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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 13 Mar 2011 (Sunday) 17:02
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What are your techniques for stabilizing a zoom lens?

 
konfuzd1
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Mar 13, 2011 17:02 |  #1

I just bought a 70-200 f4L last week, and I have to admit, whoever called it a "gateway drug" leading to an addiction to L lenses was absolutely correct! It puts my 28-135 kit lens to shame as far as sharpness, color, fringing, etc. The only drawback is that it is not the IS version. I'm looking for ideas on how to get better shots at slower shutter speeds. So far, I've figured out that if I grab my right arm with my left hand, the lens will rest perfectly on my left elbow and be much less shaky. I have it mounted on a 50D with a battery grip, so the extra weight helps also. The third factor I've noticed is that 6(ish) frames per second high speed continuous is almost as good as IS, but that one good shot of ten may not be the one I wanted. So that being said, I'm polling the audience for suggestions. Please let me know if you have a technique or contraption that can help reduce the shakiness of a non-stabilized zoom.


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crn3371
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Mar 13, 2011 17:09 |  #2

Right hand holding camera. Left hand cradling lens with elbow tight against your body.




  
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Saint728
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Mar 13, 2011 17:12 |  #3

I use my left hand with thumb facing away from the camera under the lens cupping the bottom of the lens with my palm. I then rest my forearm/left elbow against my chest, sort of like a support bracket.

Take Care,
Cheers, Patrick


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kjonnnn
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Mar 13, 2011 17:15 |  #4

Also try ...

http://www.photography​blog.com …nd-hold_a_telephoto_lens/ (external link)




  
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Todd ­ Lambert
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Mar 13, 2011 17:23 |  #5

I put it on this thing called a tripod. It cures all woes!

;-)a




  
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DreDaze
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Mar 13, 2011 17:36 |  #6

i've never seen that technique...it seems like it would be exhausting...

here's another video link:
http://www.youtube.com​/watch?v=EDsx3-FWfwk (external link)

i usually have my elbow into my body at about a 45degree angle...sometimes i do the method above, and use my shoulder


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tutwood
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Mar 13, 2011 17:45 as a reply to  @ DreDaze's post |  #7

£11 monopod from ebay




  
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Shane ­ W
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Mar 13, 2011 17:54 |  #8

Practice, practice, practice! I have the non IS f2.8 and it took some time to get comfortable and stable, but you will get it. Now, get back out there and shoot some more!


Shane W

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Savas ­ K
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Mar 13, 2011 19:43 as a reply to  @ Shane W's post |  #9

Soft touch works. The more you try to steady, the more rigid and un-steady goes the grip.




  
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jeremytf
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Mar 13, 2011 22:04 as a reply to  @ Savas K's post |  #10

If you pay attention, there are often opportunities to lean against a wall, rest your elbow on a railing, and otherwise take advantage of other structures. That can greatly help, in addition to being aware of your breathing and timing your shots accordingly.


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KVN ­ Photo
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Mar 13, 2011 22:07 |  #11

Leaning against a solid object, or hold your breath before pushing full the shutter button


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Steve ­ of ­ Cornubia
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Mar 13, 2011 22:08 as a reply to  @ jeremytf's post |  #12

This is what monopods are for. Apart from providing a steadying effect, they can be a big help fatigue-wise.


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peregrineflier
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Mar 14, 2011 01:28 |  #13

Use high shuuter speeds and don't look back. : )


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MikeI
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Mar 14, 2011 02:20 |  #14

Elbow into your chest and bump the ISO...the need to steady decreases with a faster shutter speed:)


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hennie
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Mar 14, 2011 06:05 |  #15

Use either a tripod, monopod or one of the many types of shoulder support that are mostly advertized for video shooting.
http://www.cameratown.​com …/DSLR_Cinematog​raphy3.cfm (external link)

My experience with a small sized shoulder support (fits in my pocket) is a gain in the same range as
what can be gained by IS (2->3 stops).




  
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What are your techniques for stabilizing a zoom lens?
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