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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 26 Sep 2009 (Saturday) 20:21
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POLL: "Focus/Recompose... or Select A Point... or.. OTHER"
Focus and Recompose using center point exclusively (feel free to elaborate).
78
51.3%
Select focus point based on are of interest (feel free to elaborate)
66
43.4%
Secret method that you now have to share with us.
8
5.3%

152 voters, 152 votes given (1 choice only choices can be voted per member)). VOTING IS FOR MEMBERS ONLY.
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Focus and Recompose.... or Choose a Focus Point?

 
Nistelrooydude
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Oct 03, 2009 10:29 as a reply to  @ post 8751439 |  #31

I've never really understood how to focus and recompose (I know it has something to do with the AF-On Button), so out of ignorance I select an AF point.




  
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Kristy
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Oct 15, 2009 12:04 |  #32

Interesting to see that the poll is nearly a split between focus and recompose, and center point...

You see... someone told me that I needed to quit toggling my focus points.. and I heavily disagree with it.. so I really wanted to see some solid opinions from people... :)

Thanks for giving your 2-cents and helping me realize that I'm okay after all. LOL...

Feel welcome to contine to contribute to the thread. I love reading the responses! :) Besides.. maybe someone really has a super secret method that I need to learn about.. lol


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DStanic
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Oct 15, 2009 12:19 |  #33

With my Rebel (400D) I almost always stick to center and recompose. It's too much work finding the button and dial to change the settings.

But with my 30D, it's easy moving the multi-dial to do quick changes. :) If I'm using a prime lens or fast zoom, I'll select the AF point when I can.


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puzzle
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Nov 03, 2009 08:02 as a reply to  @ DStanic's post |  #34

I almost never use the centre focus point and always choose the focus point which gets me closest to my desired compesition, I then lock the focus by half holding the shutter button down and recompose my shot. Does no one else use this method? It seems to be the most logical solution to me for candid portrait shots for example, here is my justification:

When using an off centre focus point (the one closest to the subjects eye) you do not need to move the camera so far to recompose once the focus is locked. The camera's geometry is therefore changed less so than if you were using the same method with the centre focus point. So far, noone seems to have come up with any proof that the off centre focus points are any less acurate than the centre focus point (at least not in this thread), therefore I think that as the geometry change is minimised when using the closest focus point, this outweighs any difference in strength/accuracy of the focus points.

This is just my opinion and perhaps somebody with greater knowledge can proove my theory wrong?

Lastly someone asked about the AF - on button so here is a link that explains it, it's not something I have used before but seems to be very useful for a great deal of people so it's certainly something that I will be having a play with very soon. http://www.usa.canon.c​om …ArticleAct&arti​cleID=2286 (external link)

Toggle focus is also something that I am not currently using due to habit but I think I will also be changing this in the very near future as I also srtuggle with the rotation wheel method ... it's too time consuming and has lead me to many missed shots.


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bjyoder
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Nov 03, 2009 10:24 |  #35

puzzle wrote in post #8946193 (external link)
I almost never use the centre focus point and always choose the focus point which gets me closest to my desired compesition, I then lock the focus by half holding the shutter button down and recompose my shot. Does no one else use this method? It seems to be the most logical solution to me for candid portrait shots for example, here is my justification:

When using an off centre focus point (the one closest to the subjects eye) you do not need to move the camera so far to recompose once the focus is locked. The camera's geometry is therefore changed less so than if you were using the same method with the centre focus point. So far, noone seems to have come up with any proof that the off centre focus points are any less acurate than the centre focus point (at least not in this thread), therefore I think that as the geometry change is minimised when using the closest focus point, this outweighs any difference in strength/accuracy of the focus points.

Canon claims that the center focus points on some cameras (your 50D for instance) are more sensitive with lenses that have a maximum aperture of f/2.8 or faster. Thus, say you're using your 85mm f/1.8, your center focus point will indeed be more accurate. Now, whether or not this matters is another debate that wasn't asked about! ;)

As for myself, it really depends on the situation. If I'm going to have time to switch focus points, I will do it if it makes sense. If I'm shooting more action-like things (sports or concerts, for example), then I'll stick with center point focus and recompose.


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yogestee
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Nov 03, 2009 10:47 |  #36

Canon claims that the center focus points on some cameras (your 50D for instance) are more sensitive with lenses that have a maximum aperture of f/2.8 or faster.

Ben,,,I've found this to be true on my 50D especially in very low light..


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puzzle
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Nov 03, 2009 10:49 as a reply to  @ yogestee's post |  #37

I know that were taking this thread further and further off topic now (sorry OP) but this subject has really caught my interest ... here are some sources relating to problems with the centre focus, recopose method for anyone else who may be interested.

http://blog.duncandavi​dson.com …nd-recompose-exposed.html (external link)

http://www.outbackphot​o.com …hnique/essay06/​essay.html (external link)


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_aravena
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Nov 03, 2009 10:50 |  #38

Very true indeed! I generally use the center focus but if it's more than one subject, then I select. Also if I don't want to point the camera directly at them initially, then I select another.


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Kristy
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Nov 03, 2009 11:22 |  #39

puzzle wrote in post #8947198 (external link)
I know that were taking this thread further and further off topic now (sorry OP) but this subject has really caught my interest ... here are some sources relating to problems with the centre focus, recopose method for anyone else who may be interested.

http://blog.duncandavi​dson.com …nd-recompose-exposed.html (external link)

http://www.outbackphot​o.com/workshop/photote​chnique/essay06/essay.​html (external link)

Awesome links! I am the OP and don't think this is off topic at all. It has been an interesting discussion and I was trying to find rationale for my shooting style.. So thought it would be interesting to do a poll.

I am not a fan of focus/recompose. For me it just isn't as effective as landing a focus point where I want focus and shooting it. A well respected photographer I know pretty much blew me out of the water for shooting this way and told me I needed to re-learn my technique... I walked away from the conversation feeling frustrated, and in a state of non agreement...

So I started this thread. I was so happy to see you links posted above supporting my style! :) YAY!

Thank you all for contribuiting to a great discussion.


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shooter ­ mcgavin
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Nov 04, 2009 00:14 |  #40

I'd like to be able to use the other focus points, but on my 20d, just using the center point in low light is so much faster and more reliable. If I'm outdoors I generally will use the others too.




  
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skidzam
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Nov 04, 2009 06:17 |  #41

For me, on my XSI, using center focus and recomposing with the shutter half depressed sometimes worked and sometimes didn't. So now, for static subjects with one shot, I set the camera's center point to focus lock with the * button then recompose and shoot with much better results.

For moving subjects, AI servo.




  
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neilwood32
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Nov 04, 2009 06:41 |  #42

I use whatever focus pint that suits my goal - whether its centre or off centre.

AI servo - always centre point and leave cropping room.

Focus & recompose always seems like a guessing game to me.


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Lani ­ Kai
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Nov 06, 2009 14:47 |  #43

I use the quick selector button on my 5D Mark II, but this is a problem when I'm shooting vertical shots. With the vertical grip, I can't reach the selector. As a result, I'm often lazy and just focus-recompose with the center point.
Another reason is that the peripheral points hunt too much and tend to be noticeably slower.


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drummerhc
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Nov 09, 2009 15:21 |  #44

Anything wider than f/2.8, I manually choose the AF point.


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imahawki
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Nov 09, 2009 15:25 |  #45

ShadowVlican wrote in post #8716215 (external link)
i select the closest focus point (easy to do on the 50D)

What's the fastest way to do this. I know you can push the focus point button in the upper right and then hit the joystick. Is there a way to eliminate the first step?


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Focus and Recompose.... or Choose a Focus Point?
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