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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Weddings & Other Family Events 
Thread started 25 Jun 2007 (Monday) 19:12
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how stable is a wedding photography business...?

 
gheesom
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Jun 26, 2007 07:52 |  #16

So you're pretty quick then ;) Yeah waiting for people to get back can feel like an age.


Gareth
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RobKirkwood
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Jun 26, 2007 08:12 |  #17

Around 2 hours for Ann and me to go through everything we shot and pick out the ones we're going to present as the 'best' images (usually ends up being somewhere around 200-300 images).

Around 4-6 hours for me to then go through and deal with these 200-300 images - correcting WB, exposure, cropping, levels, etc., plus fixing any major issues that need cloning, etc.. I then let Adobe Bridge get on with batch processing these out to same-size jpegs, and then working from those jpegs I let Adobe Bridge/Photoshop generate the web gallery and online ordering system using EOS template. We print 6x4 from these full-size files, and also use them to generate 6x4 quality jpegs if client is having a CD of these. When we get orders for larger prints, and/or album, and/or hi-res DVD we'll look again at those images on an individual basis and usually spend a bit more time refining them.

flipteg wrote in post #3441771 (external link)
... yes, i do take the pictures as best as i could with the thought that the better the picture, the less the post processing, but sometimes, that's just not possible especailly since no matter how good a picture is straight from the camera, Photoshop can improve pretty much all the pictures i take...

I've spent much of my life being a perfectionist, and in the process been my own most-severe critic. One of the lessons I've found most difficult to learn is the concept of something being 'good enough'. Yes we could spend ages with every single image tweaking it in Photoshop, but would the client appreciate it or even notice it? ...and, more importantly, would they pay for the extra time involved? Where you draw the line on what is 'good enough' is, of course, a personal decision - your 'good enough' might be my 'perfection' :)

Rob




  
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Atl-Fotos
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Jun 26, 2007 09:10 |  #18

What I am learning is the more PP actions I can set for batch in PS the better. Currently I can get about 800 or so pics down to 500 with all Nix and fancy stuff in about 10-12hrs from download to finish product for proofing.

To go back to the original question, I have been at it for a few years and I have not quit my day job just yet... I wish this business was like opening a McDonald's where as soon as people see the gold arches they come flocking to you but.... This is a business where you need to build a reputation and that just takes time.... However I have spoken with some established photogs and after many years of work, they are comfortable with their income... So if you keep moving towards your goal, eventually you will reach it.


Ron
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liza
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Jun 26, 2007 10:39 |  #19
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I'm old and slow when it comes to PP. It takes me a couple of weeks to go through and PP all the images. After I cull out the poor ones, I take the keepers and choose the standouts for special effects, which I do individually. The others receive basic color correction, curves, and sharpening. My volume is low right now, so I can afford to take a little extra time. I'll probably never book more than two weddings in a month for this reason.



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Palladium
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Jun 26, 2007 10:50 as a reply to  @ liza's post |  #20

Well - IMPO the TIME ELEMENT is irrelevant because unless your comparing apples to apples (eg. computers to computers) it doesnt' mean anything.

Opening an image on a poor performing computer vs. editing on a powerhouse cpu is apples to oranges.

1 person's 10 hours could be another 2 hours.

What important is the final image not how long it took to process it/them.




  
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flipteg
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Jun 26, 2007 11:27 |  #21

Palladium wrote in post #3442529 (external link)
Well - IMPO the TIME ELEMENT is irrelevant because unless your comparing apples to apples (eg. computers to computers) it doesnt' mean anything.

Opening an image on a poor performing computer vs. editing on a powerhouse cpu is apples to oranges.

1 person's 10 hours could be another 2 hours.

What important is the final image not how long it took to process it/them.

to an extent i agree with you, but you can not forget that you are running a business... yes, photography is an art and time should not be a factor if it compromises the quality of the product, but if you ignore the business side of what you are doing, then you are compromising the survival of your business...




  
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maytownme
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Jun 26, 2007 16:04 |  #22

Well im hoping to start in the "business" soon.My short term goal to be working as apart time wedding photographer,weekends or i can go flexible with my day job.Maybe if this becomes reality and I can do the job well with happy clients etc,maybe only then would i consider going fulltime at this.There seems to be nothing solid as far as earning a steady income from being a fulltime pro wedding photographer and the thought of being in the bussiness full time scares me.How could I pay my big mortage when times go slack,thats what i would be worried about.I would not even consider leaping to this full time,not a chance.I have just completed 2 years night classes at digital photography and i remember about 1 month into the course,i relised its the first time in my life I have found something that i would be happy to work at for therest of my life,im 33 now.
I also find this forum a true inspiration for any beginner,it has everything there is you want to know in it somewhere,and above all it has input from pro photographers who share there experience and knowledge and that is priceless for me!


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tim
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand
     
Jun 27, 2007 04:01 |  #23

Palladium wrote in post #3442529 (external link)
Well - IMPO the TIME ELEMENT is irrelevant because unless your comparing apples to apples (eg. computers to computers) it doesnt' mean anything.

Opening an image on a poor performing computer vs. editing on a powerhouse cpu is apples to oranges.

1 person's 10 hours could be another 2 hours.

What important is the final image not how long it took to process it/them.

I find it's the person that's usually the limiting factor, not the PC. People think slower than computers run, even old ones. The workflow makes a HUGE difference, eg batching, and knowing when you should and shouldn't post process something.

Running a photography business is a steep learning curve.


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how stable is a wedding photography business...?
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