallery: 50 photos
Best ofs: 20
Likes: 10719
Joined Sep 2013
Location: Durban, South Africa
     
Apr 03, 2021 05:06 |  #7

i-G12 wrote in post #19217804 (external link)
WOW. Just WOW. That is an incredible story Jorgac and must have been an experience of a lifetime.

I've been very close to lions and leopards when in the vehicle. So close I could have easily reached out and touched them but of course you stay very still as they walk by. Here s one leopard that walked right by the side of our vehicle. I couldn't have been more than a foot away from him when he walked by. The adrenaline really pumps hard in those kinds of situations.

thumbnail
Hosted photo: posted by i-G12 in
./showthread.php?p=192​17804&i=i12076633
forum: Wildlife

That's a great shot. It really is great to get close to animals like this. I'm glad to say that although I'm fortunate enough to do this quite often it always gets my heart beating faster.


Name is Charles

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Jorgac
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
995 posts
Gallery: 50 photos
Best ofs: 20
Likes: 10719
Joined Sep 2013
Location: Durban, South Africa
     
Apr 03, 2021 07:49 |  #8

Tucking in for the meal


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Name is Charles

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Jorgac
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
995 posts
Gallery: 50 photos
Best ofs: 20
Likes: 10719
Joined Sep 2013
Location: Durban, South Africa
     
Apr 03, 2021 07:59 |  #9

A very full belly


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Name is Charles

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mathogre
Goldmember
Avatar
3,792 posts
Gallery: 117 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 1134
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Oakton, VA USA
     
Apr 03, 2021 12:22 |  #10

Jorgac wrote in post #19217769 (external link)
Thank you both! You're quite right - I was pretty close and I was actually on foot. Let me give you a bit of background info on this: These cheetahs have become quite comfortable with humans as long as they (the humans) make no sudden movements and they take their cue from the cats themselves. These particular cats have never had a reason to see humans as a threat. I spent quite a few hours with them the previous afternoon and shortly before sunset I walked with them on their hunt for about 2 to 3 km's stopping intermittently to take shots of them (with a 70-200mm) as and when good photographic opportunities presented themselves. Eventually I ran out of light so called it a day. We were hoping to find them the next morning and, with a bit of luck, get to see them make a kill. We were quite lucky and found them after driving in the area we thought they'd be in for only approx. 20 minutes but they'd already killed the zebra foal and three of them had already gorged themselves and were lying around spread quite far apart digesting their meals ( a cheetah can eat up to 10 kg's of meat in one sitting). Approaching on foot, these cats were very relaxed. As mentioned earlier, you take your cue from the animal. If it feels you're getting too close you get a hiss and sometimes a paw-stomp on the ground from the animal to tell you its uncomfortable and you're getting too close. If that happens you back off and respect the animal's space.

The 2 cats still eating were not at all worried about my presence so I put on the 16-35mm and approached closer very slowly (under the watchful eye of my guide). At no stage did the cats give any signals that they were concerned so I ended up pretty close - what an experience! I would definitely not do this with any of the other large cat species such as lions or leopards as that would most certainly end up very badly for all parties. I would also not recommend this unless you are in the presence of a guide who knows the animals well. I have photographed cheetahs on foot on a few occasions before so also have a bit of experience with this which, like in most cases, helps a lot. This was my first time photographing them on a kill on foot. Cheetahs are generally not dangerous to man so I was not very concerned for my safety and if at any stage the guide was concerned, the experience would have been ended anyway. So that's the backstory. It rates with some of my most exhilarating experiences I've shared with wildlife and I've still got quite a few images to get through so will post a few others soon.

Wow! Just wow!

This is actually consistent with what I think I know about cheetahs and other large cats. While I still think it takes stainless steel cojones to do what you did, I also understand the relationships between cheetahs and adult humans, and that the situation was not as high risk as it might seem, given you were working with a guide and you knew the danger signs. That would not be possible with other large cats; were it a lion, you might get one photo, and it would likely be your last. As an aside for others thinking cheetahs might be tame, they are still wild, they are killers, and while they might respect adult humans, a child human can look like an appetizer to them.

These are fantastic photos. Thank you so much for sharing them. Amazing.


Graham
Canon A BIG ONE A Small One An itty bitty one
My Photo Collection (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mathogre
Goldmember
Avatar
3,792 posts
Gallery: 117 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 1134
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Oakton, VA USA
     
Apr 03, 2021 12:30 |  #11

Jorgac, two other items.

1. i-G12 and I started our most recent responses with the same reaction. I was not trying to copy, but it seemed only the natural thing to say. It was after posting I realized we'd said the same thing.

2. These are truly fantastic photos. They are worthy of being in a nature publication. I do hope you at least print these for yourself/family, whether for a frame, a wall, or a one-off photo book. Your family and friends should see these.


Graham
Canon A BIG ONE A Small One An itty bitty one
My Photo Collection (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jcothron
Goldmember
Avatar
4,258 posts
Gallery: 416 photos
Likes: 13185
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Gainesville, GA
     
Apr 03, 2021 12:34 |  #12

Jorgac wrote in post #19217769 (external link)
Thank you both! You're quite right - I was pretty close and I was actually on foot. Let me give you a bit of background info on this: These cheetahs have become quite comfortable with humans as long as they (the humans) make no sudden movements and they take their cue from the cats themselves. These particular cats have never had a reason to see humans as a threat. I spent quite a few hours with them the previous afternoon and shortly before sunset I walked with them on their hunt for about 2 to 3 km's stopping intermittently to take shots of them (with a 70-200mm) as and when good photographic opportunities presented themselves. Eventually I ran out of light so called it a day. We were hoping to find them the next morning and, with a bit of luck, get to see them make a kill. We were quite lucky and found them after driving in the area we thought they'd be in for only approx. 20 minutes but they'd already killed the zebra foal and three of them had already gorged themselves and were lying around spread quite far apart digesting their meals ( a cheetah can eat up to 10 kg's of meat in one sitting). Approaching on foot, these cats were very relaxed. As mentioned earlier, you take your cue from the animal. If it feels you're getting too close you get a hiss and sometimes a paw-stomp on the ground from the animal to tell you its uncomfortable and you're getting too close. If that happens you back off and respect the animal's space.

The 2 cats still eating were not at all worried about my presence so I put on the 16-35mm and approached closer very slowly (under the watchful eye of my guide). At no stage did the cats give any signals that they were concerned so I ended up pretty close - what an experience! I would definitely not do this with any of the other large cat species such as lions or leopards as that would most certainly end up very badly for all parties. I would also not recommend this unless you are in the presence of a guide who knows the animals well. I have photographed cheetahs on foot on a few occasions before so also have a bit of experience with this which, like in most cases, helps a lot. This was my first time photographing them on a kill on foot. Cheetahs are generally not dangerous to man so I was not very concerned for my safety and if at any stage the guide was concerned, the experience would have been ended anyway. So that's the backstory. It rates with some of my most exhilarating experiences I've shared with wildlife and I've still got quite a few images to get through so will post a few others soon.

Hats off to you for getting those shots. The wide angle presents a perspective just not possible with a telephoto. As unfamiliar with big cats as I am I’m not sure I could pull that off. I know that comes with experience but it is pretty daunting to someone that does have it. I climb around in streams near waterfalls and people think I’m nuts (perhaps I am) but the ability comes from experience and respect for what Mother Nature is capable of.

Great work!

***Siri capitalized Mother Nature, interesting.


John
Gear List|My Flickr (external link)|Website (external link)|
Instagram (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Jorgac
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
995 posts
Gallery: 50 photos
Best ofs: 20
Likes: 10719
Joined Sep 2013
Location: Durban, South Africa
     
Apr 03, 2021 14:29 |  #13

mathogre wrote in post #19217959 (external link)
Jorgac, two other items.

1. i-G12 and I started our most recent responses with the same reaction. I was not trying to copy, but it seemed only the natural thing to say. It was after posting I realized we'd said the same thing.

2. These are truly fantastic photos. They are worthy of being in a nature publication. I do hope you at least print these for yourself/family, whether for a frame, a wall, or a one-off photo book. Your family and friends should see these.

jcothron wrote in post #19217962 (external link)
Hats off to you for getting those shots. The wide angle presents a perspective just not possible with a telephoto. As unfamiliar with big cats as I am I’m not sure I could pull that off. I know that comes with experience but it is pretty daunting to someone that does have it. I climb around in streams near waterfalls and people think I’m nuts (perhaps I am) but the ability comes from experience and respect for what Mother Nature is capable of.

Great work!

***Siri capitalized Mother Nature, interesting.

Thanks a lot for your comments to both Graham and John. I really do enjoy hearing when my images catch someone’s attention like this and I intend printing some of these, Graham. Keep safe.


Name is Charles

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Perfectly ­ Frank
I'm too sexy for my lens
5,339 posts
Gallery: 99 photos
Likes: 3082
Joined Oct 2010
     
Apr 03, 2021 17:38 |  #14

Amazing photos and background story. Thanks for sharing.


When you see my camera gear you'll think I'm a pro.
When you see my photos you'll know that I'm not.

My best aviation photos (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Dave3222
Goldmember
Avatar
1,421 posts
Gallery: 177 photos
Likes: 789
Joined Jul 2013
     
Apr 03, 2021 19:37 |  #15

Jorgac wrote in post #19217857 (external link)
A very full belly
thumbnail
Hosted photo: posted by Jorgac in
./showthread.php?p=192​17857&i=i263606858
forum: Wildlife

These images are simply incredible. The last shot I swear it looks like the cheetah is actually posing for you. Really great work!




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

1,908 views & 94 likes for this thread
Cheetah Kill (not for sensitive viewers)
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Wildlife 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is Chnojo
649 guests, 181 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.