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Thread started 29 Jan 2010 (Friday) 02:26
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One last question - Concepts of long exposure?

 
quadwing
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Jan 29, 2010 02:26 |  #1

One last question. =P Excuse my thread-making spree.

Alright, does anyone have any tips on the basics of long exposures? I'm kind of getting lost now, because I shot these two photos at f/22, 30", 100 ISO with the 50mm f/1.8 lens... They both came out harsh, lighting wise. The streetlights, etc..

http://img190.imagesha​ck.us/img190/826/img31​44w.jpg (external link)
http://img63.imageshac​k.us/img63/5200/img314​3c.jpg (external link)

I was wondering how I could get more photos like this during the night that aren't nearly as harsh, but are just as beautiful?

http://farm2.static.fl​ickr.com …18241687_719a2a​a5a8_o.jpg (external link) - something such as this

or this:

http://cmdawson.com …Paris-at-night-700458.jpg (external link)


Tips would be wonderful!


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FlyingPhotog
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Jan 29, 2010 02:38 |  #2

Traffic Lights are nearly impossible to hold back for two reasons:
1) They're high intensity light sources.
2) They're highly directional due to being focused through fresnel lenses.

Your other two examples are simply streetlights which aren't as intense and are much more omni directional. The more you can avoid point light sources (traffic lights, headlights, security flood lights, etc...) the better off you'll be when shooting in the dark.


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quadwing
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Jan 29, 2010 02:52 |  #3

FlyingPhotog wrote in post #9495679 (external link)
Traffic Lights are nearly impossible to hold back for two reasons:
1) They're high intensity light sources.
2) They're highly directional due to being focused through fresnel lenses.

Your other two examples are simply streetlights which aren't as intense and are much more omni directional. The more you can avoid point light sources (traffic lights, headlights, security flood lights, etc...) the better off you'll be when shooting in the dark.

Hm, well it's kind of funny, because that was kind of my goal. I wanted to get that type of photo. Especially a walk-light.

And streelights, I still interpret this photo I took to be rather boring.. I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong. Maybe it's the perspective? It just isn't eye-striking to me (no pun intended).

http://img63.imageshac​k.us/img63/6759/img314​2t.jpg (external link) - this. :\ Only reason I'm asking is because I'm driven to learn. I want to be the best I can be.


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yogestee
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Jan 29, 2010 09:09 |  #4

quadwing wrote:
=quadwing;9495647
Alright, does anyone have any tips on the basics of long exposures? I'm kind of getting lost now, because I shot these two photos at f/22, 30", 100 ISO with the 50mm f/1.8 lens... They both came out harsh, lighting wise. The streetlights, etc..

Night shots using long exposures isn't rocket science,,it's mainly guess work.. Shooting long exposures there is the glorious unknown of what you'll get.. You won't see what you'll get until you have the image up on a computer screen or the camera's LCD screen atleast.. One problem is contrast which you can use to your advantage if you are smart.. I like the blacks in the background, the points of white light and the high intensity colours,,some photographers don't..

Depending on the situation I normally start at 15 seconds at f/11 at 100 ISO.. Chimp and adjust exposure accordingly..

Tripod, shutter remote is a must,, so is manual focus and manual mode exposure setting.... I never use mirror lock up because I don't believe it's necessary with very long exposures.. I look for nice blacks, clean whites and strong colours..


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drocpsu
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Jan 29, 2010 09:35 as a reply to  @ yogestee's post |  #5

I'm by no means an expert, but I've found that taking long exposure shots just takes some practice and experimenting. I agree with yogestee that it's somewhat of a mystery as to what the exposure will end up looking like.

I also agree that intense directed light sources in the image (directed toward your camera) tend to really overexpose and blow out in a long exposure. If you're shooting them, you're either going to have to deal with that or underexpose the image to minimize it. But then the rest will be dark. I find that non-directional light works best. I also think that long exposures around dusk are excellent because you're still able to get some color in the sky (rather than just black or gray). I took these with my old Canon Powershot S3 (on a tripod, using the 2-sec timer shutter release):

IMAGE: http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3003/2616566997_55bd438d27.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …in/set-72157600058456713/  (external link)

IMAGE: http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2440/3996618107_9949ef5e10.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …in/set-72157600058456713/  (external link)

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Diamond ­ Dave
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Jan 29, 2010 12:05 |  #6

Your shots look fine. Two things that I notice in your comparison shots--they're both at dusk when the sky is dark blue but not yet black, and the streetlights in those shots are much farther away.

Just experiment. There's no wrong exposure at night. ;)




  
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AMD87
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Jan 29, 2010 12:16 |  #7

Like everyone else says just practice, you'll find something your happy with in the end. :)

IMAGE: http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2487/3985446712_3dc3931689.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/42427406@N05/3​985446712/  (external link)

IMAGE: http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3453/3985350330_e8d81d80e7.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/42427406@N05/3​985350330/  (external link)

IMAGE: http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2757/4027766426_a3df4d7590.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/42427406@N05/4​027766426/  (external link)

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quadwing
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Jan 29, 2010 17:30 |  #8

yogestee wrote in post #9496912 (external link)
Night shots using long exposures isn't rocket science,,it's mainly guess work.. Shooting long exposures there is the glorious unknown of what you'll get.. You won't see what you'll get until you have the image up on a computer screen or the camera's LCD screen atleast.. One problem is contrast which you can use to your advantage if you are smart.. I like the blacks in the background, the points of white light and the high intensity colours,,some photographers don't..

Depending on the situation I normally start at 15 seconds at f/11 at 100 ISO.. Chimp and adjust exposure accordingly..

Tripod, shutter remote is a must,, so is manual focus and manual mode exposure setting.... I never use mirror lock up because I don't believe it's necessary with very long exposures.. I look for nice blacks, clean whites and strong colours..

I guess I could also mess around with it in post, but to be honest, I'm not a fan of post-processing. But thank you! I can't really ever seem to get a perfect focus when manual focusing in the dark though. I'm not sure why! =P

By the way, that is probably one of the best long exposures I've EVER seen in my life!

drocpsu wrote in post #9497058 (external link)
I'm by no means an expert, but I've found that taking long exposure shots just takes some practice and experimenting. I agree with yogestee that it's somewhat of a mystery as to what the exposure will end up looking like.

I also agree that intense directed light sources in the image (directed toward your camera) tend to really overexpose and blow out in a long exposure. If you're shooting them, you're either going to have to deal with that or underexpose the image to minimize it. But then the rest will be dark. I find that non-directional light works best. I also think that long exposures around dusk are excellent because you're still able to get some color in the sky (rather than just black or gray). I took these with my old Canon Powershot S3 (on a tripod, using the 2-sec timer shutter release):

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …in/set-72157600058456713/  (external link)

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …in/set-72157600058456713/  (external link)

Hm, it's weird, because when I went outside, it looked like it was right post-sundown, which is weird, because it was 12 AM. By the way, I really like your second shot, so to my eye it looked a lot different. I'm not sure why.

Diamond Dave wrote in post #9498061 (external link)
Your shots look fine. Two things that I notice in your comparison shots--they're both at dusk when the sky is dark blue but not yet black, and the streetlights in those shots are much farther away.

Just experiment. There's no wrong exposure at night. ;)

Hm, well thank you! It just looks obnoxiously harsh to me, that's all... And haha, I don't think it was dusk.. It was around 12AM when I took those shots. :\ Just the moon was reflecting off of the snow.

AMD87 wrote in post #9498114 (external link)
Like everyone else says just practice, you'll find something your happy with in the end. :)

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/42427406@N05/3​985446712/  (external link)

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/42427406@N05/3​985350330/  (external link)

http://www.flickr.com …/42427406@N05/4​027766426/ (external link)

Last shot is absolutely gorgeous!!


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Diamond ­ Dave
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Jan 29, 2010 19:30 |  #9

quadwing wrote in post #9500115 (external link)
And haha, I don't think it was dusk.. It was around 12AM when I took those shots. :\ Just the moon was reflecting off of the snow.

No, I mean the one's you're attempting to mimic.

I was wondering how I could get more photos like this during the night that aren't nearly as harsh, but are just as beautiful?

http://farm2.static.fl​ickr.com/1215/...9a2aa​5a8_o.jpg (external link) - something such as this

or this:

http://cmdawson.com/bl​og/uploaded_im...ght-700458.jpg (external link)




  
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yogestee
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Jan 31, 2010 15:10 |  #10

By the way, that is probably one of the best long exposures I've EVER seen in my life!

Thanks for that.. Here are some more from the same series..


http://www.pbase.com/j​urgentreue/patuxay&pag​e=all (external link)


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paradiddleluke
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Jan 31, 2010 15:43 |  #11

take a shot at street lights first, not stop lights, they're easier to get with still exposing everything else, if you have a new snow, use that to your advantage to practice because it will help with not letting the lights be the only thing well exposed.

heres one of my favorite that i've gotten!

IMAGE: http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4036/4232222956_0f4a4b0f4e.jpg
if you want to get cars, make sure that you are standing where they will pass and only show the back lights, front lights of a car will completely blow the picture unless you are at an appropriate angle to not get the strong headlights, cars can be fun though
i'd just try regular lights before stop lights, they seem like they can be tricky!
IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: NOT FOUND | MIME changed to 'image/gif' | Redirected to error image by FLICKR


IF YOU WANT TO DO SOME STARS.... do yourself a favor, if its not that cold this wont matter but to save time as stars are hard to get the focus just right, set your ISO to 6400 or whatever you want, get a quick shutter speed and wide open aperture, take a few shots (exposure time should only be around 2" if that, this way you dont waste time (10 seconds on mirror lockup remote shutter, along with 30 seconds for the actual shot to find you have a shot out of focus, once you've found the focus then stop down and turn the iso down. have fun! dress warm!

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