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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Sports Talk 
Thread started 17 Mar 2011 (Thursday) 16:57
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Could this happen to you

 
lauderdalems
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Mar 17, 2011 16:57 |  #1

This was a minor league game - but it could happen in a high school.

KISSIMMEE, Fla. (AP) - Atlanta Braves minor league manager Luis Salazar has lost an eye after he was struck in the face by a line drive while watching a spring training game.
Braves general manager Frank Wren said Wednesday that doctors were unable to save Salazar's left eye after the accident March 9. The former major league player is otherwise recovering from his injuries and expects to manage Lynchburg of the Class A Carolina League this season.
The 54-year-old Salazar was standing against the railing on the top step of the dugout during a game between the Braves and St. Louis Cardinals when Brian McCann fouled a ball in his direction. Salazar was unable to get out of the way and fell head-first back into the dugout.


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estabro
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Mar 17, 2011 19:50 |  #2

Big Canon lenses offer great protection from foul balls.


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Dan-o
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Mar 17, 2011 23:23 |  #3

Big Canon lenses offer great protection from foul balls.

No, they really don't.


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MJPhotos24
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Mar 18, 2011 01:38 |  #4

estabro wrote in post #12040769 (external link)
Big Canon lenses offer great protection from foul balls.

No, they don't...I've worn a few liners and had three monopods shattered, they are not offering protection and should be regulation as to how all stadiums are built. I.e. they should force players to be behind the fence that's in front of the dugout, not leaning over it, protection for media - and especially get rid of any of allowing people who shouldn't be on the field on the field.


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Sledhed
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Mar 18, 2011 09:05 |  #5

estabro wrote in post #12040769 (external link)
Big Canon lenses offer great protection from foul balls.

I don't think so either!


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snyderman
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Mar 18, 2011 09:49 |  #6

baseball is definitely the scariest of sport due to the split-second unpredictability of action inherent to the game.

Did you happen to see the highlight from the spring training game yesterday where a hitter lost the bat in full swing with the bat striking a coach standing on the steps (open area) of the dugout? Thankfully, the coach wasn't seriously injured because he was paying full attention to the action.

Same thing with the fans sitting in lower box seats down 1st and 3rd base lines. You'd better keep your eyes on the action so you can duck when a changeup is lined into those seating areas!

dave


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moose10101
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Mar 18, 2011 09:50 |  #7

lauderdalems wrote in post #12039922 (external link)
This was a minor league game - but it could happen in a high school.

This could happen in Little League. Pitchers are especially vulnerable.




  
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MJPhotos24
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Mar 18, 2011 10:41 |  #8

moose10101 wrote in post #12043607 (external link)
This could happen in Little League. Pitchers are especially vulnerable.

They're not hitting nearly as hard, but the a ball hitting the right spot could be deadly at any level. As a pitcher (15 years old) I got knocked out on the mound, followed through and a liner to my eye and went sleepy for a second or two before coming back.


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RSB
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Mar 18, 2011 10:59 as a reply to  @ MJPhotos24's post |  #9

I have a close friend who was sitting in the front row at an Astros game last week, and was struck in the face by a foul ball. She was knocked out, game was stopped for 15 minutes. She had reconstructive surgery yesterday, and they were able to save her eye. Although most of us don't view it as such, baseball can be a very, very dangerous game, for players, coaches, as well as those in the stands. If you're shooting baseball at any level, you need to be vigilant, and aware of everything that's going on on the field at all times. Even then, you also need to be lucky.


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moose10101
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Mar 18, 2011 11:10 |  #10

MJPhotos24 wrote in post #12043908 (external link)
They're not hitting nearly as hard, but the a ball hitting the right spot could be deadly at any level. As a pitcher (15 years old) I got knocked out on the mound, followed through and a liner to my eye and went sleepy for a second or two before coming back.

My son's 13-14 league had a few kids who were 6 feet tall, 200 pounds, and hit the ball as hard as some major leaguers. One of them hit a rocket at our third baseman, who didn't move a muscle until after the ball whizzed past his ear. They should have moved these kids up to the next group just for safety reasons, but they don't seem to be too concerned about safety; they routinely disregard the rec council's rules for lightning/thunder delays.

My son has decided that he's done with baseball, not because of the danger, but because there's not enough action. That's fine with me. He's going to focus on swimming, which is pretty safe and better exercise.




  
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clarence
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Mar 18, 2011 13:12 |  #11

RSB wrote in post #12044002 (external link)
I have a close friend who was sitting in the front row at an Astros game last week, and was struck in the face by a foul ball. She was knocked out, game was stopped for 15 minutes. She had reconstructive surgery yesterday, and they were able to save her eye.

http://houston.astros.​mlb.com …key=notebook_ho​u&c_id=hou (external link)

Fan injured by foul ball Saturday

By Brian McTaggart / MLB.com
KISSIMMEE, Fla. -- Saturday's game between the Astros and Orioles at Osceola County Stadium was delayed about 15 minutes in the top of the seventh inning after a fan was struck in the head by a foul ball and taken away on a stretcher.

The unidentified female was struck near the right eye by a line drive off the bat of Orioles first baseman Jake Fox while sitting in the first row down the left-field line, near the Astros' bullpen. The extent of her injuries is unknown, and eyewitnesses said that her husband fainted while she was being taken to an Orlando-area hospital.

"It was real scary," Astros manager Brad Mills said. "I know the game stopped, but our hearts stopped, too."

Astros catcher Carlos Corporan was in the bullpen and saw the ball strike the woman.
"It was scary," Corporan said. "They were talking to each other, and somebody yelled 'Watch out!' She turned right as the ball hit her in the eye. As soon as the ball hit her, she passed out. She had a really bad cut in the eye. It was a real scary moment." Corporan said that the woman regained consciousness after she was put on a stretcher and was responding to paramedics. "If you're going to come to the ballpark, you can have fun, but you have to pay attention or the ball can kill somebody," he said. "It could be a really sad moment, you know? It was really, really hard today."

When the game resumed, Fox fouled off a pitch before striking out swinging.


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MJPhotos24
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Mar 18, 2011 14:28 |  #12

moose10101 wrote in post #12044053 (external link)
My son's 13-14 league had a few kids who were 6 feet tall, 200 pounds, and hit the ball as hard as some major leaguers. One of them hit a rocket at our third baseman, who didn't move a muscle until after the ball whizzed past his ear. They should have moved these kids up to the next group just for safety reasons, but they don't seem to be too concerned about safety; they routinely disregard the rec council's rules for lightning/thunder delays.

My son has decided that he's done with baseball, not because of the danger, but because there's not enough action. That's fine with me. He's going to focus on swimming, which is pretty safe and better exercise.

There's some that are hitting the ball hard, but major league level - not even close to close. I've coached some 12-16 year olds who could rake the ball, but nowhere near higher level off the bat speeds. I've felt in danger at MLB, MiLB, collegiate and some high school games, never at a youth game - just moves so much slower.

Swimming is the best exercise one can do, though baseball is my game (hence the Don Zimmer body I got working instead of Michael Phelps).


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BlueDevil08
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Mar 18, 2011 14:48 |  #13

this has nothing to do with photography but the biggest issue with little league all the way through the college level is the metal bat. With a wooden bat, a 90 mph fastball comes back off the bat at approximately 90mph. With a metal bat, that same fast ball comes off the bat at maybe 150mph. so the ball is coming faster towards the pitcher and infielders and its something that makes D1 level college baseball probably one of the most if not the most dangerous league/division to play because these are basically Major League caliber players playing with metal bats which is why you see so many home runs during the College World Series and other College level games even from hitters who with a wooden bat may only hit 10 or 12 a year with wood. In the past few years there have been some regulation changes to where bat manufacturers have to slow down the ball speed off the bat to try and protect pitchers just because a 90mph fastball from them reaches the batter is less than the blink of an eye, and a ball coming right back at them is just so much faster there really is not time to react.

No matter how you look at it baseball is and always will be a dangerous sport to play and watch, but fans and players alike should know that if your down on the lines you have to pay attention. But unfortunately sometimes paying attention isnt enough..


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Sledhed
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Mar 18, 2011 15:27 |  #14

Shot this kid last year, I asked the school AD about the mask and he said the kid was struck in the face the previous year. He was knocked out and was carried off the field in an ambulance.

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lauderdalems
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Mar 18, 2011 19:34 |  #15

Thanks for all the comments and concerns on this topic. The one thing I wanted to mention, when you are watching the batter through a 200 or 300 lens, you are probably going to have a lot less time to react than a fan or player watching the game. Before you shoot always have a game plan in the works when the ball comes your way.


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Could this happen to you
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