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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 02 Oct 2008 (Thursday) 15:39
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Need Help: How should I light this scene?

 
BillsBayou
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Oct 02, 2008 15:39 |  #1

I've been press-ganged into being the Party Photographer for my Number-Two-Daughter's Middle School graduation party. I did this before with Number-One-Daughter, but now I've been "asked" to do it in a more official (yet unpaid) manner. I liked the candid party shots I did. I'm not too pleased with this shot.

This shot is 1/60th sec at f/2.8, 24mm focal length. I used my 580EX flash. I shot into the crowd. I assume I used the flip-down wide-angle filter on the flash.

How should I shoot this scene? The party will be held in the same room this coming May.


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What I've got to work with:
5D
580EX
420EX
3 Britek strobes with umbrellas and diffusers
(You can see my studio gear in THIS THREAD, but don't reply to that thread)

If I go with the strobes, I guess I can have my arm twised into purchasing three Pocket Wizard transceivers (seeing as my wife is the blame for accepting the gig). I wouldn't want trigger cords going around the room. I don't have a remote power supply for the strobe heads, so I'll have to use extension cords.

I'm not a professional in any sense. I'm more of an OCD amateur. I'm not getting paid for this gig. I see it as a learning experience.

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tim
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Oct 02, 2008 16:11 |  #2

Any direct light is going to be a problem. Assuming a white ceilng I would probably point the strobes at the ceiling - one beside you, one to your left and right, all pointing towards the ceiling at the front of the group. You don't need PWs, just use your 580 in M mode 1/64th to trigger then.


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BillsBayou
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Oct 02, 2008 16:33 |  #3

Two strobes at the ceiling, does that leave any light to fill the faces?


Take only pictures, leave only footprints...
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tim
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Oct 02, 2008 16:57 |  #4

If you point a light directly at the crowd the people in front will be bright, the people in back will be dark, like your photo above. Pointing the light at the ceiling at the front of the group was meant to help reduce shadows under the eyes. You might like on strobe to be point at the ceiling in front, and one in the middle, for a bit more evenness of light.

I get around this problem by taking the photo outside, from a ladder, preferably in shade but I manage in sun too.


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Jim ­ M
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Oct 02, 2008 23:45 |  #5

The farther away from your subjects you can get your light, the more evenly the light will cover them. Bounce is the easiest way to do this. With your considerable arsenal of flash devices, point most of them at the ceiling and use one on camera flash to brighten up the eyes.




  
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BillsBayou
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Oct 03, 2008 10:07 |  #6

Thanks for the input.

The party will be held at night, so outside is not going to work. Also, parent will be taking their own photos as well. I'm hoping I can get enough of them out of the way for the shot.

It occurs to me that I have access to the room most of the year. I should be able to talk to the manager about getting in there to do some test shots. Maybe I'll have my kids take up positions around the room to see if I can balance the light.

I like the idea of getting further from the subjects.


Take only pictures, leave only footprints...
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I must not break rule GN.4, Please help me un-see that photo, I must not break rule GN.4...
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z-monster
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Oct 03, 2008 10:11 as a reply to  @ Jim M's post |  #7

One thing that I see you have going for you is that you have already been to the room where this event will happen. I would seriously return to that room with a pen and notepad and do a series of test shots with your speedlites.

Granted you may not be able to gather a large crowd for testing but if you have a friend or two, he/she can be placed up front close to the camera and the second farther back.

Looking at the corner of the wall to the upper right portion of the photo, I have a good guess that the ceiling is rounded? If so, this will present a new challenge versus a flat ceiling when bouncing light.

Don't forget to take notes as you go along! Hence the notebook and pen.


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tim
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Oct 03, 2008 15:35 |  #8

BillsBayou wrote in post #6430118 (external link)
I like the idea of getting further from the subjects.

That only applies if you have the lights pointing straight towards them, if you bounce it off the ceiling closer is better.


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z-monster
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Oct 06, 2008 09:11 as a reply to  @ tim's post |  #9

Give this link a try.

http://strobist.blogsp​ot.com …peedlight-group-shot.html (external link)


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Need Help: How should I light this scene?
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