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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Wildlife 
Thread started 18 Jan 2015 (Sunday) 09:43
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What kind of Wildlife Photographer Are "YOU"

 
SynJohn
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Jul 26, 2021 16:21 |  #2056

Jorgac wrote in post #19264519 (external link)
Photographing Cape buffalo from 10 feet in a hide
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Simply amazing and brave.


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avondale87
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Jul 28, 2021 05:29 |  #2057

a local Bennets wallaby at Middlesex near Cradle Mt


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Snydremark
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Jul 28, 2021 10:47 |  #2058

avondale87 wrote in post #19265214 (external link)
a local Bennets wallaby at Middlesex near Cradle Mt
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Are they just very habituated there or is this someone's pet? It definitely looks curious about the camera :)


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
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KT29
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Jul 28, 2021 12:13 |  #2059

Photo taken at a Wildlife Center display in Wyoming.:-):-)


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Terry --I can now hear the band playing on the Titanic.

  
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OhLook
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Jul 28, 2021 13:08 |  #2060

KT29 wrote in post #19265357 (external link)
Photo taken at a Wildlife Center display in Wyoming.:-):-)
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If that's a diorama, the degree of danger you risked in getting the photo would be about my speed.


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KT29
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Jul 28, 2021 14:00 |  #2061

OhLook wrote in post #19265373 (external link)
If that's a diorama, the degree of danger you risked in getting the photo would be about my speed.

This is a diorama with full-scale taxidermy mounts.:-) I didn't feel any danger other than the risk of taking a poor photo, which I should be used to by now.:lol:


Terry --I can now hear the band playing on the Titanic.

  
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avondale87
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Jul 28, 2021 15:48 |  #2062

Snydremark wrote in post #19265325 (external link)
Are they just very habituated there or is this someone's pet? It definitely looks curious about the camera :)

They are wild animals used to having people about.
Doubt it would be a pet.
Wallabies assimilate easily into human life if given right conditions. As in no threats from humans and dogs.



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avondale87
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Post edited 2 months ago by avondale87. (4 edits in all)
     
Jul 29, 2021 07:14 |  #2063

I think this is a Southern brown bandicoot (Isoodon obesulus), a ground dwelling marsupial
I just know it as a Bandicoot
It frequents gardens but is preyed on by cats


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Edit: I wasn't happy with the blade of grass across its nose so removed the grass


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Snydremark
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Jul 30, 2021 01:48 |  #2064

avondale87 wrote in post #19265452 (external link)
They are wild animals used to having people about.
Doubt it would be a pet.
Wallabies assimilate easily into human life if given right conditions. As in no threats from humans and dogs.

It just looked really calm, and there are plenty of dumb&*Y^^ on this side of the globe that keep 'em as pets. Love the photo, though.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
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avondale87
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Jul 30, 2021 16:52 |  #2065

Snydremark wrote in post #19266027 (external link)
It just looked really calm, and there are plenty of dumb&*Y^^ on this side of the globe that keep 'em as pets. Love the photo, though.

Thanks
It's actually illegal here to have them as pets, zoos okay!
In many areas where humans and these interact they really are tame. Even to the place where they can be touched.
This one wasn't that quiet, but certainly inquisitive.
The larger ones can get aggressive though and they have large claws and inflict serious damage easily.

Kangaroos, much larger, can be extremely aggressive and you definitely don't meddle with them.

This one was pure wild

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Snydremark
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Jul 30, 2021 17:36 |  #2066

avondale87 wrote in post #19266235 (external link)
Thanks
It's actually illegal here to have them as pets, zoos okay!
In many areas where humans and these interact they really are tame. Even to the place where they can be touched.
This one wasn't that quiet, but certainly inquisitive.
The larger ones can get aggressive though and they have large claws and inflict serious damage easily.

Kangaroos, much larger, can be extremely aggressive and you definitely don't meddle with them.

This one was pure wild

Heh....yeah, that one I'd be a little wary of even if it approached. Looks large enough to be moderately inconvenient to have it get cranky :p Well aware of the bigger ones and generally avoiding any sort of 'close' contact; seen what those bad boys can do :o Unfortunately, illegal or not, a lot of people acquire and keep things they shouldn't. I'm still saddened by the loss of one of the Wallabies from a regional "zoo" out in the foothills of the mtns here that had one escape in the middle of a severe winter 3 or 4 years ago :(


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
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Inspeqtor
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Jul 30, 2021 18:28 |  #2067

avondale87 wrote in post #19266235 (external link)
Thanks
It's actually illegal here to have them as pets, zoos okay!
In many areas where humans and these interact they really are tame. Even to the place where they can be touched.
This one wasn't that quiet, but certainly inquisitive.
The larger ones can get aggressive though and they have large claws and inflict serious damage easily.

Kangaroos, much larger, can be extremely aggressive and you definitely don't meddle with them.

This one was pure wild

How often do you see kangaroos in the wild?


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avondale87
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Post edited 2 months ago by avondale87. (2 edits in all)
     
Jul 30, 2021 18:37 |  #2068

Inspeqtor wrote in post #19266271 (external link)
How often do you see kangaroos in the wild?

Charles here in Tasmania they are literally everywhere.
Anywhere there's a bit of bush (forest) they will find enough cover to hide in.
The wallaby road kill is phenomenal. Drive on the roads and it's nothing to see one or more every km in some places.
They breed prolifically.
In some places farmers either mass cull (permit) or install very expensive wallaby fencing.
They graze grass to the ground.

We've a couple living here and we see occasionally. They haven't got used to us like the wrens.

It's in the national parks where visitors flock you will encounter the tamest

For the not so squeamish https://www.abc.net.au …ital-of-the-world/7021816 (external link)
Someone claims there's 500000 roadkill each year. Don't know how they estimated that



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Maureen ­ Souza
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Jul 31, 2021 12:52 as a reply to  @ post 19264293 |  #2069

Yes! That is exactly what the So African photographers called it….a Leopard pretending to be a meerkat. The gray objects in the background are zebra.


Life is hard...but I just take it one photograph at a time.

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Ray.Petri
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Aug 03, 2021 23:05 |  #2070

avondale87 wrote in post #19266278 (external link)
Charles here in Tasmania they are literally everywhere.
Anywhere there's a bit of bush (forest) they will find enough cover to hide in.
The wallaby road kill is phenomenal. Drive on the roads and it's nothing to see one or more every km in some places.
They breed prolifically.
In some places farmers either mass cull (permit) or install very expensive wallaby fencing.
They graze grass to the ground.

We've a couple living here and we see occasionally. They haven't got used to us like the wrens.

It's in the national parks where visitors flock you will encounter the tamest

For the not so squeamish https://www.abc.net.au …ital-of-the-world/7021816 (external link)
Someone claims there's 500000 roadkill each year. Don't know how they estimated that

Interesting link, Richard, thanks. It looks like your roads are almost paved with road kill wildlife - sad. I didn’t realise that your speed limits are in km/h. 35 equates to 21mph. How many comply-?
Surely a collision with a grown up kangaroo will result in a big accident and insurance claim.:-(
I once hit a badger at night at about 60mph and the car got shook up a bit - I looked for the badger and it had run off - by some miracle the car wasn’t even scratched. A friend hit one and it took his radiator out among other damage. Around here it’s mainly foxes, badgers, cats and birds that get hit.


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What kind of Wildlife Photographer Are "YOU"
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