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Thread started 19 Jan 2007 (Friday) 19:17
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Taking the EOS Integrated Cleaning System for Granted

 
zasboy
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Jan 19, 2007 19:17 |  #1

Dust. We know it's all around us and it can creep into places where we don't want to such as on our camera sensor.

Even though I'm a bit upset to find out that my 1 month old XTi has dust on the sensor, I'm more puzzled on why some of the features of the EOS Integrated Cleaning System didn't perform as well I though it would. The features I'm referring to is the:
- The use of anti-static coating on the sensor surface
- The self cleaning sensor unit

Here are some photos to illustrate:
1) Canon 50mm @ f/22

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: 404 | MIME changed to 'text/html' | Byte size: ZERO


2) Tamron 70-300 @ f/22
IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: 404 | MIME changed to 'text/html' | Byte size: ZERO


I used good habits when changing lenses. Turning off the camera, camera body facing downward and having the lens rear cap pre-turn for easy on/off action. Even with this, I still got some dust :( I feel cheated because I thought the features in the EOS Integrated Cleaning System would prevent dust. I took it for granted and should not put too much faith into it. I know that a sensor will accumulate dust no matter how much prevention there is and that is a fact of life and I should just accept it. I could say that the EOS Integrated Cleaning System makes the sensor dust resistant but not dust proof.

Or maybe I'm just being a measurbator or whatever you people call the "perfectionist" :lol: I don't mind having a bit of dust but it might pose a problem later on when I have to use a small fstop. So just a precaution, I got a rocket blower coming in from B&H and will try to blow the dust off the sensor. Hopefully, the dust is not behind the anti-alias filter and is instead ontop of it. I don't want to bring my camera in for service :(

Anybody with an XTi, has your EOS Integrated Cleaning System been working as well as you expected?

-Thanks



  
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Mark_Cohran
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Jan 19, 2007 19:45 |  #2

I think you migh wnat to start by reading this thread:

https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=264574

Mark


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Glenn ­ NK
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Jan 19, 2007 19:46 |  #3

Yes, I'm afraid that sensor dust is a fact of life.:(

Do windshield wipers take all the water off the windshield? The list is long.

Dust as we commonly know it, floats in the air (everyone has watched a sunbeam coming through a crack in an otherwise dark room - it's loaded with dust).

And let's noforget that wearing parts (shutter and mirror) give off tiny bits of "wear stuff". It will be microscopic and it will float around, particularly when one considers the mirrror is a fan that's flapping about. The shutter curtain moves pretty fast too - hard to imagine that it doesn't stir up some dust with air also.

Just a few rambling thoughts on something I've learned to live with - although after two hours last night swabbing away, I too was a bit frustrated. I finally got the little buggers off.:D

By the way, the only time my lens comes off is to clean the sensor (I'm using a 24/105 zoom as my only lens). I still regularly get dust spots - that's one of the reasons I lean towards the theory of "internally generated dust/dirt".


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zasboy
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Jan 19, 2007 19:52 |  #4

Thanks for all the reply.

Mark, great link. It has answered a lot of my questions.




  
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coreypolis
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Jan 19, 2007 19:55 |  #5
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who shoots at f/22 anyways ;)

in the end thats nothing, I'm sure it will clean off easy. I usually have much much worse than that, but shoot wide open so its rarely a problem.

I still have 3rd world mud on many lenses from July.


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zasboy
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Jan 19, 2007 20:32 |  #6

Yeah, after reading countless thread on dust, I eventually grew a bit of paranoia for dust but then there are solutions so the paranoia is fading away. I wish there was a support group for people who has dust paranoia :)




  
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Rhilton4u
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Jan 19, 2007 21:01 as a reply to  @ zasboy's post |  #7

What about the "Dust Delete Data" function?


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simmo1
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Jan 20, 2007 04:40 as a reply to  @ Rhilton4u's post |  #8

So is it good practice to leave a lens on the camera when not in use or best to remove the lens and put the cap on the body ?


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wannasmaxx
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Jan 20, 2007 05:06 |  #9

coreypolis wrote in post #2568668 (external link)
who shoots at f/22 anyways ;)

in the end thats nothing, I'm sure it will clean off easy. I usually have much much worse than that, but shoot wide open so its rarely a problem.

I still have 3rd world mud on many lenses from July.

Didn't they tell you it's the developing world? Sheesh:lol:


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Jonathan
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Jan 20, 2007 10:50 |  #10

Rhilton4u wrote in post #2568965 (external link)
What about the "Dust Delete Data" function?

My experiments with this have shown that it only partially works. Worth a try if you need to ease that paranoia a bit ;-)a


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cosworth
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Jan 20, 2007 11:03 |  #11

coreypolis wrote in post #2568668 (external link)
who shoots at f/22 anyways ;)

in the end thats nothing, I'm sure it will clean off easy. I usually have much much worse than that, but shoot wide open so its rarely a problem.

I still have 3rd world mud on many lenses from July.

He typed what I wanted to type. Replace mud with sand and it's perfect.


people will always try to stop you doing the right thing if it is unconventional
Full frame and some primes.

  
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Hellashot
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Jan 20, 2007 11:23 |  #12
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DPP has a clone function to remove dust the vibrating filter doesn't remove. Also you should avoid using f22 on a 1.6x sensor. Max you should use is f13 unless you really need to let less light in or need extremem DOF. Even then your dust spots likely won't be visible unless most of your picture is white or light blue as the dust will easily blend in with colors.

If that was f22, I double you'd see anything at f13.


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Taking the EOS Integrated Cleaning System for Granted
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