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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 04 Nov 2007 (Sunday) 10:31
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2 general DSLR questiosn - Exposure comp and ISO

 
simmonsrandal
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Nov 04, 2007 10:31 |  #1

Why would you want to use overexposure compensation? Is when you automatic settings and want to alter what the camera is saying proper exposure is?

When should you change your ISO setting? Is only when the shutter speeds get out of the realm of what you can hand hold?




  
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Nov 04, 2007 10:34 |  #2

simmonsrandal wrote in post #4250064 (external link)
A:Why would you want to use overexposure compensation? Is when you automatic settings and want to alter what the camera is saying proper exposure is?

B:When should you change your ISO setting? Is only when the shutter speeds get out of the realm of what you can hand hold?

A: Correct.

B: Correct.


Glad I could help. :-D


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MaDProFF
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Nov 04, 2007 10:38 |  #3

a yes

b not always, you may want a smaller aperture and min shutter speed or higher than hand hold, IE sports you need higher than hand hold, so you set F stop as low as poss, and then decide on a shutter speed to stop to much motion blur, and make the difference up with ISO, which is why it is good for camera these days to have auto ISO


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simmonsrandal
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Nov 23, 2007 01:48 |  #4

so keep it on iso 100 when at all possible>?




  
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Chandler.
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Nov 23, 2007 01:51 |  #5

simmonsrandal wrote in post #4368946 (external link)
so keep it on iso 100 when at all possible>?

ISO 100 (or lower) will give you the highest amount of detail in your images, but don't be afraid to go higher. I usually keep my camera at ISO 200, unless light allows for 100.


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Nov 23, 2007 01:59 |  #6

sommonsrandal.

These are complex questions and require complex answers. The answers are pretty much complex enough to fill a book. The most recommended book at this point is Understanding Exposure, by Bryan Pertersen.

We can give you nutshell advice: sharp pictures, go to f/8 or f/11. Fast pictures, go to f/4, f/2.8, or lower/faster. Landscape photography, use a tripod and go to f/16 or higher. You have to get out and read up, then come back and ask some specific things that we can answer!


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nicksan
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Nov 23, 2007 09:51 |  #7

simmonsrandal wrote in post #4250064 (external link)
Why would you want to use overexposure compensation? Is when you automatic settings and want to alter what the camera is saying proper exposure is?

When should you change your ISO setting? Is only when the shutter speeds get out of the realm of what you can hand hold?

Yep, you've got the idea.
The camera's metering system is easily fooled under more challenging scenes. Typical example would be high contrast scenes. You would dial in exposure compensation depending on what you want properly exposed in the frame. (This assumes you are in Av or Tv mode...in M, you simply adjust either the aperture, shutter, or ISO to under/over-expose.

As far as ISO setting, that is the general idea. I keep it at ISO 100 unless I need the extra speed. It could also go in reverse. If I wanted to slow the shutter speed down even more (for instance, getting that silky smooth water fall pic) then I might lower it to ISO 50. (Better yet, probably use a ND filter to get rid of a few stops of light)




  
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rkkwan
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Nov 23, 2007 10:03 as a reply to  @ nicksan's post |  #8

One major advantage of the larger sensor sizes of dSLR compared to compact P&S is that the high ISO pictures are much more usable with relatively low noise. So, don't be afraid to use the higher ISO for even daily use. For properly exposed photos, it'll take pixel-peeping for most to see the difference between ISO 100-400.

It is so different from most P&S that noise at 400 or higher are very visible.

For situations with borderline light, the higher ISO will give you insurance against motion - both camera shake and subject movement. A slightly noisier picture is 100x better than one that shows undesired shake.


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2 general DSLR questiosn - Exposure comp and ISO
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