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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 17 Feb 2010 (Wednesday) 14:12
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Eos 1 and 3 film bodies - second hand advice please!

 
Lowner
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Feb 20, 2010 18:50 as a reply to  @ post 9647833 |  #16

I will not bore you with the many ways my Eos-3 is better than my 30D. But I will give one example plucked at random:

I use a 100-400L with a 1.4x converter for motorsport. On the 30D the pins of the converter need taping to fool the camera AF system. On the Eos-3 no such shenanigans are required.

My only problem with the Eos-3 is not actually the camera at all, it's the lack of quality processing labs near me. I have to send film away to get the sort of service we used to get everywhere. I had six Velvia cassettes processed via my local camera shop and four came back with the emulsion as black as your hat and wrinkled like an elephant hide while the other two were just black. Lord knows what they had done to them. I got 6 replacement Velvias and an apology, but thats hardly the point. I also get negs and slides scratched to kingdom come because the machinery is not maintained properly.


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hpulley
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Feb 20, 2010 18:54 |  #17

Agreed, processing is disappointing these days because the volume is low. It is expensive but the quality is worse than before and it takes a long time sometimes for them to get enough rolls locally to process it so it can actually be faster to mail it away.


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liamjf
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Feb 22, 2010 13:34 |  #18

Hi John, I don't know how cheap you expect an EOS3 to be but Mifsuds are selling them for £129! Or £169 with a PBE1 battery grip! I absolutely adore my EOS3 and its only the hassle of having to get all my rolls of film processed at great expense and then having to scan all the negatives (and find the dust, dirt and water marks on them) that I have finally given up waiting for a 3D and purchased a second hand 5D. (No way am I going to pay £1700 for a MKII and still not have 45 point auto focus).

Cheers


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hpulley
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Feb 22, 2010 14:04 |  #19

Yes, it seems they want you to buy a 1Ds for 45-AF points full frame. I actually prefer the 1D as the 45 points cover more of the frame, much closer to the corners at 1.3x and it is waaaay cheaper too. Not as wide angle or DOF are the downsides of course.


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laydros
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Feb 22, 2010 14:28 |  #20

I think the point about film's resurgence is an important one, along with the fact that film cameras don't age the way digital does.

I shot film in a snapshot matter many years ago, but didn't become seriously interested in photography until a couple of years ago, so I started with a digital. At the time film gear was rock bottom cheap. I think in the past year things have started to turn around. Few people will shoot film anymore for professional work, digital has caught up with any resolution differences it used to have. Especially when you take cost into consideration, I'd rather have a 5D Mk II, or 1Ds III, D3x, A900 than medium format film. You are going to have better res out of the hi-res FF digital than the medium format unless you spend serious cash on scanning. My 5D can pretty much do everything a 35mm film camera can.

However, the almost backlash against film seems to be going away. Probably in part because it did become so cheap to get into. One of the biggest advantages of digital is cost per shot. But the upfront costs of film have become really low. People that can only afford a Rebel can afford the film gear that only the wealthiest could afford in the 70s and 80s. A killer enlarger, Canon F-1, and manual focus L glass can be found for dirt cheap.

As for being old tech... the only serious difference in the newer DSLRs and older is the screens on the back, and the sensor, and video. Many don't care about video, and film never had a screen on the back. However the resolution, dynamic range, and in particular high ISO noise of digital has improved greatly from, say, 1D to 1D IV. Therefore perfectly good 1Ds go for a pittance. And I know I haven't jumped on one, since I'm so used to shooting 10MP+ at ISO 1600.

Film cameras sensors don't ever fall behind the times. Pretty much we figured out everything we now know about optics by the 50s, coatings pretty much became modern by the 70s. Image quality of these older lenses is very good, they just don't have auto-focus, and the zooms are poor. And you can throw the newest 35mm high tech film in a 1950s rangefinder, and get really, really good results. In most cases, just as good as a 1V. The 1V just gives you a bunch of automation.


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Austin.Manny
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Feb 22, 2010 14:34 |  #21

laydros wrote in post #9659623 (external link)
I think the point about film's resurgence is an important one, along with the fact that film cameras don't age the way digital does.

I shot film in a snapshot matter many years ago, but didn't become seriously interested in photography until a couple of years ago, so I started with a digital. At the time film gear was rock bottom cheap. I think in the past year things have started to turn around. Few people will shoot film anymore for professional work, digital has caught up with any resolution differences it used to have. Especially when you take cost into consideration, I'd rather have a 5D Mk II, or 1Ds III, D3x, A900 than medium format film. You are going to have better res out of the hi-res FF digital than the medium format unless you spend serious cash on scanning. My 5D can pretty much do everything a 35mm film camera can.

However, the almost backlash against film seems to be going away. Probably in part because it did become so cheap to get into. One of the biggest advantages of digital is cost per shot. But the upfront costs of film have become really low. People that can only afford a Rebel can afford the film gear that only the wealthiest could afford in the 70s and 80s. A killer enlarger, Canon F-1, and manual focus L glass can be found for dirt cheap.

As for being old tech... the only serious difference in the newer DSLRs and older is the screens on the back, and the sensor, and video. Many don't care about video, and film never had a screen on the back. However the resolution, dynamic range, and in particular high ISO noise of digital has improved greatly from, say, 1D to 1D IV. Therefore perfectly good 1Ds go for a pittance. And I know I haven't jumped on one, since I'm so used to shooting 10MP+ at ISO 1600.

Film cameras "sensors" don't ever fall behind the times. Pretty much we figured out everything we now know about optics by the 50s, coatings pretty much became modern by the 70s. Image quality of these older lenses is very good, they just don't have auto-focus, and the zooms are poor. And you can throw the newest 35mm high tech film in a 1950s rangefinder, and get really, really good results. In most cases, just as good as a 1V. The 1V just gives you a bunch of automation.

Fixed it for ya. ;)


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Eos 1 and 3 film bodies - second hand advice please!
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