Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography 
Thread started 01 Nov 2008 (Saturday) 14:09
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

"Pro's" using bad equipment

 
ypx3
Senior Member
388 posts
Joined May 2007
Location: Kalamazoo, MI
     
Nov 03, 2008 04:39 |  #46

In most fields there some expectation to dress professionally. It is a matter of professional pride. I know it doesn't affect the pictures but it does diminish people's opinion of you.
As far as the gear though, I don't care if you're using a kodak easy share, as long as the pictures make me look good.


Always wanting to learn
If you edit, please tell me what you did.
C+C always wanted!!
flickr (external link)
Gear List

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
tim
Light Bringer
Avatar
51,010 posts
Likes: 372
Joined Nov 2004
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
     
Nov 03, 2008 04:44 |  #47

FlyingPhotog wrote in post #6613209 (external link)
True but the man does know how to wear the right accesories... ;)

cdifoto wrote in post #6613210 (external link)
Buffalo hide?

I don't think it's a buffalo he's hiding.


Professional wedding photographer, solution architect and general technical guy with multiple Amazon Web Services certifications.
Read all my FAQs (wedding, printing, lighting, books, etc)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
blackshadow
Mr T. from the A team
Avatar
5,732 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Jan 2006
Location: Melbourne, VIC Australia
     
Nov 03, 2008 07:44 |  #48

tim wrote in post #6613414 (external link)
I don't think it's a buffalo he's hiding.

He's known as "The Hedgehog" - maybe it's a hedgehog he's hiding.


Black Shadow Photography (external link)
Facebook (external link) Flickr (external link) Twitter (external link)
Gear List Myspace (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
blackshadow
Mr T. from the A team
Avatar
5,732 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Jan 2006
Location: Melbourne, VIC Australia
     
Nov 03, 2008 07:45 |  #49

tim wrote in post #6613136 (external link)
That's one of the most left field comment i've seen recently! Not sure it will survive if a moderator sees it and gets it ;)

I thought this thread needed a little levity.

I thought it was a fitting analogy!


Black Shadow Photography (external link)
Facebook (external link) Flickr (external link) Twitter (external link)
Gear List Myspace (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
asysin2leads
I'm kissing arse
Avatar
6,329 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Dec 2006
Location: Lebanon, OH
     
Nov 03, 2008 09:20 as a reply to  @ blackshadow's post |  #50

After a long overtime shift and 7 hours at the Obama rally, I needed a little levity pick me up. We were discussing the "pro vs amateur" topic the other day. I've made money from my prints, but I'm not quitting my day (well, night) job yet. Anyway, there are amateurs who can take it off the green box and get great shots. However, a pro can turn the camera on and re-create the shots on a whim. They've done it so much that they know how to properly compose dang near any shot, at any time, anywhere. They know how to use light, or lack thereof, properly.

I don't really trust the whole, "I'm a paid photographer; therefore, I'm a professional." I've been a volunteer firefighter for 17 years now, as well as a paid one. I'm just as much as a "professional" than any full-time firefighter. I have the same skills and certifications. If someone is able to make a living as a photographer, that's great. I've seen some local photographers who make a decent living at it, and their quality is crap.

This is just my opinion!!! I think that the majority of professionalism is a state of mind and an attitude.


Kevin
https://www.google.com ….com&ctz=Americ​a/New_York (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Michael_Lambert
-ColdMember-
Avatar
2,426 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Apr 2005
Location: Bradford, Ontario, Canada
     
Nov 03, 2008 09:33 |  #51

I can atest to the good gear does not mean good shots :D I have some really nice gear.. but my shots.. well :( I would not go as far as to say they are hire me i am a pro worthy :D


My Canon Gear
Michael Lambert Photography (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mattograph
"God bless the new meds"
Avatar
7,693 posts
Joined Jan 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
     
Nov 03, 2008 12:35 |  #52

blackshadow wrote in post #6613932 (external link)
He's known as "The Hedgehog" - maybe it's a hedgehog he's hiding.

I met Ron Jeremy in the bathroom of a "gentlemans club" in Vegas one time. An odd place to hold court, but he was joking around, having a good time.

In person, everything you think you know about Ron Jeremy is true.

Everything.


This space for rent.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
overclock
Goldmember
1,191 posts
Joined Jan 2005
Location: Fort Worth, TX
     
Nov 04, 2008 12:33 |  #53

I'd bet a 4x6 from an XT looks just as good as a 4x6 from a 5D.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ironchef31
Senior Member
623 posts
Joined Apr 2007
Location: Vancouver
     
Nov 04, 2008 13:47 |  #54

Than the arguement comes down to the durability of the camera.
You can be rough with the pro bodies but not the xt bodies.
How would you feel if you hired a photographer for a wedding and he shows up with an xt with 50,000 shutter actuations on it.
How about knocking the bodies on pews and tables as he is moving around getting the shots.

I guess you need to make sure you have several backup bodies.


Ken
30D, 18-55mm, nifty 50, 17-55 F2.8 IS, 70-200 F2.8 IS

I tried to bounce my flash off the ceiling once. Left a mark on the ceiling and broke my flash.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tim
Light Bringer
Avatar
51,010 posts
Likes: 372
Joined Nov 2004
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
     
Nov 04, 2008 14:41 |  #55

ironchef31 wrote in post #6623014 (external link)
How would you feel if you hired a photographer for a wedding and he shows up with an xt with 50,000 shutter actuations on it.

I typically don't check equipment of professionals I hire.

ironchef31 wrote in post #6623014 (external link)
How about knocking the bodies on pews and tables as he is moving around getting the shots.

How about treating your equipment with some respect?

ironchef31 wrote in post #6623014 (external link)
I guess you need to make sure you have several backup bodies.

Absolutely necessary.


Professional wedding photographer, solution architect and general technical guy with multiple Amazon Web Services certifications.
Read all my FAQs (wedding, printing, lighting, books, etc)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Mark
Dammit I need sleep
Avatar
3,386 posts
Joined May 2008
Location: Perth, Australia
     
Nov 05, 2008 06:42 |  #56

A friend of mine with a XT and kit lens shooting ambient in cathedral (paid) got better shots than the other pro there using a nikon D3, 14-24,24-70,70-200 and 400 and a sb-800, for added rabbit in the headlights effect

gear means realatively little, using the pop up flash, does mean something for sure :)


Mark

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SuzyView
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
32,093 posts
Gallery: 5 photos
Likes: 129
Joined Oct 2005
Location: Northern VA
     
Nov 05, 2008 06:51 |  #57

I love good gear and I save for it. I know many people just buy what they want. Others have to settle to a lot less than what I have. For pros, though, there is a standard, IMO for professional behavior. If the client likes your work and knows what they are getting, all is good, right?


Suzie - Still Speaking Canonese!
5DIV, SONY a7iii, 7D2, G12, M100, M50, 5 L's & 2 Primes, 25 bags.
My children and grandchildren are the reason, but it's the passion that drives me to get the perfect image of everything.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
neilwood32
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,231 posts
Likes: 3
Joined Sep 2007
Location: Sitting atop the castle, Edinburgh, Scotland
     
Nov 05, 2008 07:37 |  #58

IMHO its not the gear, its what you do with it that counts.

If you can produce the results your client wants with a disposable camera, then why not do it? "Professional photography" is not about producing the best photography, its about producing what the client wants/expects. They dont care about your gear (or lack of it), all they care about is the results.

If you can get by with a £1000 body/lens set up, why pay more? It only takes money from your salary!

As for how they dress, thats up to the client to decide if thats acceptable. Jeans/t-shirt wouldnt be to me but I'm not the client.


Having a camera makes you no more a photographer than having a hammer and some nails makes you a carpenter - Claude Adams
Keep calm and carry a camera!
My Gear

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
rossdagley
Member
Avatar
103 posts
Joined May 2007
Location: London, UK
     
Nov 05, 2008 17:46 |  #59

ironchef31 wrote in post #6623014 (external link)
Than the arguement comes down to the durability of the camera.
You can be rough with the pro bodies but not the xt bodies.
How would you feel if you hired a photographer for a wedding and he shows up with an xt with 50,000 shutter actuations on it.
How about knocking the bodies on pews and tables as he is moving around getting the shots.

I guess you need to make sure you have several backup bodies.

I shoot wedding photography as one of my (two) core incomes. I've shot a wedding this year with a 400D, when forced to (it's a backup to my backup). The images turned out just fine - it was a $3000+/- wedding shoot but I wasn't hesitant for a moment. Just a PITA I couldn't have both bodies I normally use on me.

RE durability, I have some 500+ skydives with a 20D and it's worked in harsher environments than 99.5% of all other 20D's ever made I'd estimate ;) It's been banged on tight airplane roofs or the underside of wings countless times, been required to go from -20 degrees to +20 degrees in under a minute and still function - the same for humidity - 10% to 100% humidity. It's been dropped more times than I like to think about too. You can't class the 20D as a pro body - but you CAN get nice consistant results, even with older or lower spec equipment. As my uncle (quite a good photographer here in the UK in the 70's) once told me before I discovered my passion in life - it's all in the eye, not the lens.

(*no EOS bodies were harmed in the making of this thread. Well, one was, but he got better)


Gear list

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Wilt
Reader's Digest Condensed version of War and Peace [POTN Vol 1]
Avatar
44,813 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 3647
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Belmont, CA
     
Nov 05, 2008 18:14 |  #60

ypx3 wrote in post #6613405 (external link)
In most fields there some expectation to dress professionally. It is a matter of professional pride. I know it doesn't affect the pictures but it does diminish people's opinion of you.
As far as the gear though, I don't care if you're using a kodak easy share, as long as the pictures make me look good.

'Artists'...dress professionally?! :confused:

Rich people are often shabbily dressed, too...their clothes give no clues as to their wealth any more than equipment gives a clue as to their artistry.

One does have to wonder about someone claiming a 'pro' tag with less than prosumer grade equipment, from the equipment flexibility to meet a very diverse range of situations, to issues of long term equipment durability (50k shutter vs. 100k or 300k shutter life).

It may well illustrate the statement "Now anyone can buy a dSLR and claim to be a 'professional' -- meaning 'gets paid for shooting', and not 'they know what they are doing'!


You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support https://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
Canon dSLR system, Olympus OM 35mm system, Bronica ETRSi 645 system, Horseman LS 4x5 system, Metz flashes, Dynalite studio lighting, and too many accessories to mention

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

17,991 views & 0 likes for this thread
"Pro's" using bad equipment
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is irishrover61
739 guests, 228 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.