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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 10 Mar 2007 (Saturday) 12:16
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Pictures darker then on screen.. 30D?

 
DEMO
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Mar 10, 2007 12:16 |  #1

Hello everyone, for some reason my pictures are coming out darker then what is seen on the display. last week I tried shooting some indoor roller hockey and everything seemed good until I uploaded the pictures. Every picture was just down right dark. Is their a way to calibrate the screen or some how fix this..

Example:
This is what I seen on the display..

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: 404 | MIME changed to 'text/html' | Byte size: ZERO


This is what I actually took..
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HTTP response: 404 | MIME changed to 'image/gif' | Byte size: ZERO

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Bob_A
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Mar 10, 2007 12:18 |  #2

Never use the preview image on the camera's LCD screen to judge exposure. Get a good understanding of how the various metering modes work and how to use the histogram.


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Mar 10, 2007 12:20 |  #3

Go to dpreview.com and look in their Reviews of cameras. In the review for a particular camera they put a multisegment grayscale bar, so that you can adjust the brightness and contrast of your monitor so that you can distinguish one segment from the other for the greatest number of segments. If you adjust your monitor for that, your monitor will be pretty well adjusted.


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DEMO
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Mar 10, 2007 12:21 |  #4

Ok, I figured viewing the display would give me a good example of what I should expect. Sorry I'm not talking about my monitor but the diplay on the actual camera..


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crn3371
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Mar 10, 2007 12:21 |  #5

What Bob said. Only use your lcd for viewing settings, looking at histogram, and general composition. You will never get enough accuracy, and fine detail, to use it for judging exposure.




  
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DEMO
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Mar 10, 2007 12:33 |  #6

ok, Thanks guys.. So tonight im going to a car show, I know im not going to learn how to read the histogram in this short of time so is thier anyway I can try and make my display view something reasonable.. I just don't want to expect my pictures to be some what on and they come out trash worthy AGAIN..


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DEMO
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Mar 10, 2007 12:41 |  #7

I looked at my camera and the screen brightness was turned up. I think I found my problem.. I will go out and take a few pictures and make sure thats what it was.. Thanks for the help.


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kumicho
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Mar 10, 2007 13:36 |  #8

DEMO wrote in post #2848203 (external link)
ok, Thanks guys.. So tonight im going to a car show, I know im not going to learn how to read the histogram in this short of time so is thier anyway I can try and make my display view something reasonable.. I just don't want to expect my pictures to be some what on and they come out trash worthy AGAIN..

turn on your histogram, and see what you can figure out today/tonight. Peaks on the left show what is dark, peaks on the right show what is light. You won't become a pro in a day, but if the levels on the histogram are concentrated on the left hand side, chances are it'll be too dark. :)


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Juan ­ Zas
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Mar 10, 2007 13:48 |  #9

Is your EV compensation to 0? It´s the easiest way to get darker images ... also display brightness control too high ...


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Bob_A
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Mar 10, 2007 13:49 |  #10

kumicho wrote in post #2848467 (external link)
turn on your histogram, and see what you can figure out today/tonight. Peaks on the left show what is dark, peaks on the right show what is light. You won't become a pro in a day, but if the levels on the histogram are concentrated on the left hand side, chances are it'll be too dark. :)

It will probably work for you in a pinch to expose such that the histogram is touching the right hand side of the scale without seeing a spike on that side. This isn't always what you want to do, but is good enough to get you started. The nice thing about digital is that you can practice and it doesn't cost you anything but time.

Underexposure will lead to an image with poorer shadow detail and a lot of noise after the underexposure is corrected in post processing. Overexposure will lead to blown highlights (or more), which is data that is lost forever.

It would also pay to get a good book on photography like "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Petersen and develop a better understanding of your cameras controls and metering modes.


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DEMO
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Mar 10, 2007 14:02 |  #11

Lol.. I actually just bought the book. I should have it sometime next week..


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circa
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Mar 10, 2007 14:27 |  #12

I would also turn the brightness of your LCD down.


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Mar 10, 2007 16:13 |  #13

With all due respect, I don't think that's the image on your screen. It's a post-processed version of the second image, and you're telling us that your screen view looked like it. And it's processed up quite nicely, hasn't it?

The screen "brightness" is often misleading, as commented on above, particularly when the image is dark (eg night shots) or underexposed (as would seem to be the case above). Learn to use the histogram, as described above, just ensuring that it doesn't quite touch the right hand end will often suffice. Learn how to use exposure compensation in difficult lighting.

Learn how to get the best out of your light meter. There's a lot of white in your photo - that can make the metering use a shorter exposure, and hence underexpose - the meter is not "clever", you need to supply the brains. Possibly in that type of image, use the spot meter setting to meter off skin tones. Or if the lighting is constant, once you have established the correct setting, leave it there, on manual.

You could always photograph the LCD screen and show us what it actually shows (including the histogram, which I bet is far off to the left...).

Have fun and take lots more
Nigel


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DEMO
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Mar 10, 2007 16:25 |  #14

Of course that not the exact picture that I first seen. When I snapped the picture I figured I had took something close to that interms of exposure.. :rolleyes:


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Mar 10, 2007 16:30 |  #15

I know exactly what you're talking about, DEMO. I borrowed a friend's 30D to take pictures at an indoor party with poor lighting and ran into the exact same thing. The pics on the camera LCD looked great, but when I got them home to process, they were mostly 1-2 stops under-exposed. I learned my lesson then to not trust the LCD for gauging exposure. From now on, I'm watching the histogram to double-check.


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Pictures darker then on screen.. 30D?
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