Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 11 Feb 2010 (Thursday) 08:09
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Do you follow a procedure when changing lenses

 
hairy_moth
Goldmember
Avatar
3,739 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 16
Joined Apr 2009
Location: NJ
     
Feb 11, 2010 08:09 |  #1

The other day I was astonished when I watched a person change lenses with no concern for keeping dust out of the camera or lenses. I have always had a ritual, but now I am wondering how others do it.

My steps

1. Get out of direct sunlight; put lens cap on old lens.

2. Unscrew (but don't remove) the back cap of the new lens, stand the lens (rear end) up with the rear cap laying on top.

3. With the camera pointed to the ground (to keep dust from falling into the camera) remove the lens and place it next to the new lens

4. Place the rear cap from new lens on top of the old lens and put the new one on the camera that is still pointed to the ground.

5. Screw on the rear cap of the old lens and put it back in the bag.

6. Remove the lens cap and shoot.

I do steps 3 and 4 as quickly as possible to minimize the amount of dust getting, first into the camera, and second onto the rear of the lens.

The person that I watched was carrying on a conversation while she changed lenses. She had all of the lens caps off and laid the camera on a table facing straight up while she dug around in her bag. Watching her drove me nuts!


7D | 300D | G1X | Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 | EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 | EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro | EF 85mm f/1.8 | 70-200 f/2.8L MkII -- flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
gjl711
"spouting off stupid things"
Avatar
56,225 posts
Likes: 2925
Joined Aug 2006
Location: Deep in the heart of Texas
     
Feb 11, 2010 08:16 |  #2

I use to be much more careful and went to great lengths to avoid dust. But now that I have had gone through 5 different bodies and have been dealing with dust issues for several years, I'm much more relaxed. I do switch my lenses quickly but all this hanging upside down stuff does nothing. Dust happens and it's so simple to blow it out that it's not worth stressing over.

About the only time I will get out of the elements is if it's raining, really foggy, or really windy and dusty like at a beach. I'll change lenses in the car or go out with both bodies, one with a wide zoom and one with a long zoom and not change lenses.


Not sure why, but call me JJ.
I used to hate math but then I realised decimals have a point.
.
::Flickr:: (external link)
::Gear::

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
TheHoff
Don't Hassle....
Avatar
8,804 posts
Likes: 15
Joined Jan 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
     
Feb 11, 2010 08:44 |  #3

Dust gets in whether I'm fastidious when changing lenses or not. It is easier to blow it out before a shoot than to always be freaky when swapping things around. I'd rather be fast at lens changes to get the shot and clone out some dust after than be slow and miss things.


••Vancouver Wedding Photographer  (external link)••| [gear list] | Latest blog: 5 steps to stopping image loss (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Cesium
Goldmember
1,967 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Jun 2009
     
Feb 11, 2010 09:01 |  #4

1) Take off lens.
2) Put on another one.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
RPCrowe
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
8,262 posts
Likes: 2094
Joined Nov 2005
Location: San Diego County, California, USA
     
Feb 11, 2010 09:18 as a reply to  @ Cesium's post |  #5

I seldom change lenses in the field

The advantage of shooting with a pair of camera bodies is not only having a very wide focal range available (with great IQ and terrific AF along with relatively fast apertures and IS) is that I seldom need to change lenses in the field.

I not only do not miss out on shots while I am changing lenses, I am far more likely to use the correct focal length for each shot.

Finally, I have a backup camera immediately available and I also have longer battery life and greater CF memory since I am dividing my shots between two or more cameras.


See my images at http://rpcrowe.smugmug​.com/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
shooterman
village idiot, actually a genius!
Avatar
1,295 posts
Gallery: 4 photos
Likes: 385
Joined Jun 2007
Location: Laguna Hills, CA
     
Feb 11, 2010 09:20 |  #6

My procedure:

1) Take
2) off
3) lens
4) put
5) on
6) another
7) one

Whew, I'm exhausted. :)


Randy
| Canon 5D Classic | Canon 30D | Canon EF 40mm F2.8 | Canon 70-200 L F4 | Tamron XR DiII SP 17-50 F2.8 | Elinchrom D-Lites | Calumet Genesis 200 | Elinchrom EL Skyports | 27" 5K iMac |

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
hairy_moth
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
3,739 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 16
Joined Apr 2009
Location: NJ
     
Feb 11, 2010 09:49 |  #7

Okay.. Thanks all for confirming that I really am anal; I have always suspected. :)
This is just a hobby for me, and while I do still have my old 300D, shooting with it is agony after using a the 7D; so two bodies is out.

With the exception of getting out of sunlight (a practice I adopted when using film), nothing about my routine really takes very long, so I'll stick with it when time is not critical.


7D | 300D | G1X | Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 | EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 | EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro | EF 85mm f/1.8 | 70-200 f/2.8L MkII -- flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tdodd
Goldmember
Avatar
3,733 posts
Likes: 3
Joined Jun 2006
Location: Essex, UK
     
Feb 11, 2010 10:31 |  #8

I have six EOS bodies, the oldest being 3.5 years old, and nine lenses. To date I have only performed one wet clean and I have not used my Rocket blower for over a year. The wet clean was on my 30D after over a year of ownership, more like 15 months, I think. If I have dust then I don't see it. Whatever I am doing, it works for me. What I can say is that I rarely change lenses in the field. If I want more than one lens then I usually take two bodies and I sort out my lenses at home before I leave for my shoot. A short/wide f/2.8 zoom and a longer zoom have me well covered. I might take primes if I have concerns about the light, but I rarely use them.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
[Hyuni]
Goldmember
Avatar
1,186 posts
Likes: 15
Joined Dec 2008
Location: CHiCAGO
     
Feb 11, 2010 11:05 |  #9

I used to be worried about dust and take every precaution before switching lenses, but I realized that the dust issue is no problem and a simple rocket blower will get rid of the issue.

The ONLY time I am cautious about switching out lenses, it when the air is damp or wet because the dust can stick to the sensor and a rocket blower won't get it off.


6D Rokinon 14 f/2.8 l EF 35 ƒ1.4L l EF 135 ƒ2.0L l EF 70-200 ƒ2.8L IS II l YN460 l 580EX II l Flick'd (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
number ­ six
fully entitled to be jealous
Avatar
8,953 posts
Likes: 84
Joined May 2007
Location: SF Bay Area
     
Feb 11, 2010 15:23 |  #10

hairy_moth wrote in post #9588384 (external link)
With the exception of getting out of sunlight (a practice I adopted when using film), nothing about my routine really takes very long, so I'll stick with it when time is not critical.

What's the point? Sure, sunlight can sneak in and fog film - maybe - when the lens is off, but that has no application at all with digital cameras.

Bright light on the sensor? I use a very bright LED light/magnifier when cleaning the sensor. Nothing wrong with that.

-js


"Be seeing you."
50D - 17-55 f/2.8 IS - 18-55 IS - 28-105 II USM - 60 f/2.8 macro - 70-200 f/4 L - Sigma flash

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
DisrupTer911
Goldmember
Avatar
2,452 posts
Gallery: 4 photos
Likes: 29
Joined Jul 2008
Location: NJ, USA
     
Feb 11, 2010 15:33 |  #11

and besides, the curtain is covering the sensor from sunlight anyway...


www.vividemotionphotograph​y.comexternal link

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
JWright
Planes, trains and ham radio...
Avatar
18,399 posts
Likes: 31
Joined Dec 2004
     
Feb 11, 2010 18:15 as a reply to  @ DisrupTer911's post |  #12

I usually take the caps off my lenses before I ever start shooting and leave them off during the shoot. I'll take a lens off and drop it into a pouch without the caps so it's ready when I need it again. I also use Black Rapid straps and attach them to the tripod collar foot of my 70-200 or 100-400. I;ll even go so far as to remove the camera from the lens and leave the lens hanging from the strap with the back wide open while I shoot with a shorter lens on the camera.

I just love watching the OCD newbies spin up when I do that... :mrgreen:


John

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Mark1
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,725 posts
Likes: 7
Joined Feb 2008
Location: Maryland
     
Feb 11, 2010 18:27 |  #13

I cant say I have ever worried about dust when I change lenses. While I am far from reckless about it...I am just as far from careful.

It is funny hearing all the OCD stories about how careful people are about it. It seems the more people work with their cameras the less they obsess about it.

Lens caps off in a tray in a studio is nothing. I have seen working pros that keep their lenses at the ready on a lil blanket in the grass as they do an outdoor shoot, none of the lenses have either the front or rear cap in place. And they lay there by the hour.


www.darkslisemag.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
RDKirk
Adorama says I'm "packed."
Avatar
13,691 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 910
Joined May 2004
Location: USA
     
Feb 11, 2010 18:28 as a reply to  @ JWright's post |  #14

With the exception of getting out of sunlight (a practice I adopted when using film), nothing about my routine really takes very long, so I'll stick with it when time is not critical.

So why did you ask if it makes no difference to you?


TANSTAAFL--The Only Unbreakable Rule in Photography

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
matonanjin
Goldmember
2,378 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Feb 2008
Location: Omaha, NE
     
Feb 11, 2010 19:00 |  #15

I shoot dirty, dusty horse shows for a living. I follow Cesium's procedure.

But I clean sensors after every week-end and send them in to be thoroughly cleaned once a year. And I'm with the Hoff. I can't worry about lens swapping at a shoot.


My Web Site (external link)

My Equine Photography Blog (external link)
My Stuff and Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

5,579 views & 0 likes for this thread
Do you follow a procedure when changing lenses
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is lindahaynesss
832 guests, 208 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.