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Thread started 27 Mar 2010 (Saturday) 14:39
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What does Macro Mode on my 30D do?

 
Boomsnapp
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Mar 27, 2010 14:39 |  #1

I know the title of this topic is somewhat misleading. I know what macro photography is, what I mean is what does my camera do when I put it in Macro mode?

I know that on point and shoots, when you put them in Macro mode it actually shifts the AF unit so that it can focus on close up subjects. However, I was always under the impression that on DSLRs your macro ability was completely dependent on what lens you are using. So for example, the 18-55mm kit lens that came with the 30D only has a set focusing range, however it cant focus as close as a dedicated Macro lens. So what happens when you put the camera in Macro mode? Does it change anything in the lens? Or the autofocus? I havent noticed my lenses being able to focus any closer when I put the camera in Macro mode. Or does Macro mode act like Portrait or Nighttime modes and simply sets the settings in the camera to what would be best for Macro photography, but doesnt actually change anything optically?

I dont know if I worded this in a way that makes sense. :confused:


Canon EOS 30D 28-90mm F4-5.6 III :( EF-S 55-250 :)

  
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theextremist04
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Mar 27, 2010 14:44 |  #2

Boomsnapp wrote:
9882372Or does Macro mode act like Portrait or Nighttime modes and simply sets the settings in the camera to what would be best for Macro photography, but doesnt actually change anything optically?

This. If you're interested in macro work then you'll need a dedicated macro lens.


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themadman
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Mar 27, 2010 14:58 |  #3

The camera isn't capable of changing anything optically. I have no clue what "macro" mode does as I never sue any of the random modes. Does the manual not say what it does?

Edit: According to the manual

The AF mode will be set to <ONE SHOT>, the drive mode will be set to <BOX>, and the metering mode will be set to <EVALUATIVE> automatically.

Bottom of page 48.


Will | WilliamLiuPhotography.​com (external link) | Gear List and Feedback | CPS Member | Have you Pre-Ordered Your 3Dx Yet? | HorusBennu Discussion | In honor of Uncle Steve, thanks for everything! 10-5-2011

  
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Luke ­ Cern
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Mar 27, 2010 15:13 |  #4

[QUOTE=Boomsnapp;98823​72]I know the title of this topic is somewhat misleading. I know what macro photography is, what I mean is what does my camera do when I put it in Macro mode?

I know that on point and shoots, when you put them in Macro mode it actually shifts the AF unit so that it can focus on close up subjects. However, I was always under the impression that on DSLRs your macro ability was completely dependent on what lens you are using. So for example, the 18-55mm kit lens that came with the 30D only has a set focusing range, however it cant focus as close as a dedicated Macro lens. So what happens when you put the camera in Macro mode? Does it change anything in the lens? Or the autofocus? I havent noticed my lenses being able to focus any closer when I put the camera in Macro mode. Or does Macro mode act like Portrait or Nighttime modes and simply sets the settings in the camera to what would be best for Macro photography, but doesnt actually change anything optically?

I dont know if I worded this in a way that makes sense. :confused:[/quote

Actually it's quite a good question. I had a 30D but since I always shot in RAW / manual mode, I never noticed the Macro mode. Apparently (after doing some research), I have found that one thing that it does is apply a "scene" setting (in-camera processing parameters for JPEG), that might be appropriate for close ups. What that means is that the processor adjusts the curve of the image to (perhaps) increase brightness, or sharpening. I don't think it applies to any RAW shooting. JPEG only. The same principle applies to "Sports", "Landscape", "Portrait" and "Night". It makes no mechanical adjustment to your lens. As has been mentioned, you would still need to be using a lens that is suitable for macro photography, but that is a moot point now, because many of us use anything up to 400mm to capture insects etc.

Reference: Here (external link)

EDIT: The post above mine adds more to this.

The main point would be that by choosing this mode, you would be handing most control to the camera and you would lose the ability to make your own judgement and to get the results you are looking for by applying experience.


______________
Torquay Devon UK
5D MkII , 300mm f/4 L IS, 135mm f/2.0 L, , 24-105 L IS, 180mm Sigma Macro, 100mm f/2.8 Macro, 15mm Fisheye, Sigma 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6, TC, Gitzo G1298 Basalt. 580EX MKII, 430EX, ST-E2.

  
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Overread
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Mar 27, 2010 15:19 |  #5

The you are correct, to take photos on a DSLR that are macro you need a proper macro lens. These can come with focus limiter switches which will limit what part of the focus range is usable, this is mostly for auto focus so that you can use the lens normally without it hunting through all the close focusing part of the focus range (thus speeding up af).

Macro mode on the DSLR, like the other auto modes such as landscape etc... simply tells the camera to shoot automatically, but to have a preference for a smaller aperture so that you get more depth of field in the shot - a commonly used thing for macro work. Chances are a few other fancy things are done, but in the end the camera is only working to preset the settings to a commonly understood range for macro work.
Once you understand how to use aperture, shutter speed and ISO (the only 3 photographic settings the camera has) as well as how to read metering results the auto modes quickly become redundant (I haven't touched them since I learnt). I do recomend the books:

Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson for a very good grounding in the three controls (ISO, aperture, shutter speed) and how they interact and affect your exposure. It is aimed at beginners and gives a lot of easy to understand info
The Digital Photogrpahy Book by Scot Kelby a bit more basic than the book above this book does less of the explaining of settings, but more to suggesting different starting points for settings for different kinds of shoot. When starting I found this great for getting a where to start point for things and building on from there.


Tools of the trade: Canon 400D, Canon 7D, Canon 70-200mm f2.8 IS L M2, Sigma 120-300mm f2.8 OS, Canon MPE 65mm f2.8 macro, Sigma 150mm f2.8 macro, Tamron 24-70mm f2.4, Sigma 70mm f2.8 macro, Sigma 8-16mm f4.5-5.6, Raynox DCR 250, loads of teleconverters and a flashy thingy too
My flickr (external link)

  
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flyboy89
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Mar 27, 2010 21:24 |  #6

I believe I read somewhere / noticed, that when you use this mode, the camera tends to use slightly higher aperture values (larger numbers) to ensure more area in focus. Which would help you get more in focus at that close macro range :P. I think it would give me F4 to F5.6 with my 50 1.4.




  
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What does Macro Mode on my 30D do?
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