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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 27 Sep 2007 (Thursday) 16:16
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Do you sharpen ALL the time when post processing?

 
jtown
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Sep 27, 2007 16:16 |  #1

I'm fairly new to shooting RAW and the DSLR world and I was wondering if you ALWAYS apply some sort of sharpening (assuming it makes the image look better) to your images. It seems like upping the sharpness (at least on my last shoot) made all my images look significantly better.




  
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sdmaker
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Sep 27, 2007 16:20 |  #2

I do.




  
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Bobster
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Sep 27, 2007 16:29 |  #3

if you shoot RAW a little sharpening always helps :)


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Lowner
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Sep 27, 2007 16:29 |  #4

If its worth spending time on, yes, always.

I start by sharpening in DPP, when converting the RAW file to TIFF, then whatever else I do, I'll sharpen again prior to printing, based on finished print size (or to be more precise - based on print resolution). So its twice minimum, possibly more if I need to mid session.

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ghosh
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Sep 27, 2007 17:16 |  #5

i do not always. I use L series lens. Pictures are it self awesome sharp. If at all I do then usually after I have fixed the size of the image.


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poloman
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Sep 27, 2007 17:59 |  #6

http://ronbigelow.com …les/sharpen1/sh​arpen1.htm (external link)


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toneyw
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Sep 27, 2007 18:09 |  #7

Everything in moderation. . .


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tim
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Sep 27, 2007 18:31 |  #8

My RAW convertor (ACR) applies a little sharpening by default, I don't usually sharpen any more than that.


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Damo77
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Sep 27, 2007 19:12 |  #9

Yes, I always sharpen. I don't care how good your lens is.


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Geo
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Sep 27, 2007 19:45 |  #10

Nice link, thank for sharing.


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jtown
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Sep 27, 2007 20:14 |  #11

Ah ok. So I wasn't just amazed at what the post processing sharpening can do. Of course I didn't blast it up to full, but whatever I think fit the scene.




  
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Dan-o
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Sep 27, 2007 21:42 |  #12

I created a droplet in CS3 so when I export my pictures from Lightroom all the pictures go thru a sharpening Action.


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cricketboy75
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Sep 27, 2007 21:46 |  #13

i try to be selective, but sometimes it just gets too time consuming so i just wind up sharpening everything. i find that unless you have a really sharp lens, like an L series canon, then generally Canon SLRs produce pics which are on the softer side. that means that it's probably pretty safe just to sharpen all pics if you want to save time.




  
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Tsmith
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Sep 27, 2007 21:59 |  #14

Any image that is resized for posting on the web will need post process sharpening.




  
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poloman
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Sep 28, 2007 09:16 |  #15

Digital images inherently need sharpening because of the way the sensor sees the world. When there is a transition from dark to light or "an edge" the processor will create an interim shade along that line. Sharpening resolves this problem.
My favorite is high pass in photoshop. After you sharpen you can adjust the opacity of the layer so that you get exactly the amount of sharpening you would like.


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Do you sharpen ALL the time when post processing?
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