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Thread started 15 Jul 2018 (Sunday) 00:03
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Australian Animals - Wild & Free - not in zoos

 
sogs
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Jan 16, 2023 10:09 |  #391

Pippan wrote in post #19468390 (external link)
The Camel's hump is an ugly lump
Which well you may see at the Zoo;
But uglier yet is the hump we get
From having too little to do.
Rudyard Kipling

Near Winton, in western Queensland.

Camels (technically Dromedaries) are not native to Australia but are now living throughout the arid inland of our continent, with an estimated population in the order of one million. They are descendents of camels brought to Australia by Afghan and Pakistani cameleers, who used them to provide transport services during the 19th century for colonists who were spreading into Australia's outback. Camels (and colonists) do a lot of damage to fragile ecosystems but are present in numbers too large to control, and are loved by many in the outback.
Hosted photo: posted by Pippan in
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forum: Wildlife

That's crazy. One million. I would never have known there were any in Australia.


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Lyn2011
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Jan 17, 2023 03:24 |  #392

Pippan wrote in post #19468390 (external link)
The Camel's hump is an ugly lump
Which well you may see at the Zoo;
But uglier yet is the hump we get
From having too little to do.
Rudyard Kipling

Near Winton, in western Queensland.

Camels (technically Dromedaries) are not native to Australia but are now living throughout the arid inland of our continent, with an estimated population in the order of one million. They are descendents of camels brought to Australia by Afghan and Pakistani cameleers, who used them to provide transport services during the 19th century for colonists who were spreading into Australia's outback. Camels (and colonists) do a lot of damage to fragile ecosystems but are present in numbers too large to control, and are loved by many in the outback.
Hosted photo: posted by Pippan in
./showthread.php?p=194​68390&i=i123325966
forum: Wildlife

One million is too many. I've heard that every year there are about 25000 removed or killed to maintain the population?




  
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Pippan
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Jan 17, 2023 04:15 |  #393

Lyn2011 wrote in post #19468802 (external link)
One million is too many. I've heard that every year there are about 25000 removed or killed to maintain the population?

There is some culling and a small industry in exporting live camels back to places like Saudi Arabia, where their genes provide 'fresh blood' to camel populations used for racing, and for meat. I understand Australia has the world's largest population of wild, undomesticated and unowned camels. A few are caught and trained up for tourism purposes too, but none of this is on a scale that even goes close to making a dent in the increasing population of these feral animals. In drought times they are invading towns like Kaltukatjara, near the Northern Territory/Western Australia border west of Uluru (where I worked in the '90s) and wreaking havoc with water supply and other infrastructure. Here (external link) is a short video that shows some wild mustering of camels in that area.


Still waiting for the wisdom they promised would be worth getting old for.

  
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Lyn2011
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Jan 17, 2023 04:34 |  #394

Pippan wrote in post #19468807 (external link)
There is some culling and a small industry in exporting live camels back to places like Saudi Arabia, where their genes provide 'fresh blood' to camel populations used for racing, and for meat. I understand Australia has the world's largest population of wild, undomesticated and unowned camels. A few are caught and trained up for tourism purposes too, but none of this is on a scale that even goes close to making a dent in the increasing population of these feral animals. In drought times they are invading towns like Kaltukatjara, near the Northern Territory/Western Australia border west of Uluru (where I worked in the '90s) and wreaking havoc with water supply and other infrastructure. Here (external link) is a short video that shows some wild mustering of camels in that area.

Thanks for the info Pippan. It's a pity that not more is done for our country.




  
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Jan 17, 2023 05:11 |  #395

Lyn2011 wrote in post #19468814 (external link)
Thanks for the info Pippan. It's a pity that not more is done for our country.

Yes, in a couple of centuries we've managed to completely stuff up the continental-scale productive garden that had taken millennia to create.


Still waiting for the wisdom they promised would be worth getting old for.

  
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avondale87
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Jan 17, 2023 05:30 |  #396

Pippan wrote in post #19468807 (external link)
There is some culling and a small industry in exporting live camels back to places like Saudi Arabia, where their genes provide 'fresh blood' to camel populations used for racing, and for meat. I understand Australia has the world's largest population of wild, undomesticated and unowned camels. A few are caught and trained up for tourism purposes too, but none of this is on a scale that even goes close to making a dent in the increasing population of these feral animals. In drought times they are invading towns like Kaltukatjara, near the Northern Territory/Western Australia border west of Uluru (where I worked in the '90s) and wreaking havoc with water supply and other infrastructure. Here (external link) is a short video that shows some wild mustering of camels in that area.

Some typical uninformed responses to that video.
Sympathy for the poor camel doesn't magic the environment.
We have deer here doing unpleasant things but their cuteness overtakes emotions and the rest follows



Richard

  
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nardes
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Jan 19, 2023 14:52 |  #397

On a recent walk in the Lamington National Park, we came across this Lamington spiny crayfish cruising along the bottom of the shallow creek bed. They are very shy and retreat to deeper water, hiding under submerged rocks when disturbed. They can be quite difficult to spot in the darker parts of the rain forest.

They can often be seen in creek crossings or on the damp forest floor during summer. These colourful crustaceans have been known to travel more than a kilometre overland between freshwater streams. You won’t find them anywhere else in Australia!:-)

They are rare and protected under Queensland law from poachers. Which holds a hefty penalty for anyone caught poaching them!

Cheers

Dennis

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avondale87
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Jan 19, 2023 15:07 |  #398

nardes wrote in post #19469809 (external link)
On a recent walk in the Lamington National Park, we came across this Lamington spiny crayfish cruising along the bottom of the shallow creek bed. They are very shy and retreat to deeper water, hiding under submerged rocks when disturbed. They can be quite difficult to spot in the darker parts of the rain forest.

They can often be seen in creek crossings or on the damp forest floor during summer. These colourful crustaceans have been known to travel more than a kilometre overland between freshwater streams. You won’t find them anywhere else in Australia!:-)

They are rare and protected under Queensland law from poachers. Which holds a hefty penalty for anyone caught poaching them!

Cheers

Dennis

Hosted photo: posted by nardes in
./showthread.php?p=194​69809&i=i190039129
forum: Wildlife

Hosted photo: posted by nardes in
./showthread.php?p=194​69809&i=i119590443
forum: Wildlife

That's awesome in every way Dennis.
Never heard of them.
Very colourful.
You certainly captured it beautifully.



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nardes
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Jan 19, 2023 16:15 |  #399

avondale87 wrote in post #19469813 (external link)
That's awesome in every way Dennis.
Never heard of them.
Very colourful.
You certainly captured it beautifully.

Thanks Richard, I managed to sneak up on the crayfish using my advanced fieldwork and cutting-edge tracking skills before it spotted me and submerged and hid under a rock. ;-)a

I was pleased that the fill-in flash did not produce any unwanted reflections on the murky creek.:-)

Cheers

Dennis




  
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Jan 20, 2023 03:14 |  #400

I came across this Land Mullet sunning itself in the Lamington National Park on a recent visit. :-)

Although it has a fishy name, the Land Mullet is actually the largest member of the skink family of lizards. Large adults can reach 50cm or more in total length. The name comes from the smooth, shiny, black fish-like scales that cover the body. They are among the largest skinks in the world.

Found mostly in the rainforests along Australia’s eastern coast, most of its days are spent basking in the sun, trying to get its core body temperature up. It spends the majority of its time in isolation, and only seeks other land mullets when it’s time to mate.

Land mullets tend to be shy and elusive creatures, so they’re not that easy to spot in the wild.

Cheers

Dennis

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avondale87
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Jan 20, 2023 03:22 |  #401

nardes wrote in post #19470014 (external link)
I came across this Land Mullet sunning itself in the Lamington National Park on a recent visit. :-)

Although it has a fishy name, the Land Mullet is actually the largest member of the skink family of lizards. Large adults can reach 50cm or more in total length. The name comes from the smooth, shiny, black fish-like scales that cover the body. They are among the largest skinks in the world.

Found mostly in the rainforests along Australia’s eastern coast, most of its days are spent basking in the sun, trying to get its core body temperature up. It spends the majority of its time in isolation, and only seeks other land mullets when it’s time to mate.

Land mullets tend to be shy and elusive creatures, so they’re not that easy to spot in the wild.

Cheers

Dennis

Hosted photo: posted by nardes in
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interesting and quite special. Looks well fed
Another animal I've never heard of. Keep them coming Dennis



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Lyn2011
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Jan 20, 2023 03:56 |  #402

nardes wrote in post #19469809 (external link)
On a recent walk in the Lamington National Park, we came across this Lamington spiny crayfish cruising along the bottom of the shallow creek bed. They are very shy and retreat to deeper water, hiding under submerged rocks when disturbed. They can be quite difficult to spot in the darker parts of the rain forest.

They can often be seen in creek crossings or on the damp forest floor during summer. These colourful crustaceans have been known to travel more than a kilometre overland between freshwater streams. You won’t find them anywhere else in Australia!:-)

They are rare and protected under Queensland law from poachers. Which holds a hefty penalty for anyone caught poaching them!

Cheers

Dennis

Hosted photo: posted by nardes in
./showthread.php?p=194​69809&i=i190039129
forum: Wildlife

Hosted photo: posted by nardes in
./showthread.php?p=194​69809&i=i119590443
forum: Wildlife

Very special, how large is it?




  
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Lyn2011
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Jan 20, 2023 03:57 |  #403

nardes wrote in post #19470014 (external link)
I came across this Land Mullet sunning itself in the Lamington National Park on a recent visit. :-)

Although it has a fishy name, the Land Mullet is actually the largest member of the skink family of lizards. Large adults can reach 50cm or more in total length. The name comes from the smooth, shiny, black fish-like scales that cover the body. They are among the largest skinks in the world.

Found mostly in the rainforests along Australia’s eastern coast, most of its days are spent basking in the sun, trying to get its core body temperature up. It spends the majority of its time in isolation, and only seeks other land mullets when it’s time to mate.

Land mullets tend to be shy and elusive creatures, so they’re not that easy to spot in the wild.

Cheers

Dennis

Hosted photo: posted by nardes in
./showthread.php?p=194​70014&i=i40893715
forum: Wildlife

Beautiful, another very special animal.




  
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Jan 20, 2023 05:07 |  #404

avondale87 wrote in post #19470017 (external link)
interesting and quite special. Looks well fed
Another animal I've never heard of. Keep them coming Dennis

Thanks Richard, the animal posed nicely for me after checking out that I wasn't going to harm it.:-)

Lyn2011 wrote in post #19470023 (external link)
Very special, how large is it?

Thanks Lyn, this specimen was probably about 25 cms long (10 ins) although I understand they can grow up to 30 cms.:-)

Lyn2011 wrote in post #19470024 (external link)
Beautiful, another very special animal.

Thanks Lyn, it is quite special when they let you get close.:-)

Cheers

Dennis




  
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Jan 20, 2023 11:29 |  #405

nardes wrote in post #19470014 (external link)
I

Hosted photo: posted by nardes in
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Great shot and great info!


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